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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Kirk (Atlantic Ocean)
09.02.12
 
Sep. 2, 2012

GOES satellite image of Isaac, Kirk, Leslie, and Tropical Depression 10E › View larger image
Tropical Depression Isaac's Remnants continued soaking the Ohio Valley and are moving into the Mid-Atlantic, while Kirk became post-tropical in the northern Atlantic, Tropical Storm Leslie is strengthening and headed north. In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Depression 10E was born.On Sept. 2 at 7:45 p.m. EDT, the NASA GOES Project created this infrared image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite that showed all four storms.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
MODIS captured this visible image of Kirk on Aug. 31 when Kirk was still a hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean. › View larger image
This visible image of Kirk was captured on Aug. 31 from the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite, when Kirk was still a hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Atlantic Storms Isaac, Kirk and Leslie, and E. Pacific TD10E

On Sunday, Sept. 2, Tropical Depression Isaac's Remnants continue soaking the Ohio Valley and are moving into the Mid-Atlantic, while Kirk became post-tropical in the northern Atlantic, Tropical Storm Leslie is strengthening and headed north. In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Depression 10E was born. All of these storms were captured in one panoramic image created by NASA from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Sunday, Sept. 2, 2012

On Sept. 2 at 7:45 p.m. EDT, the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created infrared image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite that showed all four storms.

Kirk Becomes Post-Tropical

At 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 2, Kirk became Post-tropical storm Kirk Hurricane Kirk's with maximum sustained winds near 50 mph (85 kmh). Kirk was about 965 miles (1,550 km) east-northeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland near 49.7 North and 30.1 West. It was speeding to the north 47 mph (76 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 1002 millibars. That was the last position noted in the final bulletin from the National Hurricane Center. Additional information on this system can be found in high seas forecasts issued by the United Kingdom Meteorological office.


Tropical Storm Leslie Intensifying Again, Turning North

Tropical Storm Leslie weakened and is now expected to intensify as it turns north. The National Hurricane Center expects Leslie to become a hurricane before reaching Bermuda. On Sept. 2 at 5 p.m. EDT Leslie had maximum sustained winds near 60 mph (95 kmh), and was located about 370 miles (590 km) north of the Leeward Islands, near latitude 22.4 north and longitude 61.3 west. Leslie is moving northwest near 10 mph (17 kmh).

The National Hurricane Center noted that Leslie is generating rough surf that is affecting the Leeward Islands and will begin affecting Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands during the night on Sept. 2, and during Sept. 3. The GOES-13 satellite imagery indicates strong northwesterly wind shear, where clouds and showers are pushed to the southeast of the center of circulation.


Isaac's Remnants Affecting Ohio and Tennessee Valleys

Isaac is merging with a frontal zone and moving through the Ohio Valley. The remnants associated with a low pressure center were located over Illinois on Sept. 2. East of the low pressure center, the frontal boundary was draped over southern West Virginia and into North Carolina. West of the low, a frontal boundary stretched back through the Tennessee Valley. The low pressure center is expected to crawl eastward over southern Indiana on Sept. 3, and over northern Kentucky on Sept. 4, bringing showers and thunderstorms with it as it crawls east.


Eastern Pacific: Tropical Depression 10 E Forms, Ileana Fizzles

Tropical Storm Ileana fizzled early on Sunday, Sept. 2 and Tropical Depression 10E was born.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 2, Ileana had become a post-tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 30 mph (45 kmh). The last advisory from the National Hurricane Center was issued at that time, and Ileana was located near latitude 22.6 north and longitude 122.5 west. The remnant low is moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kmh). Ileana's remnants are expected to turn west-southwest on Sept. 3. Ileana appears as a large area of clouds to the northwest of Tropical Depression 10E on the GOES-13 satellite image.

Tropical Depression 10E formed 320 miles (510 km) south of the southernmost tip of Baja California at 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 3. It was centered near 18.3 North and 109.6 West. Tropical Depression 10E had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and was moving to the west-northwest at 17 mph (28 kmh). The National Hurricane Center noted that the storm could strengthen into a tropical storm on Sept. 3.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 31, 2012

This visible image of Isaac over moving over the Mississippi Valley, and Kirk and Leslie in the central Atlantic Ocean. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac over moving over the Mississippi Valley, Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Storm Leslie in the central Atlantic Ocean. The image was taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 31 at 4:45 a.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Sees Atlantic Storms Isaac, Kirk and Leslie

Tropical Depression Isaac is weakening and dropping heavy rainfall along its slow path through the center of the U.S., while Hurricane Kirk is spinning in the central Atlantic, and Tropical Storm Leslie is strengthening on a westward track toward the Caribbean. All of these storms were captured in one panoramic image created by NASA from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite.

On Aug. 31 at 4:45 a.m. EDT, a visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 showed Tropical Depression Isaac centered over Arkansas and moving into Missouri. Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Storm Leslie were moving through the central Atlantic Ocean. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.


Hurricane Kirk Staying at Sea

At 5 a.m. EDT on Aug. 31, Hurricane Kirk's maximum sustained winds were near 105 mph (165 kmh). Kirk was about 835 miles (1,345) east of Bermuda near 30.1 North and 50.9 West. It was moving to the north-northwest 12 mph (19 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 970millibars. Kirk is a Category two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.

The GOES-13 image showed that Kirk continued to be a compact hurricane, and hurricane force winds extend just 15 miles (30 km) from the center. The National Hurricane Center forecasts Kirk to move in a northeasterly direction over the next four days on an approach to Ireland. As Kirk tracks northward and runs into cooler waters, it will weaken and transition into an extra-tropical storm.


Tropical Storm Leslie Intensifying, Moving West

Tropical Depression 12 formed on Aug. 30, and quickly strengthened into Tropical Storm Leslie. The National Hurricane Center expects Leslie to become a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 1-2 and move northwest and turn north on Sunday, Sept. 2. Leslie is expected to stay to the north of the Leeward Islands and turn toward Bermuda. At this time, it is expected to pass east of Bermuda.

On Aug. 31 at 6 a.m. EDT Leslie had maximum sustained winds near 65 mph (100 kmh), and was located about 940 miles (1,510 km) east of the Leeward Islands, near latitude 15.2 north and longitude 47.8 west. Leslie is moving west-northwest near 16 mph (26 kmh). Because Leslie continues to move in a favorable environment of low wind shear and warm waters, it could become a major hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 1-2, according to the National Hurricane Center.


Tropical Depression Isaac Over Arkansas and Missouri

At 5 a.m. EDT on Aug. 31, Tropical Depression Isaac had maximum sustained winds are near 25 mph (40 kmh). Isaac is expected to weaken over the weekend of Sept. 1-2 and become a post-tropical remnant low pressure area.

Isaac's center was about 95 miles (155 km) west of Little Rock, Ark. near latitude 34.7 north and longitude 93.9 west. Isaac is moving north near 12 mph (19 km). Isaac is expected to move over Arkansas today and Missouri tonight. Rainfall totals of 3 to 6 inches with isolated maximum amounts of 8 inches possible across Arkansas and into southern Missouri through Friday, Aug. 31. Tornado watches are posted central and southern Mississippi in addition to extreme eastern Arkansas.

Isaac is expected to turn northeast and track over the mid-Mississippi Valley, and into the Ohio Valley on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 3 as it continues to crawl to the Mid-Atlantic.

Flooding has been widespread in Louisiana, as a result of the heavy rainfall. Following are rainfall totals from Hurricane Isaac, according to the National Hurricane Center:

RAINFALL TOTALS
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SELECTED STORM TOTAL RAINFALL IN INCHES THROUGH 7 PM CDT


ALABAMA
Grand Bay 0.6 Nw 11.07
Mobile/Bates Field 9.67
Wilmer 7.9 Se 8.75
Fairhope 2.3 N 6.42
Daphne 1.8 Ese 5.87
Theodore 8.0 Sse 5.12
Point Clear 1.6 Ssw 5.04
Silverhill 0.9 Sse 4.34
Foley 2.0 Ssw 3.71

ARKANSAS
Monticello Airport 2.91
Pine Bluff/Grider Field 2.63
El Dorado/Goodwin Field 1.71

FLORIDA
Vero Beach 5.2 S 16.60
Royal Palm Beach 5.0 W 16.29
Boynton Beach 1.9 Nnw 14.41
Port St Lucie 1.5 Ne 13.04
Aberdeen 4.2 Nnw 12.41
Palm City 4.0 Sw 11.69
Homestead Afb 9.37
Fort Pierce/St Lucie 9.18
West Palm Beach Intl Arpt 8.64
Vero Beach Muni Arpt 7.66
Fort Lauderdale Executive Apt 7.02
Miami/Opa Locka 6.64
Pompano Beach Airpark 5.33
Winter Haven Gilbert Arpt 5.19
Orlando/Herndon 5.12
Hollywood/North Perry Arpt 5.12

GEORGIA
Guyton 1.9 S 5.60
Brooklet 13.1 Se 4.60
Rincon 1.2 Nnw 4.03
Monroe 5.6 Nne 3.11
Augusta/Bush Field 2.53
Alma/Bacon Co. Arpt 2.49
Savannah Muni Arpt 2.47
Fort Stewart/Wright Aaf 2.06
Augusta/Daniel Field 1.95
Moody Afb/Valdosta 1.50

LOUISIANA
New Orleans 20.08
Reserve 0.5 Sse 13.46
Livingston 13.16
Hammond 2.3 Wsw 11.93
Terrytown 3.3 S 10.56
Slidell 10.40
Abita Springs 1.9 Ne 10.15
Baton Rouge/Ryan Muni Arpt 4.57
Boothville 4.20
Monroe Rgnl Arpt 2.37
Patterson Memorial Arpt 2.00
Lafayette Rgnl Arpt 1.55
Alexandria/Esler 1.50

MISSISSIPPI
Kiln 3.3 N 17.04
Marion Raws/Columbia 15.02
Saucier 1.7 Nne 12.78
Picayune 5.6 Ene 12.17
Diamondhead 1.5 Ne 12.04
Long Beach 0.7 S 11.95
Mccomb/Lewis Field 10.93
Gulfport-Biloxi 10.85
Pascagoula 10.67
Keesler Afb/Biloxi 10.17
Hattiesburg/Chain Muni Arpt 9.44
Hattiesburg/Laurel 7.93
Jackson/Hawkins Field 4.03
Meridian/Key Field 4.00
Jackson Wfo 3.93
Meridian Nas/Mccain 1.72

NORTH CAROLINA
Wilmington/New Hanover Co. Arpt 4.07
Jacksonville/Ellis Airport 1.50

SOUTH CAROLINA
Mount Pleasant 5.5 Nne 9.08
Pawleys Island 5.6 Nne 8.36
Charleston 2.8 Ne 7.36
Johns Island 9.0 Se 6.44
Meggett 1.8 W 4.85
Beaufort Mcas 3.59
Rock Hill-York Co. Arpt 2.89
Darlington 1.75

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 30, 2012

GOES visible image of Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Depression 12 in the central Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 30 › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Isaac over the U.S. Gulf coast, Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Depression 12 in the central Atlantic Ocean. The image was taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 30 at 7:45 a.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Spies Fifth Atlantic Hurricane and Twelfth Tropical Depression

Tropical Storm Kirk intensified into a hurricane today, Aug. 30, while another tropical depression was born. Satellite imagery revealed Hurricane Kirk and newborn Tropical Depression 12 romping through the central Atlantic Ocean today, while Tropical Storm Isaac continues to drench the U.S. Gulf coast and Mississippi Valley. Kirk became the Atlantic Ocean season's fifth hurricane today, Aug. 30.

On Aug. 30 at 7:45 a.m. EDT, a visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured all three tropical cyclones in a panoramic shot of the Atlantic Ocean basin. The visible image showed Tropical Storm Isaac over the U.S. Gulf coast, Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Depression 12 in the central Atlantic Ocean. Isaac was by far the largest of the three systems, with cloud cover extending from east Texas to the Carolinas. Hurricane Kirk appeared as a small, rounded , compact storm, located northwest of newborn Tropical Depression 12, which appeared larger than Kirk. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.


Hurricane Kirk

At 11 a.m. EDT on Aug. 30, Kirk became the fifth hurricane of the Atlantic Ocean season. Its maximum sustained winds were near 75 mph (120 kmh). It was far from land, however, about 1.065 miles (1.715) northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands near 27.2 North and 49.5 West. It was moving to the northwest at 12 mph (19 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 989 millibars. The GOES-13 image showed that Kirk was a compact hurricane, and hurricane-force winds only extend 10 miles (20 km) from the center, while tropical-storm-force winds extend up to 70 miles (110 km).


Tropical Depression 12 Expected to Become Tropical Storm Leslie

On Aug. 30 at 11 a.m. the warm summertime waters of the Atlantic Ocean gave birth to the twelfth tropical depression on the season. Tropical Depression 12 (TD12) had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 km/h), and is expected to become a tropical storm later on Aug. 30 and could become a hurricane over the weekend, according to the National Hurricane Center.

TD12 was also far from land areas, located about 1,185 miles (1,905 km) east of the Windward Islands, near latitude 14.1 north and longitude 43.4 west. TD12 is moving quickly to the west near 20 mph (32 kmh). TD12's estimated minimum central pressure is 1007 millibars.

Satellite data shows a well-defined curved band of thunderstorms wrapping around the western side of the circulation center.TD12 is expected to move over warm waters which will help it strengthen, and it could become Tropical Storm Leslie later on Aug. 30,or Hurricane Leslie by the weekend of Sept. 2.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 29, 2012

On Aug. 29 at 12:29 a.m. EDT the AIRS instrument on Aqua captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kirk's clouds. › View larger
On Aug. 29 at 12:29 a.m. EDT the AIRS instrument on Aqua captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kirk's clouds. Cloud top temperatures were colder (purple) than –63F (-52C) around the center of circulation and west of the center. That's where the strongest storms and heaviest rainfall were occurring. Kirk appears to resemble a comet because windshear is pushing clouds and showers to the northeast.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Kirk Looks More Like a Comet on NASA Infrared Imagery

Tropical Storm Kirk looks more like a comet than a tropical storm in infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite because of wind shear. NASA infrared imagery also revealed powerful thunderstorms around the center of circulation which are indicators that Kirk will continue strengthening. Meanwhile, another low pressure area appears to be organizing in the eastern Atlantic, far to the southeast of Kirk.

Tropical Depression Kirk formed from the eleventh tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season. Tropical Depression 11 formed on Aug. 28 at 5 p.m. EDT about 1,270 miles (2,045 km) east-northeast of the Lesser Antilles.

On Aug. 29 at 12:29 a.m. EDT the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kirk's clouds. Cloud top temperatures were colder than –63F (-52C) around the center of circulation and west of the center. That's where the strongest storms and heaviest rainfall were occurring. Early on Aug. 29, wind shear was affecting Kirk from the southwest. Those winds were pushing clouds and showers associated with Kirk to the northeast giving Kirk the appearance of a "comet tail" in infrared imagery.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Aug. 29, Kirk's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph (75 kmh) and gradual strengthening is expected. The center of Tropical Storm Kirk was about 1,135 miles (1,825) km east-northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands, near latitude 24.7 north and longitude 46.9 west. Kirk is moving toward the west-northwest near 12 mph (19 kmh), and is expected to turn northwest on Aug. 30.

Kirk is dealing with a combination of wind shear and dry air, which will make intensification a slow process. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Kirk to curve to the northeast into an area of weaker wind shear, where it is expected to intensify into a hurricane over the weekend of Sept. 1-2, remaining over open ocean. Kirk is also expected to become extra-tropical on its northeastern journey.

While Kirk continues getting organized, another low pressure area is following suit in the eastern Atlantic. There's a low pressure area riding along a tropical wave, located about 700 miles west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, that is showing an increase in shower and thunderstorm activity. The system has a 50% chance of becoming tropical depression 12 as it moves to the westward to west-northwestward at about 15 mph (24.4 kmh) over the next couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.