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Hurricane Season 2012: Hurricane Lane (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
09.19.12
 
GOES image of Lane› Larger image
On Sept. 19 at 11:45 a.m. EDT, GOES-15 captured an image of post-tropical Lane's remnants over 1,000 miles from Baja California, in an extensive field of stratocumulus clouds. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Satellite Sees Post-Tropical Cyclone Lane Fizzle in a Blanket of Low Clouds

Former Hurricane Lane has fizzled and its remnant circulation was spotted in a blanket of low clouds in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite sits in a fixed orbit over the western U.S. and captures continuous visible and infrared imagery of the western U.S. and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. On Sept. 19 at 11:45 a.m. EDT, GOES-15 captured a visible image of post-tropical Lane's remnants that appear as a small circulation center. The center was located over 1,000 miles from Baja California in an extensive field of stratocumulus clouds. Stratocumulus clouds are usually found below 8,000 feet (2,400 meters), and are shallow clouds that do not grow vertically because of stable, drier air above. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Wed. Sept. 19, 2012 post-tropical cyclone Lane had maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and winds were weakening as a result of the low pressure area being over waters too cool to maintain it. Sea surface temperatures in the region where Lane's remnants were located are colder than 22 degrees Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit). In order to maintain a tropical cyclone, sea surface temperatures of 26.6 Celsius (80 Fahrenheit) are needed.

Lane was centered about 1,380 miles west of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 20.9 North latitude and 131.3 West longitude. The low was moving to the west near 5 knots, and the National Hurricane Center expects Lane's remnants to continue moving west.

Lane was a post-tropical remnant low pressure area on Sept. 19 and is expected to continue steadily weakening and should dissipate into a trough (elongated area) of low pressure on Thursday, Sept. 21.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 18, 2012

MODIS image of Sanba
› Larger image
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific on Sept. 17 at 3:25 p.m. EDT the satellite captured a close-up of Hurricane Lane. Lane's eye appears obscured by clouds, and towering thunderstorms are wrapped tightly around the center of circulation. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Hurricane Lane Punched in the Eye

Powerful thunderstorms wrapped tightly around Hurricane Lane's center as it continued moving through the eastern Pacific Ocean. When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Lane it captured a close-up view of the storm and noticed that Lane's eye had become cloud-filled as if being punched in the eye. Nature is expected to fight Lane more and win over the next couple of days.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a close-up of Lane on Sept. 17 at 3:25 p.m. EDT when it was still a hurricane. In the image, Lane's eye appeared obscured by clouds as towering thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the center of circulation.

By Tuesday, Sept. 18 at 11 a.m. EDT, Lane weakened to a tropical storm. Lane's maximum sustained winds had fallen to 70 mph (110 kmh). It was centered about 1,170 miles (1,885 km) west of the southern tip of Baja California, near 20.1 North latitude and 127.9 West longitude. It was moving to the north near 9 mph (15 kmh) and is expected to turn to the northwest.

Those towering cloud tops surrounding Lane's entire eye had warmed on Tuesday, Sept. 18, indicating that they are not as high, and weaker.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that Lane will be punched all over, not just "in the eye." There are two factors that are giving Lane a beating on Sept. 18 and 19, and those are cooler waters and increased wind shear. Lane is moving into an area where sea surface temperatures are colder than 22 Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit), far below the 26.6C (80F) threshold needed for keeping a tropical cyclone alive. In addition, wind shear is forecast to increase from the southwest and pummel Lane at speeds of 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph), eventually "knocking it out." Lane is expected to become a remnant low pressure area by Wed., Sept. 19.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 17, 2012

MODIS image of Tropical Storm Kristy and Hurricane Lane› Larger image
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific on Sept. 16 at 2:45 p.m. EDT the satellite captured Tropical Storm Kristy (at the time a tropical storm) and Hurricane Lane, located to Kristy's southwest. Lane appeared to have a tighter circulation. Marine layer clouds were seen west of Tropical Storm Kristy in the image. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Eastern Pacific Storms Power Up and Down

While Tropical Storm Kristy faded into a remnant low pressure area, Lane strengthened into a hurricane. NASA's Terra satellite caught a look at both storms when it passed overhead on Sept. 16 and showed a much tighter circulation within Hurricane Lane than in weakening Tropical Storm Kristy.

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific on Sept. 16 at 18:45 UTC (2:45 p.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard the satellite captured Tropical Storm Kristy (at the time a tropical storm) and Hurricane Lane, located to Kristy's southwest. Lane appeared to have a tighter circulation. Marine layer clouds were seen west of Tropical Storm Kristy in the image. The image was created by the NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Kristy Becomes a Remnant Low Pressure Area

Kristy weakened to a remnant low pressure area on Monday, Sept. 17 by 11 a.m. EDT, about 645 miles (1,040 km) west-northwest of the southern tip of Baja California. It was centered near 26.2 North latitude and 119.5 west longitude and moving to the north-northwest at 6 mph (9 kmh). It is expected to turn north, northeast , then north-east northeast over the next two days. Kristy's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kmh) and weakening.

The National Hurricane Center noted that swells generated by Kristy will continue to affect portions of southern and central Baja California on Sept. 17 and will gradually subside by Tuesday, Sept. 18. These swells could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Lane Becomes a Hurricane

The twelfth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season was born on Sat. Sept 15 at 11 a.m. EDT about 1,080 miles 1,740 km west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

By Sept.17 at 11 a.m. EDT Lane had grown into a hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 75 kmh (120 kmh) and it was located about 1,160 miles (1,865 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near latitude 16.7 north and longitude 126.5 west. Lane is moving toward the north-northwest near 10 mph (17 kmh) and is expected to continue in that direction with a turn northwest on Sept. 18. The National Hurricane Center notes that some strengthening is possible over the next day.

Satellite data indicates that the sea surface temperatures in Lane's path are as cool as 24 Celsius (75.2 Fahrenheit), cooler than the 26.6C (80F) needed to maintain a tropical cyclone, so forecasters note that after a day, Lane should begin to weaken.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.