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Tropical Storm Rosa (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
11.05.12
 
Image from GOES-15 animation shows Tropical Storm Rosa develop off the west coast of Mexico and battered by wind shear by Nov. 5. › View full size image
› View GOES-15 Animation
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite data was used to create this animation of weather moving across the eastern Pacific Ocean from Oct. 26 through early morning on Nov. 5 (EDT). that shows Tropical Storm Rosa develop off the west coast of Mexico and be chased by System 99E. By Nov. 5, both are battered into dissipation by wind shear.
Photo Credit: NASA/GOES Project
Wind Shear Dissipates Tropical Storm Rosa and System 99E

Tropical Storm Rosa and the low pressure area called System 99E that trailed to Rosa's east were both done in by strong wind shear over the weekend of Nov. 3 and 4.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite data was used to create an animation of weather moving across the eastern Pacific Ocean from Oct. 26 through early morning on Nov. 5 (EDT) that showed Tropical Storm Rosa develop off the west coast of Mexico and be chased by System 99E. By Nov. 5, both were battered into dissipation by wind shear.

On Nov. 4, the final bulletin on post-tropical storm Rosa was issued by the National Hurricane Center at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). At that time, Rosa's maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.2 kph). It was far from land and located about 1,045 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 12.6 North latitude and 121.5 West longitude. It was crawling to the west at 1 knot (1.1 mph/1.8 kph) while being battered by strong upper-level westerly winds.

By Nov. 5, 2012, both post-tropical storm Rosa and System 99E had been torn apart.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Nov. 2, 2012 This image of Rosa was taken by MODIS when the storm was in its prime on Oct. 31 at 2:15 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Rosa was taken by NASA's Terra satellite when the storm was in its prime on Oct. 31 at 2:15 p.m. EDT. Rosa is an eastern Pacific storm that was at the time of this image being chased by low pressure System 99E (right). Wind shear has since weakened Rosa and has dissipated System 99E.
Photo Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
Tropical Storm Rosa Battling Wind Shear in E. Pacific

NASA satellites continue to provide valuable data to forecasters as Tropical Storm Rosa spins down in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

NASA's MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Rosa when the storm was in its prime on Oct. 31 at 2:15 p.m. EDT. The image showed powerful thunderstorms in the center of circulation. At the time of the image, Rosa was being chased by low pressure System 99E but wind shear has since weakened Rosa and has dissipated System 99E.

At 5 a.m. EDT on Nov. 2, Tropical Storm Rosa's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph (75 kph) and the National Hurricane Center expects weakening to depression status by Nov. 2. Rosa's center was located near latitude 13.3 north and longitude 118.5 west, about 870 miles (1,400 km) southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Rosa is expected to drift to the southwest and west over the weekend while weakening to a depression and remnant low pressure area.

Water vapor imagery suggests that strong upper-level westerly winds are cutting into the cyclone below the cirrus layer (high altitude clouds).and the deep-layer wind shear is estimated to be about 20 knots. The National Hurricane Center expects that wind shear to increase over the coming days and batter Rosa into remnant low status. As Rosa weakens, it is expected to curve to the northwest over open ocean.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Nov. 1, 2012 On Nov. 1, 2012, AIRS took an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Rosa (left) and System 99E (right). › View larger image
On Nov. 1, 2012 at 5:29 a.m. EDT the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Rosa (left) and System 99E (right). The bulk of Rosa's rainfall was southwest of the storm's center.
Photo Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Rosa's Rains Southeast of Center

Wind shear is pushing the bulk of Tropical Storm Rosa southeast of the storm's center, and that's evident on infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite. Meanwhile System 99E, that was trailing behind Rosa on Oct. 31, has now "given up the ghost" as a result of that same wind shear.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Rosa at 5:41 a.m. EDT (0951 UTC) on Nov. 1, 2012 the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument took an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Rosa and remnants of System 99E. The AIRS data showed the strongest convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) has been pushed southeast of Rosa's center as a result of northwesterly wind shear. The convection in that quadrant was strong because the air pushed cloud tops of those thunderstorms to the top of the troposphere where temperatures are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Those are also areas where heavy rain typically falls. AIRS data showed that Rosa had become more disorganized, and that the banding of thunderstorms around the center was not as well-defined.

At 11 a.m. EDT Nov. 1, the center of Tropical Storm Rosa was located near latitude 13.9 north and longitude 118.4 west, about 825 miles (1,345 km) southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Rosa had maximum sustained winds near 50 mph (85 kph) and was moving toward the west-southwest near 2 mph (4 kph). Rosa is expected to drift to the southwest and weaken over the next couple of days.

The low pressure area called System 99E that lies east of Rosa was also affected by wind shear and is no longer suspect for tropical development.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Oct. 31, 2012 AIRS image of Rosa › View larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Rosa (left) and developing System 99SE (right). The strongest storms with coldest cloud top temperatures appear in purple. The purple indicates temperatures as cold as -63F (-52C).
Photo Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Rosa Being Born and Powering Up Quickly

The seventeenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed early on Oct. 30 and quickly strengthened into Tropical Storm Rosa the same day. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed strong convection in the storm's center that hinted at further intensification as low pressure System 99E appeared to be struggling to Rosa's east.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Depression 17E at 5:41 a.m. EDT (0951 UTC) on Tuesday, Oct. 30, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument took an infrared picture of the storm. The AIRS data showed a large, circular area of very strong convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) around the storm's center. Scientists identify the convection as strong, because the air pushes cloud tops of those thunderstorms to the top of the troposphere where temperatures are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). The AIRS data showed that those clouds were near that temperature, indicating they were high in the atmosphere, and when they're that high, they're powerful, and are typically indicative of heavy rainfall.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Rosa again on Oct. 31 at 0847 UTC (4:47 a.m. EDT) and captured an AIRS infrared image of the storm as well as the newly formed low pressure area called System 99E, that trails to Rosa's east. The infrared imagery showed a ring of strong thunderstorms around Rosa's center and north of System 99E's center.

At 8 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct. 30 the center of Tropical Storm Rosa was located near latitude 14.5 north and longitude 116.5 west and the storm had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph). By 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 31, Rosa's winds had increased to 50 mph and it had moved further west. At that time, it was located near 14.5 North and 117.6 West. Rosa was moving toward the west near 3 mph (6 kph). Rosa is expected to continue in that direction for next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center expects the storm to weaken on Nov. 1.

The low pressure area called System 99E trails to the east of Rosa. System 99E is a broad area of low pressure located about 450 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. System 99E continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms but the environment is not conducive for significant development, so the low pressure system has a 10 percent chance of development.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center