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Tropical Storm Maria (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
10.19.12
 
Image of Maria on Oct. 19 created by combining JAXA's MTSAT imagery with rainfall data from NASA's TRMM satellite. › View larger image
This image was of a faded Tropical Depression Maria on Oct. 19 was created by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center combining JAXA's MTSAT imagery with rainfall data from NASA's TRMM satellite and shows no precipitation left in Maria.
Credit: Joint Typhoon Warning Center
NASA's TRMM Satellite Saw Tropical Depression Maria's Demise

Heavy and moderate rainfall was missing when NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Depression Maria on Oct. 19. TRMM noticed just a small area of light rain falling in Maria's southwestern quadrant.

In image created on Oct. 19, 2012, by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center using TRMM data and infrared imagery from the Japanese Space Agency's MT-SAT satellite, very light precipitation appeared to be falling only in Tropical Depression Maria's southwestern quadrant at a rate of 0.10 inch per hour/2.5 mm per hour.

The last bulletin about Maria was issued at 0900 UTC on Oct. 19 from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. At that time, Maria was a tropical depression and was located near 31.2 North and 158.8 East, about 830 miles north-northwest of Wake Island. Maria was moivng to the east at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph) and had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). The storm is expected to dissipate later on Oct. 19.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 18, 2012

TRMM saw that rain associated with Tropical Storm Maria was limited to east of the storm's center, and was light to moderate › View larger image
On Oct. 18 at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT), NASA's TRMM satellite saw that rain associated with Tropical Storm Maria was limited to east of the storm's center, and was light to moderate (pictured in green and blue) and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Strong Wind Shear Adversely Affect Tropical Storm Maria

Tropical Storm Maria is moving away from Japan and strong wind shear is pushing its rainfall east of the storm's center, according to NASA satellite imagery.

On Oct. 18 at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT), NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite saw that rain associated with Tropical Storm Maria was limited to the east of the storm's center. Rainfall was also light to moderate, falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There were no areas of heavy rain remaining in the tropical cyclone. The low-level center of the storm is now exposed and a wind shear greater than 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph) continues to further weaken the storm.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Oct 18, Maria's maximum sustained winds were down to 35 knots (~40 mph/65 kph) and weakening. It was located near 31.9 North and 155.6 East, about 780 nautical miles east of Tokyo, Japan. It was moving to the east and into the open waters of the northern Pacific at a speed of 14 knots (16 mph/26 kph).

By Oct. 19, the combination of the strong wind shear with cooler sea surface temperatures are expected to make Maria dissipate.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 17, 2012

TRMM image of Maria › View larger image
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maria on Oct. 17 at 0939 UTC (5:39 a.m. EDT on Oct. 16), it showed a concentrated area of light to moderate rainfall (green and blue) northeast of the center, falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Spots Tropical Storm Maria's Rainfall Pushed Away from Center

NASA satellite data revealed a concentrated area of moderate rainfall northeast of Tropical Storm Maria's center when it passed over the western North Pacific Ocean earlier today, Oct. 17.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maria on Oct. 17 at 0939 UTC (5:39 a.m. EDT on Oct. 16), it was producing a concentrated area of light to moderate rainfall northeast of Maria's center, falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. Microwave satellite imagery showed that the central convection was displaced northeast of the low level circulation center, indicating that strong southwesterly wind shear was affecting the storm.

Winds from the southwest were blowing between 20 and 30 knots (23 to 34.5 mph/ 37 to 55.6 kph) and were battering Maria, and pushing most of the rainfall away from the storm's center circulation.

On Oct. 17 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Maria had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/81.3 kph). It was located about 440 nautical miles southeast of Tokyo, Japan, near 28.2 North and 142.2 East. Maria was moving to the northeast at 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kph) and is expected to weaken as it turns east.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Maria to dissipate over cooler waters by Oct. 19.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 17, 2012

MODIS image of Maria › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Maria in the northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 16 at 0355 UTC (Oct. 15 at 11:55 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA: How Do You Solve a Problem Like (Tropical Storm) Maria?

The song "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" from the famous film "The Sound of Music" comes to mind when looking at NASA satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Maria churning in the western North Pacific Ocean. The answer lies in increased wind shear and cool ocean temperatures – two factors that can weaken the storm, but won't be present over the next day or two.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maria on Oct. 16 at 0355 UTC, 12:55 p.m. local time Tokyo/Japan (Oct. 15 at 11:55 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm when it was approaching Iwo To, Japan. The image shows that Maria had a strong circulation with bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center from the south and east and into the center from the north.

On Oct. 16 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Maria had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). It had passed Iwo To and was located about 135 nautical miles (155 miles/250 km) north of the island, moving north-northeast at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph).

Although increased wind shear and cooler waters would weaken Maria, neither of those factors will be present over the next couple of days as the storm moves to the north-northeast over open waters. In fact, on Oct. 16, a satellite image from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite showed that the center is consolidating and that bands of thunderstorms are more tightly curved around the center. The TRMM data also revealed an eye feature.

Maria is moving around a ridge (elongated area) of high pressure. High pressure circulates in a clockwise direction, and Maria is on the western side of the high, so it will be curving to the northeast as it continues moving around. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects that Maria may become extra-tropical in three days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 15, 2012

When TRMM passed over Maria on Oct. 15 rainfall  was occurring at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/hour. › View larger image
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maria on Oct. 15 at 1329 UTC (9:29 a.m. EDT), light to moderate rainfall was occurring northeast of the center and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was a small area of heavy rain (red) falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Mostly Moderate Rainfall in Tropical Storm Maria

Tropical Storm Maria was born in the western North Pacific Ocean and has a large area of moderate rainfall, as NASA's TRMM satellite revealed today, Oct. 15. NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that most of Maria's rainfall was occurring northeast of the storm's center. Maria is the twenty-third tropical cyclone of the western North Pacific season.

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maria on Oct. 15 at 1329 UTC (9:29 a.m. EDT) light to moderate rainfall was occurring northeast of the center and falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was also a small area of heavy rain falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour.

Tropical Storm Maria had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots on Monday, Oct. 15 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). Maria was located near 22.7 North and 141.1 East, about 120 miles south of Iwo To, Japan. Maria was moving to the north at 18 knots.

The forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Maria's center to be closest to Iwo To between 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) on Oct. 15 and 0000 UTC on Oct. 16 (10 p.m. EDT, Oct. 15). Maria is headed north and is expected to intensify before heading northeast and becoming extra-tropical.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.