Feature

Text Size

Tropical Storm Maliksi (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
10.04.12
 
a large bluish blob threatens japan  in this infrared image of a tropical storm NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maliksi on Oct. 4 at 0329 UTC (11:29 p.m. EDT, Oct. 3, EDT) and captured an infrared image of the storm brushing northern Japan. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
› Larger image
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Maliksi Put Final Touches on Japan

Tropical Storm Maliksi is putting the final touches on Japan, that is, the edge of the storm was seen brushing the country's northern coast as it pulled away on NASA satellite imagery.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maliksi on Oct. 4 at 0329 UTC (11:29 p.m. EDT, Oct. 3, EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of the storm brushing the Tohoku and Hokkaido prefectures of northern Japan.

On Oct. 4, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final advisory on Maliksi. At that time it had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was centered near 32.6 North and 144.8 East, about 330 nautical miles (380 miles/611 km) southeast of Yokosuka, Japan. Maliksi was moving to the north-northeast at a speedy 32 knots (37 mph/59 kph).

Wind shear from the southwest has pushed most of the showers and thunderstorms northeast of the center of circulation, as was visible in the AIRS imagery.

The storm is becoming extra-tropical and is expected to become a cold core storm (instead of a warm core tropical cyclone) later in the day on Oct. 4.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 3, 2012

AIRS image of Maliksi› Larger image
The AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical storm Maliksi on Oct. 2, 2012 at 11:47 p.m. EDT. Strongest thunderstorms appeared east of the center of circulation, where cloud-top temperatures were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Strongest Side of Tropical Storm Maliksi

NASA's Aqua satellite took an infrared "picture" of Tropical Storm Maliksi in the western North Pacific Ocean and identified the strongest part of the storm being east of its center.

On Oct. 3 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical storm Maliksi had maximum sustained winds of 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was located about 470 nautical miles (541 miles/870.4 km) south-southeast of Tokyo, Japan, near 29.4 North and 143.1 East. Maliksi was speeding to the north-northeast at 21 knots (24.1 mph/38.8 kph).

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical storm Maliksi on Oct. 2, 2012 at 1547 UTC (11:47 p.m. EDT). Strongest thunderstorms appeared east of the center of circulation, where cloud-top temperatures were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). On Oct. 3, the strongest thunderstorms and deepest convection were still only occurring east of the center of circulation, with the exception of some limited convection (rising air that form thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) near the center.

The tropical storm is in an area of strong vertical wind shear, which will continue to weaken it. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted today, Oct. 3, that Maliksi is starting to look extra-tropical. Maliksi is forecast to remain at sea, and track to the north-northeast over the next several days during its transition.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 02, 2012

When TRMM satellite passed over Maliksi on Oct. 2 at 8:06 a.m. EDT, light rainfall (blue) was occurring over most of the storm. › View larger image When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maliksi on Oct. 2 at 1206 UTC (8: 06 a.m. EDT), light rainfall (blue) was occurring over most of the storm. The heaviest rainfall was moderate (green and orange) was falling east of the center at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was a small area of heavy rainfall (red) just east of the center where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Heaviest Rainfall in Tropical Storm Maliski's Eastern Side

Wind shear is pushing the heaviest rainfall within Tropical Storm Maliksi east of the storm's center, and NASA's TRMM satellite captured it on Oct. 2 as it passed overhead from space.

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Maliksi on Oct. 2 at 1206 UTC (8:06 a.m. EDT), the precipitation radar instrument detected light rainfall occurring over most of the storm. The heaviest rainfall was moderate was falling east of the center at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was a small area of heavy rainfall just east of the center where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

TRMM also noticed that the highest thunderstorms were about 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) high in that same region of heavy rain. Microwave satellite imagery has shown that the storm has become less organized during the morning hours of Oct. 2 because it has become slightly elongated.

On Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical storm Maliksi had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was located 200 nautical miles (230 miles/370 km) south-southeast of Iwo-To, Japan near 22.0 North and 141.9 East. Maliksi was moving to the north-northwest at 6 knots (7 mph/11 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast shows that Maliksi will track northwest towards Iwo To and strengthen. Once Maliksi passes Iwo To it is expected to move to the northeast and become extra-tropical.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 1, 2012

AIRS infrared image from Oct. 1 at 02:53 UTC as Tropical Depression 20W was strengthening into tropical storm Maliksi. › View larger image
This infrared image was created from AIRS data on Oct. 1 at 02:53 UTC (10:53 p.m. EDT, Sept. 30) as Tropical Depression 20W was strengthening into tropical storm Maliksi. Strongest thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) appear in purple.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Maliksi Forms, Iwo To on Guard

The western North Pacific is in full swing, tropically speaking and NASA observed the birth of Tropical Storm Maliksi on Sept. 30. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the storm when it was a depression and revealed a large area of powerful thunderstorms around its center that hinted at its strengthening.

Tropical Storm Maliksi formed from the twentieth tropical depression of the western North Pacific typhoon season. Tropical Depression 20W formed on Sept. 20 about 305 nautical miles from Guam near 16.3 North and 149.0 East. It is moving to the north-northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

On Oct. 1 the depression strengthened into a tropical storm. At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) it was located near 19.3 North and 145.1 East about 50 nautical miles (57.5 miles/92.6 km) northwest of Pagan, in the Northern Marianas archipelago. It is under the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. It had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). The Marianas Islands are an arc-shaped archipelago. The island chain includes fifteen volcanic mountains.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 20W in the western North Pacific, it captured an infrared image with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on Oct. 1 at 02:53 UTC (10:53 p.m. EDT, Sept. 30). A large area of powerful thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) surrounded the center of circulation, hinting that the storm was organizing and strengthening. It became a tropical storm hours after the image was taken.

Maliksi has organized during the morning hours of Oct. 1, with strongest convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms) and bands of thunderstorms over the southeastern quadrant. Those bands of thunderstorms, however, have not yet begun wrapping into the low level center, which is an indication that the storm still has a way to go to get fully organized.

Maliksi is expected to pass Iwo To during October 3 and strengthen into a typhoon on its journey to the northeast.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.