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Tropical Cyclone Nilam (Northern Indian Ocean)
11.01.12
 
MODIS captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Nilam over southern India on Nov. 1 at 05:50 UTC › View larger image
The MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Nilam over southern India on Nov. 1 at 05:50 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Depression Nilam Blanket Southern India

After Tropical Cyclone Nilam made landfall in southeastern India NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and saw the storm's clouds blanket the entire southern portion of the country from Chennai southward.

On Nov. 1 at 05:50 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Nilam.

The MODIS image showed that Nilam's clouds stretched as far north as Andra Pradesh, a state in east central India. It covered the states of Goa and Karnataka in the west, all the way down to the states of Tamil Nadu, Puducherry and Kerala in extreme southern India.

On Oct. 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/8:30 p.m. local time, India), Nilam made landfall over southeastern India and started to elongate. When a system is no longer circular and starts to elongate, it begins to weaken.

India's Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) issued a bulletin on Tropical Depression Nilam on Nov. 1 at 2 a.m. EDT (11:30 a.m. local time/India). At that time, Nilam was centered over Rayalaseema. Rayalaseema is a geographic region in the state of Andhra Pradesh. The RSMC noted that Nilam is expected to move northwestward and weaken to a remnant low pressure area later on Nov. 1.

The RSMC expects heavy rainfall over Rayalaseema, Karnataka and south coastal Andhra Pradesh and north Tamilnadu on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 before the storm dissipates.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 31, 2012

infrared image of Nilam › View larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone Nilam on Oct. 29 at 2029 4:29 p.m. EDT. The strongest storms with coldest cloud top temperatures appear in purple and were covering Sri Lanka. The purple indicates temperatures as cold as -63F (-52C).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Eye Sees Tropical Cyclone Nilam Soak Sri Lanka

Tropical Storm 02B was renamed Tropical Cyclone Nilam when NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the storm soaking Sri Lanka on its crawl to a landfall in southern India. Nilam made final landfall in southern India on Oct. 31.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Nilam on Oct. 29 at 2029 4:29 p.m. EDT. At the time of the AIRS image, the strongest storms with coldest cloud top temperatures were covering Sri Lanka and stretched into the open waters of the Northern Indian Ocean. Cloud top temperatures in those areas were as cold as -63F (-52C) and are indicative of heavy rainfall.

On Oct. 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Nilam had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph). It was located about 35 nautical miles (40.2 miles/64.8 km) southeast of Chennai, India, near 12.9 North latitude and 794 East longitude and moving west-northwest at 12 knots (13.8 mph/22.2 kph).

Nilam's center made landfall over southern India early on Oct. 31 and the low-level center had become elongated, which is a sign the storm is weakening. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Nilam to dissipate over land in a day or two.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 29, 2012

AIRS captured the birth of Tropical Cyclone 02B on Oct. 29 at 0711 UTC that showed some strong thunderstorms › View larger image
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of the birth of Tropical Cyclone 02B on Oct. 29 at 0711 UTC (3:11 a.m. EDT) that showed some strong thunderstorms (purple) with cloud top temperatures as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Birth of Second Tropical Cyclone in No. Indian Ocean

Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite captured the birth of the second tropical cyclone in the Northern Indian Ocean as it heads for landfall on the African mainland. NASA satellite imagery showed that the cyclone was producing heavy rain from strong storms over northern Sri Lanka.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery of the birth of Tropical Cyclone 02B on Oct. 29 at 0811 UTC (4:11 a.m. EDT) that showed some strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall around the center of its circulation. The strongest thunderstorms were reaching high into the troposphere where cloud top temperatures are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) and at the time of the image were located over northern Sri Lanka and over open ocean.

On Oct. 29, Tropical Cyclone 02B (TC02B) had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). It was located near 9.0 North and 81.7 East, about 165 nautical miles (190 miles/305.6 km) northwest of Colombo, Sri Lanka. TC02B was moving to the west near 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction.

Infrared satellite imagery shows banding of thunderstorms, wrapped tightly into the low-level center of circulation, with the strongest storms north of the center. TC02B is tracking around the southwestern edge of a sub-tropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure, which circulates clockwise, thus pushing the cyclone west (as if moving from 5 to 7 o'clock on a clock).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast expects TC02B to intensify slightly before making landfall, and then dissipate quickly thereafter.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.