Featured Images

Text Size

Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Mawar (Western North Pacific Ocean)
06.06.12
 
TRMM rainfall data on Mawar indicated the strongest rainfall rates were occurring in the northwestern quadrant. › View larger image
TRMM passed over Mawar at 0319 UTC, which translates into 11:19 p.m. EDT on June 5. TRMM captured rainfall data on Mawar and noticed the strongest rainfall rates were occurring in the northwestern quadrant, in a band of thunderstorms. The heaviest rainfall was falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour (red). Otherwise, most of the post-tropical storm had light to moderate rainfall (green and blue), falling at a rate between .78 and 1.57 inches/20 and 40 mm.
Credit: SSAI/Hal Pierce
Post Tropical Storm Mawar Spinning and Weakening in Western North Pacific

Typhoon Mawar was spotted by NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite as it weakened and continued moving past Japan today, June 6.

TRMM passed over Mawar at 0319 UTC, which translates into 11:19 p.m. EDT on June 5. TRMM captured rainfall data on Mawar and noticed the strongest rainfall rates were occurring in the northwestern quadrant, in a band of thunderstorms. The heaviest rainfall was falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Otherwise, most of the post-tropical storm had light to moderate rainfall, falling at a rate between .78 and 1.57 inches/20 and 40 mm.

Mawar was located east of the big island of Japan, and clouds from its western edge were grazing the eastern central coast of Japan. Its maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots as it continued to face wind shear. The wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures continue to have a weakening effect on the system. Mawar is expected to weaken over the next several days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




June 5, 2012
TRMM data showed Mawar was producing a very large area of rainfall southeast of Japan on June 5, 2012. › View larger image
TRMM data showed Mawar was producing a very large area of rainfall southeast of Japan on June 5, 2012. Most of Mawar's heavy rainfall is revealed by TRMM to be north of the dissipating tropical cyclone's center. The most intense surface rainfall of over 40mm/hr (~1.6 inches) was shown northeast of the center. Much of Mawar's southwestern side was shown becoming rain free. This 3-D image shows that Mawar no longer had an eye wall. Storms near Mawar's center of circulation were reaching to heights of only about 10km (~6.2 miles). The highest storm towers of over 11km (~6.8 miles) were located in a band far to the northwest of Mawar's center.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
AIRS captured infrared images from Mawar on June 4, 5, and 6 › View larger image
NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Mawar and the AIRS instrument captured infrared images from the storm on June 4, 5, and 6 as it expanded, strengthened, rained on the Philippines and headed north in the western North Pacific. Strongest thunderstorms appear in purple where high cloud top temperatures were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellites See Changes in Weakening Typhoon Mawar

NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Aqua satellites are just two in NASA’s fleet that have been providing data on the evolving and now devolving tropical cyclone. TRMM provided rainfall and other data, while the AIRS instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite provided cloud temperature and extent.

Typhoon Mawar was weakening when the TRMM satellite saw it during the daytime on June 5, 2012 at 0728 UTC (3:28 a.m. EDT/U.S.). Rainfall derived from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments showed that Mawar was producing a very large area of rainfall southeast of Japan. Most of Mawar's heavy rainfall is revealed by TRMM to be north of the dissipating tropical cyclone's center. The most intense surface rainfall of over 40mm/hr (~1.6 inches) was shown northeast of the center. Much of Mawar's southwestern side was shown becoming rain free.

A 3-D image from TRMM's PR shows that Mawar no longer had an eye wall. Storms near Mawar's center of circulation were reaching to heights of only about 10km (~6.2 miles). The highest storm towers of over 11km (~6.8 miles) were located in a band far to the northwest of Mawar's center.

NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Mawar and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared images from the storm on June 4, 5, and 6 as it expanded, strengthened, rained on the Philippines and headed north in the western North Pacific. Strongest thunderstorms where high cloud top temperatures were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). AIRS data now shows that Mawar is now becoming extra-tropical and is interacting with a frontal zone located south of Japan.

At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on June 6, Mawar’s maximum sustained winds were down to 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kph). It was located near 28.1 North and 133.5 East, about 110 nautical miles (126.6 miles/ 203.7 kph) north-northeast of Minamidaito, Japan. Mawar is moving northeast at 23 knots (26.4 mph/42.6 kph).

Mawar is expected to stay to the east of Japan and move between the big island and Chichi Jima and Iwo Two. It should continue tracking east-northeast while weakening.

The system is expected to complete extra-tropical transitioning sometime on June 6. It is expected to weaken because of wind shear increasing to greater than 40 knots (46 mph/84 kph) and cool sea surface temperatures, colder than 23 Celsius (73.4F). Sea surface temperatures of 26.6 C (80F) are needed to maintain a tropical cyclone. As Mawar continues moving east-northeast, Japan’s big island will likely experience rough surf along east-facing shores.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






June 4, 2012
Typhoon Mawar was captured by MODIS instrument on June 3, 2012 at 0220 UTC. › View larger image
This visible image of Typhoon Mawar was captured by the MODIS instrument onboard NASA’s Aqua satellite on June 3, 2012 at 0220 UTC. By this time, the eye had become obscured by clouds.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
TRMM shows that Mawar had a distinct eye on June 4, 2012 before high clouds began to cover it. › View larger image
This daylight view of the category three typhoon shows that Mawar had a distinct eye on June 4, 2012 before high clouds began to cover it.. A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Image (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments shows a large area of heavy rainfall in the eastern side. TRMM shows that the northwestern quadrant of the typhoon was drier with very little rainfall occurring in that area. TRMM also shows that a very intense line of heavy rainfall was being fed into the southeastern side of the typhoon. The area of moderate to heavy rainfall appears in red, where rain is falling at over 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Light to moderate rainfall was falling at a rate between .78 inches and 1.57 inches per hour (20 to 40 mm).
Credit: NASA/TRMM/SSAI, Hal Pierce This animation of Typhoon Mawar shows a blend between a combination TRMM Visible/Infrared image and a TMI and PR rainfall analysis. › View TRMM animation
This animation of Typhoon Mawar shows a blend between a combination TRMM Visible/Infrared image and a TMI and PR rainfall analysis. It shows data from June 4, 2012. The area of moderate to heavy rainfall appears in red, where rain is falling at over 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Light to moderate rainfall was falling at a rate between .78 inches and 1.57 inches per hour (20 to 40 mm).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA Looks At Typhoon Mawar, Now Heading to Sea

Over the weekend of June 2 and 3, Typhoon Mawar skirted the east coast of the Philippines bringing heavy surf, heavy rainfall and gusty winds that led to several missing and injured people. NASA’s TRMM satellite and Aqua satellite showed heavy rainfall and cloud extent of the storm.

On June 1, Mawar (known as Ambo in the Philippines) had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots and it was about 245 miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines. On that day, as Mawar continued north, some warnings were posted for the Philippines: Public storm warning signal #1 was up in the Luzon provinces of Catanduanes, Camarines Sur, Camarines Norte, Polillo Island, Aurora, Isabela and Cagayan.

On June 2, more warnings were posted in the Philippines. They include: Public storm warning signal #1 in the Luzon provinces of Isabela and Cagayan including Babuyan Island; and Public storm warning signal #2 was in effect in the Luzon areas of Batanes Group of Islands and Calayan Island.

According to Sunstar news, Manila, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) said that 9 people were injured in Natonin, Mt. Province after their car fell into a ravine. Two others were injured from a landslide. Elsewhere, several people were reported missing.

By June 2, Mawar was already departing the Philippines and was 500 miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa as its maximum sustained winds reached 80 knots (92 mph/148.2 kph) and it was classified a typhoon. Mawar intensified to typhoon strength when it was about 160.9 km (~100 miles) from Luzon. Flooding from Mawar caused at least three deaths in the Philippines even though the typhoon didn't make landfall.

It later grew in strength to 95 knots (109.3 mph/180 kph), and maintained strength as it headed northeast, until 2100 UTC on June 3, when it was being battered by wind shear. At that time, maximum sustained winds dropped back to 80 knots (92 mph/148.2 kph).

By June 4, 2012 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT) wind shear had relaxed from battering Mawar and its maximum sustained winds increased back up to 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kph). Tropical-storm-force winds extended out from the center as far as 155 miles (249.4 km), making the storm over 300 miles (499 km) in diameter. The typhoon-force winds, however, we confined to 35 miles (56.3 km) out from the center (about 70 miles in diameter). It was near 23.3 North and 127.4 East, about 185 miles south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Mawar continued moving north-northeast near 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph) and it was generating very rough seas, with wave heights reaching 34 feet (10.3 meters)!

A daylight view from NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite showed Mawar had a distinct eye on June 4, 2012 before high clouds began to cover it. A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Image (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments showed a large area of heavy rainfall in the eastern side. TRMM shows that the northwestern quadrant of the typhoon was drier with very little rainfall occurring in that area. TRMM also showed that a very intense line of heavy rainfall was being fed into the southeastern side of the typhoon.

Satellite imagery also showed that convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the storm) and thunderstorms are disorganized. In addition, wind shear appears to be returning and the storm appears to be elongating. Atmospheric conditions are now becoming increasingly hostile and the storm will continue to weaken. Forecasters expect Mawar will become an extra-tropical storm south of Japan by mid-week.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.









June 1, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over tropical storm Mawar on May 31 at 1705 UTC (1:05 p.m. EDT). › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over tropical storm Mawar on May 31 at 1705 UTC (1:05 p.m. EDT). The image showed improved deep (purple) convection (rising air that form the thunderstorms that make up the tropical depression) wrapping into its low-level circulation center.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Satellite Imagery Shows Tropical Storm Mawar Strengthening

The infrared instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured temperature data on Tropical Storm Mawar in the western North Pacific Ocean and showed that the cloud top temperatures were growing colder. That's an indication that the thunderstorms within are higher and stronger - a sign of strengthening.

By June 1, 2012 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT), System 95W organized into Tropical Storm Mawar. It had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph) at that time. It was located about 245 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines, near 15.9 North and 124.9 East. It was moving to the northeast at 8 knots (9 mph/14.8 kph) and generating 13-foot (3.9 meter) high waves.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead, data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) gathered infrared data. The image showed improved deep convection (rising air that form the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm) wrapping into its low-level circulation center.

The AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The coldest cloud temperatures are located around Mawar's center. Those areas have some of the strongest storms. Scientists use the AIRS data to create an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters. AIRS' infrared signal doesn't penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Forecasters expect Mawar is going to follow a boomerang-shaped path in the western North Pacific, and its outer bands may just graze the east coast of Luzon, Philippines. The main threat from 04W is rough surf along the east-facing coasts of the Philippines over the next several days. By June 4, Mawar is forecast to reach typhoon strength with maximum sustained winds near 85 knots (98 mph/157.4 kph) before weakening.

On June 4 and 5, it is expected to bring rainfall and rough surf to Kadena, southern Japan, Iwo To and Chichi Jima but is expected to weaken by June 5 due to increased wind shear and cooler water temperatures.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



May 31, 2012
On May 31, AIRS showed low-level circulation center is consolidating. › View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument data showed on May 31 at 0453 UTC that System 95W's low-level circulation center is consolidating and showing improved deep convective banding (of thunderstorms) and increased central convection. The Philippines are shown to the left of System 95W.
NASA Infrared Imagery Hints at Developing Tropical Cyclone

The low pressure area called System 95W appears more organized on NASA infrared satellite imagery today, May 31.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 95W in the western North Pacific Ocean on May 31 and infrared satellite imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument shows that the low-level circulation center is consolidating and showing improved deep convective banding (of thunderstorms) and increased central convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone).

System 95W has maximum sustained winds near 20 knots (23 mph/37 kph). It is located near 10.9 North and 130.1 East, about 220 nautical miles (253 miles/407.4 km)east of Samar Island, Philippines.

The computer model guidance is consistent and also unanimous in the development of a tropical depression in the next day or two.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.