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Tropical Storm Son-tinh (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
10.29.12
 
AIRS captured infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Son-tinh on Oct. 28 at 0553 UTC › View larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Son-tinh on Oct. 28 at 0553 UTC (2:53 a.m. EDT) that showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms (purple) around the storm's center before it made landfall. The thunderstorms in the purple areas were reaching high into the troposphere where cloud top temperatures are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Son-Tinh Fill the Gulf of Tonkin

Tropical Storm Son-tinh made landfall in northern Vietnam is and is curving to the northeast to track over southern China. NASA's Aqua satellite revealed powerful thunderstorms around the storm's center before it made landfall and as it filled up the Gulf of Tonkin.

On Oct. 28 at 0553 UTC (2:53 a.m. EDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Son-tinh that showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the storm's center before it made landfall. Son-tinh was located over the Gulf of Tonkin and filled the Gulf. The Gulf of Tonkin is located off the northern Vietnam coast and southern China coast. It is a northern arm of the South China Sea.

The AIRS data showed that Son-tinh's thunderstorms were reaching high into the troposphere where cloud top temperatures are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Those storms had the potential to drop heavy rainfall at rates of 50 mm/2 inches per hour.

On Oct. 29 at 0300 UTC (11 p.m. EDT, Oct. 28), Son-tinh was over land, 60 nautical miles (69 miles/111 km) northeast of Hanoi, and was still maintaining sustained winds near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph), just below typhoon strength. It was located near 21.5 North latitude and 107.1 East longitude. It is moving to the east-northeast at 5 knots (7 mph/11 kph).

Wind shear is adversely affecting the storm as it interacts with and moves over land. Son-tinh is expected to remain over land and dissipate by Oct. 31 over southeastern China.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 26, 2012

On Oct. 26 at 0305 UTC, Son-tinh's western edge had already moved away from the Philippines. › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Son-Tinh on Oct. 26 at 0305 UTC. Son-tinh's western edge had already moved away from the Philippines. The image revealed powerful thunderstorms in the northwestern quadrant of the storm, and in the storm's center.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Son-tinh Moving Through South China Sea

NASA's Terra satellite got a good look at Tropical Storm Son-tinh moving through the South China Sea and noticed a lot of its power was in the northwestern quadrant. Son-Tinh is expected to make in Vietnam in a couple of days.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Son-Tinh on Oct. 26 at 0305 UTC (Oct. 25 at 11:05 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard captured a visible image of the storm. At the time, Son-tinh's western edge had already moved away from the Philippines. The image revealed powerful thunderstorms in the northwestern quadrant of the storm, and in the storm's center.

On Oct. 26 at 1500 UTC, Tropical Storm Son-tinh had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph). It was centered near 15.7 North latitude and 113.0 East longitude, about 355 nautical miles (408.5 miles/657 km) east of Hue, Vietnam. Son-tinh is moving to the west-northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph) and is expected to make a landfall south of Hanoi early on Oct. 28.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 25, 2012

MODIS captured a visible image of Sin-Tingh that showed the western half of the storm now over the South China Sea. › View larger image
On Oct. 25, 2012 at 0525 UTC (1:25 a.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Son-Tinh that showed the western half of the storm now over the South China Sea.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Son-tinh Moving into South China Sea

Tropical Storm Son-tinh soaked the Philippines and is now moving into the South China Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the storm as the bulk western half of the storm had already moved over water.

On Oct. 25, 2012 at 0525 UTC (1:25 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Sin-Tingh. The image showed that the western half of the storm had already moved into the South China Sea, while powerful thunderstorms in the eastern half were still dropping heavy rainfall over Luzon. Satellite data shows that the strongest bands of thunderstorms are located in the northern quadrant of the storm, with another band to the northeast of the low-level center.

As a result of the eastern half of the storm still being over land, several areas in Luzon are still under Public storm warning signal #1. Those areas under warning include the Luzon provinces of Metro Manila, Bataan, Zambales, Cavite, Batangas, Northern part of Mindoro and Lubang Island.

By 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Son-tinh had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was located about 100 nautical miles (115 miles/185 km) southwest of Manila, the Philippines, near 14.0 North and 118.9 East. It is moving to the west-northwest near 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kph).

Son-tinh is expected to cross the South China Sea in a northwesterly direction and move south of Hainan Island, China before making landfall in northern Vietnam on Oct. 27. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Son-tinh to strengthen as it crosses the South China Sea.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 24, 2012

MODIS captured a visible image of Son-tinh when its center was moving through the central Philippines. › View larger image
On Oct. 24, 2012 at 0445 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Son-tinh when its center was moving through the central Philippines.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Satellite Shows the Tropical Storm Son-tinh's Reach Over Philippines

The latest tropical storm in the western North Pacific Ocean has already spread its clouds and showers over the Philippines, as seen in NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Aqua satellite noticed that although Tropical Storm Son-tinh's center was over the central Philippines, the storm's clouds stretched into the northern reaches of the republic.

On Oct. 24, 2012 at 0445 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Son-tinh. At the time of the image, Son-tinh's center was moving through the central Philippines, but its cloud cover extended north into Luzon. The image also showed that the strongest thunderstorms were east of the center, and were still over the Philippine Sea.

On Oct. 24 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Son-tinh had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40.2 mph/64.8 kph). It was previously known as the low pressure area called "System 92W." Son-tinh was centered about 335 miles southeast of Manila, Philippines and raining over much of the country. Son-tinh's center was near 10.7 North latitude and 125.2 East longitude and moving to the northwest at 17 knots (19.5 mph/31.4 kph).

The warnings continue in the Philippines as Son-tinh tracks west and toward the South China Sea. Public storm warning signal #1 was in effect on Oct. 24 (Eastern Daylight Time) for the for the Visayas province of Northern Samar, Antique, Iloilo, Southern Negros, Southern Cebu and Bohol; also for the Mindanao provinces of Surigao del Norte and Siargao Island. Public storm warning signal #1 was also in effect for the Luzon provinces of Camarines Sur, Albay, Sorsogon, Burias Island, Southern Quezon, Marinduque, Oriental and Occidental Mindoro, Calamian Group of Islands, Batangas, Lubang Island and Cuyo Island.

In addition, Public storm warning signal #2 was in effect for the Visayas provinces of Eastern and Western Samar; Leyte, Southern Leyte, Biliran Island, Camotes Island, Capiz, Aklan, Boracay Island, Northern Cebu, Bantayan Island and Northern Negros; and the Mindanao province of Dinagat Island. Public storm warning #2 was also in effect for the Luzon provinces of Masbate and Romblon.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Son-tinh to move northwest across the Philippine islands into the South China Sea and make a landfall on the Vietnamese coastline.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 23, 2012

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of System 92W on Oct. 22 at 1:05 p.m. EDT › View larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of System 92W on Oct. 22 at 1:05 p.m. EDT that showed the strongest thunderstorms were fragmented in a band that were wrapping loosely into the center of circulation. Those thunderstorms are reaching high into the troposphere where cloud top temperatures are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Strength in Developing Tropical System 92W Approaching Philippines

Residents of the Philippines are preparing for another tropical system that appears to be getting organized on infrared satellite imagery from NASA. The low pressure area called System 92W is developing as it moves west through the Philippine Sea toward the Philippines.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of System 92W on Oct. 22 at 1:05 p.m. EDT that showed the strongest thunderstorms were fragmented in a band that were wrapping loosely into the center of circulation. Those thunderstorms are reaching high into the troposphere where cloud top temperatures are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

Today, Oct. 23, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, or PAGASA, issued a public storm warning in preparation for the approach of the low pressure area currently known as System 92W. PAGASA has already given the low its own designation in the Philippines and calls it "Tropical Depression Ofel."

PAGASA posed Public storm warning signal #1 for the Visayas province of Leyte, Southern Leyte, Eastern and Western Samar, Bohol and Camotes Island; also for the Mindanao provinces of Dinagat, Surigao Provinces. Agusan Provinces, Camiguin Island and Misamis Oriental.

At 1030 UTC (6:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 23, the center of System 92W was located near 8.6 north and 128.5 east, about 575 miles southeast of Manila, Philippines. It was moving to the west at 8 knots. A forecast track from the Philippines takes the storm into the east central Philippines in the next day or two.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.