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Hurricane Season 2012: Typhoon Saola (Western North Pacific Ocean)
8.02.12
 
 
AIRS captured this infrared image of Tropical Storms Damrey and Saola and Tropical Depression Haikui NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Saola dissipating in China. Click the picture above to see a larger image showing all three storms.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Triple Tropical Trouble in Northwestern Pacific

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of a very busy northwestern Pacific Ocean where three tropical cyclones are active. Tropical Storms Damrey and Saola are dissipating in China, while Tropical depression Haikui developed on August 3, 2012.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Pacific Ocean on August 3 at 0453 UTC (12:53 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured all three tropical cyclones in one image. AIRS observes in infrared light, which basically provides temperature information. In respect to tropical cyclones, the higher the thunderstorms (they're made up of hundreds of thunderstorms), the colder the clouds and stronger the thunderstorms.

AIRS data showed that cloud top temperatures in Damrey and Saola were warming, while Haikui had a large area of cooling cloud top temperatures. As Damrey made landfall north of Shanghai, China, it was cut off from its power source of warm water, so there was less water vapor to feed into the storm, and the uplift of air weakened (stronger uplift creates clouds and thunderstorms), so the cloud heights fell, and the cloud top temperatures warmed. The same thing occurred in Tropical Storm Saola when it made landfall south of Shanghai. Both storms appeared as tight, rounded areas over land in the AIRS image.

The AIRS image caught the western edge of Tropical Depression Haikui, and it showed a large area of very cold cloud top temperatures, indicating a lot of strength in uplift and strong, high thunderstorms. A good portion of Haikui's cloud top temperatures were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Those strong storms are indicative of areas where heavy rain is falling. Satellite imagery revealed that the low-level circulation center is partly exposed. There is also a fragmented, banding of thunderstorms wrapping from the northeast quadrant into the northwest quadrant of the storm.

The final warning for Tropical Storm Damrey was issued on August 2 at 2100 UTC, or 5 p.m. EDT. At that time, Damrey had already made landfall north of Shanghai, China, and was about 325 miles (374 miles/602 km) south-southeast of Beijing near 35.0 North latitude and 119.2 East longitude. Damrey's winds were still near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kmh) after landfall, but weakening as it moved in a west-northwest direction. Damrey's remnants are expected to dissipate today, August 3.

The final warning on Tropical Storm Saola came today, August 3 at 0300 UTC (Aug. 2 at 11 p.m. EDT) from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Saola had already made landfall south of Shanghai and north of Fuzhou, China, and is dissipating inland. At that time, it was centered near 27.0 North latitude and 119.3 East longitude. Saola's maximum sustained winds were less than Damrey's and near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kmh). Saola was also moving faster than Damrey (located to the north) at 14 knots (16 mph/26 kmh). Saola is expected to dissipate today or on August 4.

Out over the open waters of the northwestern Pacific Ocean, newborn Tropical Depression Haikui was getting organized. On August 3 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Haikui's maximum sustained winds were near 30 knots 34.5 mph/55.5 kmh). It was located 580 nautical miles east of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, and is moving to the west-northwest at 13 knots (~15 mph/24 kmh). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast calls for Haikui to pass just north of Kadena Air Base on August 5 and slowly intensify.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 2, 2012

MODIS captured a visible image on August 2, 2012 showing the southern arm of Damrey feeding into the northern arm of Saola › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite passed over both tropical cyclones and captured them in one image, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS captured a look at Tropical Storm Saola and Typhoon Damrey's cloud top temperatures on August 1, 2012 › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Saola and Typhoon Damrey's cloud top temperatures on August 1, 2012 at 1:23 p.m. EDT. Coldest cloud top temperatures (purple) were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellites See Tropical Storm Saola and Typhoon Damrey Arm-in-Arm Near China

Tropical Storm Saola and Typhoon Damrey appear on NASA satellite imagery to be arm-in-arm as they enter China on August 2.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over both tropical cyclones and captured them in one image, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard. MODIS captured a visible image on August 2, 2012 at 0245 UTC that showed the southern extent (or arm) of Typhoon Damrey, making landfall north of Shanghai, feeding into the northern extent (or arm) of Tropical Storm Saola, making landfall south of Shanghai. MODIS imagery also showed that Damrey developed an eye about 20 nautical miles (23 miles/27 km) wide, while Saola's eye had closed because of its interaction with the land of Taiwan.

On August 2 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Damrey was 160 nautical miles (184 miles/296 km) north-northeast of Shanghai, China, near 34.1 North latitude and 121.4 East longitude. Damrey's maximum sustained winds were near 75 knots (86.3 mph/138.9 kmh). Damrey continues moving west-northwest at 21 knots (24.1 mph/38.8 kmh). Cooling sea surface temperatures are expected to weaken Damrey as it nears the coast, but residents should be prepared for heavy rainfall, typhoon-force wind gusts, and rough surf.

The Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan has Sea and Land Warnings in effect today as Tropical Storm Saola continues moving west toward China and off the island. Sea Warning Areas include: the Sea of North Taiwan, Sea of Northeast Taiwan, Sea of Southeast Taiwan, North Taiwan Strait, and South Taiwan Strait. The Land Warning Area includes: Taipei City, New Taipei City, Keelung, Yilan County, Taoyuan County, Hsinchu County, Hsinchu City, Miaoli County, Taichung City, Changhua County, Nantou County, Yunlin County, Chiayi County, Chiayi City, Hualien County, Lienchiang County. For updated warnings in Taiwan, visit: http://www.cwb.gov.tw/V7e/prevent/warning/w40.htm.

On August 2 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Saola, called "Gener" in the Philippines, was just 10 nautical miles (11.5 miles/18.5 km) northeast of Taipei, Taiwan, near 25.6 North latitude and 121.3 East longitude. Saola's maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kmh). Damrey continues moving north-northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kmh). Usually when a tropical cyclone moves over land and is cut off from its "power supply" of warm ocean waters, as well as encountering the friction created as it moves over land.

Both systems are expected to dissipate within two days of making landfall.

For a high-resolution MODIS image: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Saola_Damrey.A2012215.0245.2km.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 1, 2012

MODIS captured this image of Saola approaching Taiwan, and Damrey approaching southern Japan on August 1 › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Saola approaching Taiwan, and Typhoon Damrey approaching southern Japan on August 1 at 0200 UTC (July 31 at 10:00 p.m. EDT.)
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS captured this image of showed Saola showing high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms (purple) approaching Taiwan › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Saola on August 1 at 0505 UTC (1:05 a.m. EDT) and the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. It showed that strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms (purple) approaching Taiwan and stretched over the northern Philippines.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Twin Typhoons Headed for Double China Landfall

NASA's Terra satellite captured two tropical cyclones on visible imagery today, August 1 as they head for landfall. Typhoon Saola is approaching Taiwan and Typhoon Damrey approaching southern Japan, are both headed for landfall in China. Saola is forecast to landfall south of Shanghai on August 3, while Damrey is forecast to make landfall north of Shanghai on August 2.

NASA satellites have been tracking the twin tropical troublemakers, providing forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with visible, infrared and microwave imagery. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Saola approaching Taiwan, and Typhoon Damrey approaching southern Japan on August 1 at 0200 UTC (July 31 at 10:00 p.m. EDT). Saola appeared much larger than the less intense Damrey. Saola also has an eye, although it was obscured by high clouds in the MODIS image.

On August 1 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Typhoon Damrey had maximum sustained winds near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kmh). It was centered 175 nautical miles (201.4 miles/324.1 km) southeast of Jeju-Do, Korea, near 31.3 North and 127.7 East. Damrey is moving to the west-northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kmh). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted today, August 1, "Infrared satellite imagery shows that there was persistent and deep spiral band convection over the low-level circulation center." Damrey is expected to weaken by Thursday, August 2 when it travels through an area of cooler sea surface temperatures off the coast of Shanghai, just before it makes landfall.

On August 1 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Saola had maximum sustained winds near 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kmh). Saola was centered 100 nautical miles (115.1 miles/185.2 km) southeast of Taipei, Taiwan near 24.2 North and 122.8 East. Saola is moving slowly to the north-northwest at 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.2 kmh). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted "satellite imagery shows deep convective banding continues to build around the low-level circulation center." The strongest thunderstorms were located north of the center of circulation.

Warnings for Saola are still in effect in the Philippines and are currently in effect in Taiwan. In the Philippines, Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for the provinces of Apayao and Cagayan in Luzon. Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect for the groups of islands of Batanes, Calayan and Babuyan.

In Taiwan, the cities of Taipei, New Taipei, Taichung, Chiavi, Tainan, Keelung, Hsinchu, and Kaosiung are under warning. In addition, warnings have been posted for the counties of Changhua, Chiayi, Hsinchu, Hualien, Lienchiang, Miaoli, Nantou, Taoyuan, Taitung, Yilan, and Yunlin.

Typhoon Saola is in an area more favorable for strengthening than Damrey, because sea surface temperatures around Saola are warmer than where Damrey is located. Because of the warmer sea surface temperatures and improving upper atmospheric conditions, forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Saola to continue intensifying over the next day before interacting with land and weakening. Saola is expected to make landfall south of Shanghai on August 3.

For an unlabeled, high-resolution MODIS image of the storms, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Saola_Damrey.A2012214.0200.2km.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 31, 2012

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Typhoon Saola's cloud top temperatures on July 30, 2012 at 1:20 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Typhoon Saola's cloud top temperatures on July 30, 2012 at 1:20 p.m. EDT. Coldest cloud top temperatures (purple) were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall affecting Taiwan and Luzon, Philippines.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Sees Typhoon Saola's Large Reach Over Taiwan and Philippines

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Typhoon Saola bringing heavy rain over two countries as it heads for a landfall in China later this week.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Saola on July 30, 2012 at 1:20 p.m. EDT the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument measured the cloud top temperatures, which clue forecasters into rainfall rates within a storm. Coldest cloud top temperatures that were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) were seen affecting Taiwan and Luzon, Philippines, indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall in both of those countries. On July 31, tightly curved bands of thunderstorms wrapped into the center of circulation from the north of the center. The strongest thunderstorms on July 31 appear to be south of the center.

As Saola continues to drench the northern Philippines, warnings remain in effect. The following warnings were still in effect on July 31: Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect in the following provinces of Luzon: Isabela, Kalinga, Apayao. Public storm warning signal #2 is still in effect in the Luzon province of Cagayan and the Calayan and Babuyan groups of islands. The Batanes group of islands is under Public storm warning signal #3.

Saola's maximum sustained winds are now near 100 knots (115 mph/185 kmh). On July 31 at 11 a.m. EDT, Saola was located near 22.1 North and 124.0 East, which is about 230 nautical miles (~265 miles/426 km) southeast of Taipei, Taiwan, has tracked northwestward slowly at 8 knots (9 mph/14.8 kmh), ensuring more heavy rain for Taiwan, as forecasters expect it to pass just north of the island over the next couple of days. Saola is also generating very rough seas in the Philippine Sea, with wave heights near 31 feet (9.4 meters).

Saola is expected to make final landfall in mainland China on Thursday, August 2 according to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 30, 2012

MODIS captured this image of Typhoon Saola approaching Taiwan on July 30 at 0215 UTC › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Saola (approaching Taiwan on July 30 at 0215 UTC (July 29 at 10:15 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS captured Typhoon Saola some 300 miles from Taiwan southwest over the Philippines. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Saola on July 30 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT) and the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. It showed that strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms (purple) extended from the center of circulation some 300 miles from Taiwan southwest over the Philippines.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Typhoon Saola's Huge Reach Over the Philippines

Typhoon Saola looks like a monster tropical cyclone in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite today, July 30. Although Saola's center is over 300 nautical miles (368 miles/592 km) south-southeast of Taiwan, it stretches over north and central Philippines and has triggered a number of warnings throughout the country.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Saola approaching Taiwan on July 30 at 0215 UTC (July 29 at 10:15 p.m. EDT). The image showed a ragged eye in the storm's center and the huge extent of the storm's clouds, stretching southwest over the Philippines. For a high resolution, unlabeled MODIS image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Saola.A2012212.0215.500m.jpg.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Saola a couple of hours after the Terra satellite. On July 30 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard the Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the storm. It showed that strong, high, cold cloud tops of thunderstorms extended from the center of circulation some 300 miles from Taiwan southwest over the Philippines. The eye of the storm appeared much clearer on the AIRS infrared imagery than on the visible MODIS imagery.

On July 30, the following warnings were posted in the Philippines: Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for the following provinces of Luzon: Apayao, Isabela, and Kalinga. Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect for the Luzon province of Cagayan and the Babuyan and Calayan groups of islands. Public storm warning signal #3 is in effect for the Batanes group of islands.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Saola to continue on a northwesterly track taking the center just north of Taipei, Taiwan on Wednesday, August 2. That means strong winds, heavy rainfall, and very rough coastal conditions for Taiwan.

On July 30 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Saola had maximum sustained winds near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kmh). It was centered 320 nautical miles (368 miles/592.6 km) south-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan near 20.6 North and 124.6 East. Saola is moving slowly to the northwest at 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.2 kmh), meaning more rainfall for the Philippines and more potential for flooding.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Saola to continue intensifying over the next couple of days and will make landfall in mainland China sometime on Thursday, August 3.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 27, 2012

When MODIS pass overhead of System 93W on July 27, 2012 the center of the low appeared almost cloud-free. › View larger image
When NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on July 27, 2012 at 10:14 p.m. (local time/Manila, Philippines) the center of the low appeared almost cloud-free, while broken bands of thunderstorms appeared to surround it from north to west to south.
Credit: NASA/NRL
NASA Sees Organizing Tropical Low Pressure Area Near the Philippines

A low pressure system in the western North Pacific has caught the eye of forecasters and several satellites as it continues to organize. NASA's Terra satellite captured a view of System 93W's clouds as they continue to appear more organized.

System 93W appears poised to become tropical storm Saola over the next two days if the organization continues. At 1400 UTC (10 a.m. EDT/U.S.; 10 p.m. Asia/Manila local time) System 93W had maximum sustained winds near 20 knots (23 mph/37 kmh). It was located about 395 nautical miles (454.6 miles/731.5 km) east-southeast of Manila, the Philippines, near 12.7 North latitude and 127.6 East longitude.

When NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on July 27, 2012 at 1414 UTC (10:14 a.m. EDT/U.S.; 10:14 p.m. local time/Manila, Philippines) the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured an infrared image of the low pressure area. The center of the low appeared almost cloud-free, while broken bands of thunderstorms appeared to surround it from north to west to south. The northeastern side of the storm appeared to be lacking in clouds.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that "upper level analysis indicates the vertical wind shear has weakened as the storm motion became in-phase with the upper level winds." Weaker wind shear enables a low pressure area to strengthen, because it is not being battered by outside winds. In addition, sea surface temperatures are warm enough to contribute to the formation of a tropical depression (over 26.6 Celsius/80 Fahrenheit).

As a result of the weaker wind shear and improved banding of thunderstorms around the low's center, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center gave System 93W a "high chance" for becoming a tropical depression over the weekend of July 28-29.

Meanwhile, another low pressure system in the western North Pacific has a medium chance for development into a tropical depression. That low is located about 360 nautical miles (414 miles/666.7 km) east of Iwo-To, Japan, near 24.3 North and 147.8 East. On July 27, the showers and thunderstorms were being pushed to the east of the center due to wind shear.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
 
 
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http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2012/h2012_Saola.html