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Typhoon Prapiroon (Western North Pacific Ocean)
10.19.12
 
Prapiroon on Oct. 19 at 01:15 UTC, about 270 nautical miles southeast of Tokyo, Japan and moving away. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Extra-tropical Storm Prapiroon on Oct. 19 at 01:15 UTC (Oct. 18, 9:15 p.m. EDT), about 270 nautical miles southeast of Tokyo, Japan and moving away.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
NASA Sees Extra-Large, Now Extra-Tropical Storm Prapiroon Fading

Prapiroon is both extra-large and now extra-tropical in the western North Pacific Ocean. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the large storm after Prapiroon became extra-tropical.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Extra-tropical Storm Prapiroon on Oct. 19 at 01:15 UTC (Oct. 18, 9:15 p.m. EDT). The storm appeared on the MODIS image to be as large as the main island of Japan and the strongest thunderstorms and heaviest rainfall appeared north of the center of circulation over the open waters of the western North Pacific Ocean.

At 0300 UTC on Oct. 19 (11 p.m. EDT on Oct. 18), Prapiroon's maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (51.7 mph/81.3 kph). It was centered about 270 nautical miles (310.7 miles/500 km) southeast of Tokyo, Japan, near 31.9 North latitude and 142.6 East longitude. It was moving away from Japan and headed east-northeast at 27 knots (31 mph/50 kph).

On Oct. 19, Prapiroon marked its twelfth day of life. It was born as Tropical Depression 22W on Oct. 7. On Monday, Oct. 8, the twenty-second tropical cyclone had organized and strengthened into Tropical storm Prapiroon and later became a typhoon. Now, as an extra-tropical cyclone, Prapiroon is expected to fade over the next couple of days over open waters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 18, 2012

Some powerful thunderstorms around Prapiroon's center were still reaching heights above 12 kilometers (~7.6 miles). › View larger image
Prapiroon's winds had dropped to less than 35 knots (~40 mph) when the TRMM data were collected. Despite the drop in wind speed, some powerful thunderstorms around Prapiroon's center were still reaching heights above 12 kilometers (~7.6 miles).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Very Heavy Rains in Fading Tropical Storm Prapiroon

Heavy rainfall returned to Typhoon Prapiroon for a brief time on Oct. 18 when NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead. Prapiroon is battling strong wind shear and is expected to transition into an extra-tropical storm in the next day.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured rainfall data on Prapiroon twice on Oct. 18 when it passed overhead. The first orbit was at 0845UTC and the second at 1019 UTC. TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data show that rain associated with Prapiroon was falling at a rate of over 75mm/hour (~3 inches) in a feeder band northwest of the center of circulation.

Some of the rainfall occurring over Japan on Oct. 18 was being caused by a frontal system that was interacting with tropical Storm Prapiroon.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., Hal Pierce of the TRMM team created a 3-D image of the storm using TRMM PR data received with the 1019 UTC (6:19 a.m. EDT) orbit. Prapiroon was once a powerful typhoon with winds of 100 knots (~115 mph). Prapiroon's winds had dropped to less than 35 knots (~40 mph/65 kph) when the TRMM data were collected. Despite the drop in wind speed, some powerful thunderstorms around Prapiroon's center were still reaching heights above 12 kilometers (~7.6 miles).

By 1500 UTC on Oct. 18, Prapiroon's maximum sustained winds dropped near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). Tropical storm Prapiroon was, located approximately 325 nautical miles south-southwest of yokosuka, japan, near 30.9 North latitude and 138.9 East longitude. The storm has accelerated northeastward at 33 knots (38 mph/62 kph) .

Just five hours after the second TRMM satellite overpass, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that "animated infrared satellite imagery showed deep central convection has unraveled and sheared north of the low level circulation center."

Prapiroon is undergoing transitioning while battling strong wind shear and is expected to become extra-tropical by Oct. 19.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 17, 2012

MODIS image of Prapiroon › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Prapiroon on Oct. 17 at 0440 UTC (12:40 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Satellite Reveals Tropical Storm Prapiroon's Large Reach

Tropical Storm Prapiroon continues to move through the western North Pacific and the western side of the storm has blanketed many islands of Japan on its track to the northeast.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Prapiroon on Oct. 17 at 0440 UTC (12:40 a.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the satellite captured a visible image of the storm. The MODIS image showed that the western side of Prapiroon was blanketing the Ryukyu Islands of Japan, located west of Prapiroon's center. The Ryukyu islands are a chain of volcanic islands located southwest of Kyushu and include: Ōsumi, Tokara, Amami, Okinawa, and Sakishima Islands.

On Oct. 17, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Prapiroon had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was about 130 miles southeast of Kadena Air Base, which is on the island of Okinawa. Prapiroon's center was near 25.2 North and 129.7 East. The storm was moving to the northeast at 14 knots (16 mph/26 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction while transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone as it passes the south of Japan.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 16, 2012

TRMM image of Prapiroon › View larger image
The TRMM satellite flew above Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 15, 2012 at 0632 UTC (2:32 a.m. EDT). Prapiroon's sustained wind speeds had dropped to 70 knots (~81 mph) with a large and ragged eye (black) being its dominant feature. TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) data indicated that the most intense rain bands south of Prapiroon's eye were dropping rain at a rate of about 30-40 mm/hour (~1.2 to 1.6 inches).
Credit: NASA/SSAI Hal Pierce
NASA Satellite Indicates Tropical Storm Prapiroon's Rains Mostly South of Center

Tropical Storm Prapiroon is still meandering in the western north Pacific Ocean, and NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that dry air and wind shear are adversely affecting rainfall north of the storm's center.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew above Prapiroon when it was a typhoon on Oct. 15, 2012 at 0632 UTC (2:32 a.m. EDT). Prapiroon's sustained wind speeds had dropped to 70 knots (~81 mph) with a large and ragged eye being its dominant feature. TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) data indicated that the most intense rain bands south of Prapiroon's eye were dropping rain at a rate of about 30-40 mm/hour (~1.2 to 1.6 inches).

The erosion of the rainfall was still happening in satellite imagery on Oct. 16, and the bulk of the showers were occurring south of the center. Dry air has also been affecting the north side of the storm, and dry air absorbs the moisture that helps create the clouds and thunderstorms that make up the storm. The bands of showers and thunderstorms in the southern quadrant, however, are still strong.

On Oct. 16, 2012 at 1500 UTC, Tropical Storm Prapiroon, known as "Nina" in the Philippines, had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph). It was located near 22.2 North latitude and 129.3 East longitude, about 260 nautical miles (299 miles/481.5 km) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It was still moving slowly, just 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.2 kph) to the west. Prapiroon is still meandering until a mid-latitude shortwave trough (elongated area of low pressure) moving into central China can push it to the northeast.

Prapiroon is not expected to strengthen before it begins moving to the northeast on Oct. 17. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts the storm to become extra-tropical thereafter.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 15, 2012

3-D view of Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 12, 2012 and clearly shows the vertical structure of Prapiroon's precipitation. Click here for an animated flyby
This 3-D view of Typhoon Prapiroon was taken from the northwest on Oct. 12, 2012 and clearly shows the vertical structure of Prapiroon's precipitation. The strongest rainfall (50 mm/2 inches per hour) was found in the southeastern side of Prapiroon's eye wall.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Satellite Reveals Some Strong Rainfall in Meandering Typhoon Prapiroon

Typhoon Prapiroon has been meandering in the western North Pacific Ocean over the weekend of Oct. 13 and 14, and NASA's TRMM satellite was able to indentify where the strongest rainfall was occurring in the storm.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed directly above weakening Typhoon Prapiroon in the western Pacific Ocean on October 12, 2012 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT). At that time, Typhoon Prapiroon was a powerful category two typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale with winds slightly less than 95 knots (~109 mph).

A 3-D image of the storm was created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. using data on Oct. 12 gathered from TRMM's Precipitation Radar data. The view, taken from the northwest, clearly showed the vertical structure of Prapiroon's precipitation and cloud heights. The strongest rainfall was found in the southeastern side of Prapiroon's eye wall and was falling at a rate of 50 mm/2 inches per hour. Thunderstorm cloud tops in that vicinity were as high as 15 kilometers (9 miles), indicating strong storms. To see a flyby video of the Prapiroon in 3-D: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/trmm_rain/Events/prapiroon_12_october_2012_0741_utc_trmm_radar_animated.gif

On Oct. 15 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Prapiroon was still quasi-stationary. It was weaker, though, packing maximum sustained winds near 75 knots (86.3 mph/138.9 kph) and was located near 22.4 North latitude and 131.0 East longitude. That put the storm's center about 305 nautical miles (403 miles/648 km) southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan.

Satellite imagery on Oct. 15 showed that the cloud top temperatures around Prapiroon's eye had warmed, indicating that there was not as much power or uplift within the storm. Warming cloud top temperatures mean that the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone are lower in the atmosphere than they were before, and they're weaker than before.

After another day of meandering, Prapiroon is expected to start tracking to the north-northeast because a ridge (elongated area) of high pressure is building in from the east and its air flow in a clockwise direction, will push Prapiroon around it and toward the northeast. Once it starts moving, Prapiroon's center is expected to stay over open water. However, the storm's western fringes are expected to brush eastern Japan later in the week of Oct. 15.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 12, 2012

On Oct. 12 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT), TRMM showed light to moderate rainfall occurring over most of Prapiroon. › View larger image
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 12 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT), light to moderate rainfall (blue and green) was occurring over most of the storm at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was a small area of heavy rainfall (red) just south of the center where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Heaviest Rainfall Near Typhoon Prapiroon's Center

NASA measured light-to-moderate rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Prapiroon, with just a small area of heavy rain near the storm's center is it tracks through the western North Pacific Ocean.

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 12 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT), the precipitation radar instrument detected light to moderate rainfall occurring over most of the storm at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. The northwestern quadrant of the storm had the lightest rainfall rate.

There was a small area of heavy rainfall just south of the ragged eye where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. TRMM also noticed that the highest thunderstorms were almost 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) high in that same region of heavy rain.

In addition to dropping a lot of rain, Typhoon Prapiroon is churning up the seas around it. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that waves are as high as 41 feet (12.5 meters) in the vicinity of the storm.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 11, Typhoon Prapiroon's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (103 mph/166.7 kph). It was located near 20.3 North latitude and 129.4 East longitude, about 370 nautical miles (425.8 miles/685.2 km) south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Prapiroon is moving to the east-northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph) and is expected to continue moving over open ocean and in that general direction over the next couple of days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 11, 2012

MODIS image of Prapiroon › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 11 at 0210 UTC (1010 p.m. EDT, Oct. 10) and captured a visible image of the storm while it was in the Philippine Sea.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Typhoon Prapiroon Doing a "Sit and Spin" in the Philippine Sea

As Typhoon Prapiroon slowed down and became quasi-stationary in the Philippine Sea NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the storm.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 11 at 0210 UTC (1010 p.m. EDT, Oct. 10) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm. The visible imagery clearly showed a small ragged eye, and microwave satellite imagery confirmed the eye. Satellite imagery also confirmed a well-defined low-level center of circulation.

By 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 11, Prapiroon's maximum sustained winds were near 95 knots. It was located about 415 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, near 19.4 North and 128.5 East and not moving.

The storm slowed to a quasi-stationary position between two ridges (elongated areas) of high pressure. Prapiroon is expected to get a jump start again and get most of its steering influenced by the ridge located the east of the storm.

According to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, between [12 and 24 hours from 11 a.m. EDT on Oct 11] Prapiroon is expected to Slowly re-curve around the western extent of the subtropical ridge and take on a northeastward track over the next three days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 10, 2012

satellite image of Prapiroon › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 10 at 0435 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) and captured a visible image of the storm while it was in the Philippine Sea.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team

infrared image of Prapiroon ›View larger image
The AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this infrared image of Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 8 at 1653 UTC (12:53 p.m. EDT). The purple areas indicate the strongest thunderstorms that surrounded the center (rounded area) in all quadrants except the northwest.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Eyes Typhoon Prapiroon's U-Turn

Typhoon Prapiroon is making a U-turn in the Philippine Sea, changing direction from northwest to northeast. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the typhoon as it began turning. Visible satellite imagery revealed its most powerful thunderstorms south and east of the center.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 10 at 0435 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) and captured a visible image of the storm. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument was able to get a visible image of the typhoon, because it was 1:35 p.m. local Asia/Tokyo time (and night time on the U.S. East coast at 12:35 a.m. EDT). The MODIS imagery revealed a well-defined center with tightly curved bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center of the storm. That's the mark of a strong storm. Although Prapiroon's eye was not apparent in the visible MODIS image, it was in microwave imagery from another satellite instrument.

Typhoon Prapiroon's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kph) on Wed. Oct. 10 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT or 12 a.m. on Thurs. Oct. 11 Asia/Tokyo Time). Prapiroon's center was located about 470 nautical miles (541 miles/870.4 km) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, near 19.0 North and 129.6 East. The typhoon had already turned and was moving to the west-northwest at 7 knots (8 mph/12.9 kph).

Prapiroon made the U-turn because of a strong area of elongated high pressure called a ridge that is located south of Japan. The storm is moving around the southwestern edge of the high pressure area. Over the next several days, the storm is expected to intensify because it's in an area of low wind shear and warm waters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.









Oct. 9, 2012

NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Prapiroon in the Philippine Sea on Oct. 8 at 0140 UTC. › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Prapiroon in the Philippine Sea on Oct. 8 at 0140 UTC.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Eyes Typhoon Prapiroon Intensifying

Typhoon Prapiroon is the twenty-second tropical cyclone of the western North Pacific Ocean, making for a very active season. NASA's Terra satellite passed over the storm as it was intensifying into a typhoon and noticed very tight circulation with bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center.

Tropical Depression 22W was born on Oct. 7. On Monday, Oct. 8, the twenty-second tropical cyclone had organized and strengthened into Tropical storm Prapiroon. At that time it was located about 600 miles southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. The storm had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph) on Oct. 8.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Prapiroon in the Philippine Sea on Oct. 8 at 0140 UTC. It revealed a large band of strong thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the west and south.

The next day, Oct. 9, Prapiroon had become a typhoon with maximum sustained winds near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kph). It is expected to continue intensifying over the next several days. Prapiroon was located near 18.0 North and 131.8 East longitude, about 555 nautical miles (639 miles/1,028 km) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It is moving to the west-northwest at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). Because the storm slowed down, it has intensified. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite spotted an eye feature using microwave imagery.

Prapiroon is expected to continue moving west and then make a U-turn toward the northeast over the next day or two, while remaining over open ocean.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.