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Hurricane Paul (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
10.17.12
 
An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite from Oct. 16 to 18 › Click to view animation
An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite from Oct. 16 to 18.
Credit: NASA GOES-15
Satellite Movie Shows the End of Hurricane Paul

Hurricane Paul made landfall along Baja California on Oct. 17 and tracked north along the coast. As it moved north it continued to weaken. An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite from Oct. 16 to 18 shows Paul making landfall, moving up the coast and weakening to a remnant low pressure area while moving west and out to sea.

The animation was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

On Oct. 18, Paul's remnants continued to weaken and become absorbed into a larger-scale weak trough (elongated area) of low pressure , located north of 20 degrees North latitude, and between 115 and 130 West longitude . The eastern Pacific has seen the last of Hurricane Paul.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 17, 2012

MODIS image of Paul › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Paul over Baja California on Oct. 16 at 2025 UTC (4:25 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Paul Weakening Over Baja California

Satellite data from NASA shows that Paul is weakening as it tracks over Baja California.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Paul over Baja California on Oct. 16 at 2025 UTC (4:25 p.m. EDT). The image showed the eastern extent of Paul's cloud cover along the Mexico/Texas border and blanketing northwestern Mexico. The strongest storms appeared to be northeast of the center. Once a tropical storm interacts with land, it begins to weaken because it is cut off from the warm ocean waters that power it. The friction generated with a storm moves over land adversely affects the circulation of a storm, weakening it.

On Oct. 17, a Tropical Storm Warning was in effect from Santa Fe to El Pocito and from San Evaristo to Bahia San Juan Bautista. A Tropical Storm Watch was in effect from north of El Pocito to Punta Eugenia.

At 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 17, Paul weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph) and is expected to become a tropical depression later in the day. The center of tropical storm Paul was located near latitude 26.8 north and longitude 113.8 west, about 105 miles (170 km) southeast of Punta Eugenia Mexico. It is moving to the northwest near 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction for the next couple of days. Paul will finally move away from the Baja California peninsula later tonight and Thursday, Oct. 18.

Baja California is already experiencing tropical storm force winds, and those are expected to spread northward as Paul moves in that direction. Paul is expected to produce additional rainfall amounts of 1 to 2 inches over the central Baja California peninsula with isolated amounts to 10 inches. Swells generated by Paul will continue to affect the west coast of the Baja California Peninsula and the coast of Sinaloa for the next day or so.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 16, 2012

satellite image of Paul › Larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Hurricane Paul off the west coast of Mexico on Oct. 15 at 1815 UTC (2:15 p.m. EDT). Socorro Island, Mexico, is the small outline northwest of the eye.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Hurricane Paul 'Eye' Mexico's Socorro Island, Coastline

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a stunning image of Hurricane Paul in the eastern Pacific Ocean that revealed Mexico's Socorro Island was just outside of Paul's eye. Now, Paul is expected to track along the Baja California coast, triggering more warnings.

Hurricane Paul is stirring up rough seas in the eastern Pacific Ocean and warnings are posted along Baja California.

A hurricane warning is in effect for the west coast of Baja California from Santa Fe northward to Punta Abreojos. A tropical storm warning is in effect for the west coast of Baja California north of Punta Abreojos to El Pocito, south of Santa Fe to Agua Blanca, and on the east coast of Baja California from La Paz to Bahia San Juan Bautista. A tropical storm watch is also in effect for the west coast of Baja California North of El Pocito to Punta Eugenia.

Before Paul turned to mainland Mexico, the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Hurricane Paul off the west coast of Mexico on Oct. 15 at 1815 UTC (2:15 p.m. EDT). At that time, tiny Socorro Island, Mexico was just northwest of the eye.

Socorro Island is a small volcanic island and is one of the Revillagigedo Islands. It is located about 373 miles (600 kilometers) off Mexico's west coast and has an area of about 60 square miles (132 square kilometers). Socorro is being battered by hurricane-force winds and very rough surf.

On Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 8 a.m. EDT, Hurricane Paul's maximum sustained winds are near 110 mph (175 kph). Paul is a category two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

Paul's center was located near latitude 22.9 north and longitude 112.3 west. According to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), Paul has accelerated and is now moving toward the north-northeast near 21 mph (33 kph). NHC forecasters expect Paul's center to make landfall this afternoon, Oct. 16. A turn to the north with a decrease in forward speed is expected on Wednesday, Oct. 17.

Baja California can expect the same conditions that battered Socorro Island on Oct. 15: heavy rainfall, hurricane-force-winds, and rough surf. Rainfall between 2 and 4 inches with isolated amounts to 8 inches are expected, which can cause flash flooding and mudslides. Dangerous swells are expected to affect the Baja California coast for the next several days.

Hurricane Paul is forecast to track north over the coastline of Baja California over the next day before exiting back into the eastern Pacific on Oct. 17, just west of Central Desert Natural Park, Baja California.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 15, 2012

MODIS captured this image of Hurricane Paul on Oct. 13 just before it was a tropical storm off the west coast of Mexico. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Paul on Oct. 13 at 18:25 UTC (2:25 p.m. EDT) just before it was a tropical storm off the west coast of Mexico. Paul has since strengthened into a hurricane.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Watching Hurricane Paul, Warnings up for Baja California

Tropical cyclones seem to love forming over weekends, Rafael formed over the weekend in the Atlantic, Anais in the Southern Indian Ocean and Hurricane Paul in the eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Terra satellite kept on top of Paul, however, and provided forecasters with a visible look at the newborn storm.

Paul formed on Oct. 13 at 5 p.m. EDT about 660 miles (1,065 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near 14.0 North and 113.6 West.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Paul on Oct. 13 at 18:25 UTC (2:25 p.m. EDT) just before it was officially designated a tropical storm off the west coast of Mexico. The visible imagery showed powerful thunderstorms in a large, wide band wrapping around the storm from the north, around the western side and into the center from the southern quadrant. Paul has since strengthened into a hurricane.

On Monday, Oct. 15 at 11 a.m. EDT Paul strengthened into a hurricane and a Tropical Storm Warning was then posted for a part of the western coast of Baja California, Mexico.

A Tropical Storm Warning covers the west coast of the Baja Peninsula from Santa Fe northward to Puerto San Andresito, Mexico, and a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from north of Puerto San Andresito to El Pocito.

Paul had maximum sustained winds near 90 mph (150 kph). It is located about 495 miles (800 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico, near 17.3 North latitude and 114.7 West longitude. Paul is moving to the north at 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue for a day or two before turning to the north-northwest and away from land.

The National Hurricane Center expects Paul to bring dangerous surf and heavy rainfall to the Baja and tropical storm conditions by the afternoon hours on Oct. 16. Rainfall is expected between 2 and 4 inches with higher isolated totals.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.