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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Kai-tak (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
08.20.12
 
NASA Sees Heaviest Rainfall in Typhoon Kai-Tak on Northwestern Side

Typhoon Kai-Tak was seen by the TRMM satellite on August 16, 2012 at 2106 UTC when it was approaching southern China.
› View larger image
Typhoon Kai-Tak was seen by the TRMM satellite on August 16, 2012 at 2106 UTC when it was approaching southern China. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data show that powerful storms in the northwest side of Kai-Tak's eye were dropping rain at a rate greater than 50 mm/hr (~2 inches). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) data also show that at that time Kai-Tak had a large area of heavy rainfall located east of Hainan. Kai-Tak made landfall in southern China’s Guangdong province with sustained wind speeds of about 64kts (~75mph). Kai-Tak made landfall on in mainland China on August 17 and brought heavy rainfall and gusty winds to some cities in Guangxi and southern Guangxi, according to Xinhuanet news. Previous and forecast positions of Kai-Tak are shown overlaid in white. Credit: SSAI/NASA Hal Pierce

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 17, 2012

MODIS captured this image of Kai-tak's center crossing Leizhou, China on August 17, 2012 at 0340 UTC. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Kai-tak's center crossing Leizhou, China on August 17, 2012 at 0340 UTC.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS captured this infrared image Typhoon Kai-tak on Aug. 16 at 1811 UTC › View larger image
The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image Typhoon Kai-tak on Aug. 16 at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT), and showed the strongest thunderstorms (purple) remained south of the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellites See Tropical Storm Kai-tak Affecting China, Vietnam

Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared images of Tropical Storm Kai-tak as it approaches the Vietnam/China border for a landfall.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image Kai-tak when it was a Typhoon on Aug. 16 at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT), and showed the strongest thunderstorms still remained south of the center of circulation. Strong thunderstorms at that time were affecting Hainan Island, China, northern and central Vietnam.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Kai-tak on August 17, 2012 at 0340 UTC and captured a visible image of the storm using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. At that time its center was crossing Leizhou, China.

On August 17 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Tropical Storm Kai-tak was located near 21.7 North and 107.1 East. It was about 120 nautical miles east-northeast of Hanoi, Vietnam, has been moving west at 17 knots (19.5 mph/31/4 kmh). Maximum sustained winds were near 60 knots (69 mph/111 kmh).

Kai-tak crossed Leizhou and is expected to make landfall near the border of northern Vietnam and China. After landfall, forecasters expect it to dissipate quickly.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.














Aug. 16, 2012

On August 16, 2012 MODIS at 3:00 UTC captured this visible image of Typhoon Kai-tak approaching China. › View larger image
On August 16, 2012 at 03:00 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Kai-tak approaching China. The cities are labeled in yellow, and countries are labeled in white.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS showed the strongest bands of thunderstorms (purple) to south of Kai-tak's center of circulation. › View larger image
The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image Typhoon Kai-tak on Aug. 16 at 05:59 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT), and showed the strongest bands of thunderstorms (purple) to south of the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Terra and Aqua Satellites See Typhoon Kai-tak's Large Reach

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed over Typhoon Kai-tak on August 16, 2012, and captured visible and infrared imagery that shows the storm's extent.

On August 16, 2012 at 03:00 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Kai-tak approaching China. The image showed Kai-tak taking up a large part of the South China Sea, stretching from the Philippines in to the east to mainland China, including Hainan Island, China. The high-resolution imagery showed an area of very high, strong thunderstorms just off-shore from the city of Zhanjiang, China and skirting the northeastern part of Hainan Island. Most of Kai-tak's clouds had moved east of Luzon, Philippines by that time as the typhoon continues heading west-northwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center, the organization that forecasts tropical cyclones in that area of the world, noted that infrared satellite imagery indicates that "deep convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the typhoon) has decreased in areal extent (during the morning hours (UTC) on August 16) with slight weakening in deep convective banding [of thunderstorms around the center of circulation]."

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image Typhoon Kai-tak on Aug. 16 at 05:59 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT) that showed the strongest bands of thunderstorms were located south of the center of circulation.

Kai-tak's maximum sustained winds are near 65 knots (75 mph/120.4 kmh) making it a minimal typhoon. Tropical-storm-force winds extend out 90 miles (145 km) from the center of circulation. Kai-tak's center is about 155 nautical miles (178 miles/287 km) south of Hong Kong, near 19.9 North and 113.7 East longitude. Kai-tak is moving to the west-northwest at 14 knots (16 mph/26 kmh).

Kai-tak is now expected to track to the west-northwest and not make landfall near Hong Kong. Despite the change in Kai-tak's course, Hong Kong has posted strong wind signal 3.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center now expect Kai-tak to come ashore east of the Leizhou Peninsula on Friday, August 17. Meanwhile, all residents along southeastern China's coastal areas can gusty winds, rough surf and heavy rainfall as Kai-tak continues moving through the South China Sea.

For the highest resolution image of Typhoon Kai-tak from NASA's Terra satellite, go to: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Kai-tak.A2012229.0300.2km.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 15, 2012

AIRS captured infrared data on Kai-tak when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0517 UTC. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Kai-tak when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT/1:17 p.m. local time, Hong Kong). The purple areas indicate the coldest, strongest thunderstorms and are areas where heavy rain is likely falling.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Large Tropical Storm Kai-tak Headed for a Landfall Near Hong Kong

Warnings are still in effect in the northern Philippines and now in Hong Kong, as Tropical Storm Kai-tak continues to drop heavy rainfall and move toward a landfall in China. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data that shows a large area of strong thunderstorms that make up Kai-tak.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Kai-tak when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT/1:17 p.m. local time, Hong Kong). Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that infrared satellite imagery shows the organization near the center of Kai-tak's tightly wrapped low-level-circulation center suffered some minor degradation during the early part of August 15. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides infrared data and showed a large area of cold cloud top temperatures (a sign of more uplift and strength in the storm) west of Kai-tak's center. The strongest thunderstorms and coldest cloud top temperatures stretched from northern Luzon, west into the South China Sea. Satellite data shows a lack of convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm) around the northern periphery of the storm.

The winds of Tropical storm Kai-tak, known in the Philippines as Helen, have increased to 55 knots (63 mph/102 kmh) on August 15. Kai-tak is located near 19.5 North latitude and 119.0 East longitude, about 320 nautical miles (368 miles/592.6 km) east-southeast of Hong Kong. Kai-tak is moving to the west-northwest near 17 knots (19.5 mph/31.5 kmh).

Kai-tak continues moving northwest and is passing over northern Luzon today, August 15, 2012. Warnings are still in effect in Luzon, the Philippines and now in effect in Hong Kong, China.

Current warnings in effect in the Philippines on August 15 include: Public storm warning signal #1 for the Luzon provinces of Benguet, Ifugao, Isabela, La Union, Northern Aurora, Mountain Province, Nueva Vizcaya, Quirino, and Pangasinan. In addition, Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect for these Luzon provinces: Apayao and Abra, the Batanes Group of Islands, Cagayan, Calayan, Babuyan Group of Islands, Kalinga and Ilocos North and South.

In Hong Kong, the Stand-by signal 1 is in force. After passing over the South China Sea, it will come ashore near Hong Kong at typhoon strength. Landfall is expected to occur near Hong Kong tomorrow, Thursday, August 16 near 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT/8 p.m. local time, Hong Kong). Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center note that warm waters off-shore may cause Kai-tak to intensify to typhoon strength just before it makes landfall.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 14, 2012

TRMM 3-D image to show the vertical scale of the numerous powerful storms near Kai-tak's center › View larger image
TRMM flew over Kai-tak on August 13, 2012 at 4:16 p.m. EDT and TRMM's Precipitation Radar data were used in a 3-D image to show the vertical scale of the numerous powerful storms near Kai-tak's center. Some convective storms were reaching heights of about 15km (~9.3 miles).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce TRMM revealed that the most intense rainfall of over 100mm/hr. (~3.9 inches) was over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite flew over Kai-tak on August 13, 2012 at 4:16 p.m. EDT and showed that the tropical storm was dropping extreme amounts of rainfall. TRMM revealed that the most intense rainfall of over 100mm/hr. (~3.9 inches) was east of the Philippines over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. Some light to moderate rainfall from Kai-tak was shown falling on the island of Luzon.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees More Rain for the Philippines from Tropical Storm Kai-Tak

An intensifying Tropical storm called Kai-Tak (locally known as Helen) is causing more rain in the Philippines as it passes over northern Luzon. The Philippines have had a very wet month with the capital of Manila experiencing massive flooding earlier this month. NASA's TRMM satellite identified where the heavy rain was falling.

Kai-tak has caused another day of warnings in the Philippines. On August 14, Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for these provinces in Luzon: La Union, Nueva Ecija, Pangasinan, Rest of Aurora, and Tarlac.

In addition, Public storm warning signal #2 has been posted for these Luzon provinces: the Abra and Batanes Group of Islands, Apayao, Benguet; Cagayan (including Calayan and Babuyan Group of Island), Ifugao, Ilocos South and North, Isabela, Kalinga, Mt. Province, Northern Aurora, Nueva Vizcaya, and Quirino.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over Kai-tak on August 13, 2012 at 2216 UTC 4:16 p.m. EDT). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data showed that the tropical storm was dropping extreme amounts of rainfall. TRMM PR revealed that the most intense rainfall of over 100mm/hr. (~3.9 inches) was east of the Philippines over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. Some light to moderate rainfall from Kai-tak was shown falling on the island of Luzon.

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used in a 3-D image to show the vertical scale of the numerous powerful storms near Kai-tak's center. Some convective storms were reaching heights of about 15km (~9.3 miles).

Tropical storm Kai-tak had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kmh). It was located about 220 nautical miles (253 miles/407 km) northeast of Manila, Philippines, near 17.4 North latitude and 123.1 East longitude. Kai-tak was moving to the southwest at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kmh) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest.

Satellite data from August 14 has shown that Kai-tak's low-level center has become more organized. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed cooler cloud top temperatures (a sign of more uplift and strength in the storm).

Kai-tak is taking a track across northern Luzon and is expected to move south of Taiwan before making landfall in China.

Text Credit: Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 13, 2012

MODIS captured an image of Tropical Storm Kai-tak, located just off the east coast of the Philippines on August 13 at 0230 UTC › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Kai-tak, located just off the east coast of the Philippines on August 13 at 0230 UTC (Aug. 12 at 10:30 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Kai-tak Brushing the Philippines

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Kai-tak affecting the northern Philippines on August 13 as the storm heads toward China for a final landfall. Warnings are already in effect in part of the Philippines. Tropical storm Kai-tak is the fourteenth tropical cyclone of the western North Pacific season. On August 13 at 11 a.m. EDT, Kai-tak had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kmh). It was located approximately 290 nautical miles (334 miles/ 537 km) east-Northeast of Manila, Philippines, has tracked west-southwestward at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kmh). The storm is called "Helen" in the Philippines, and its close proximity has caused the issuance of warnings.

Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for the Luzon provinces: Apayao, Cagayan, Babuyan, Quirino, Aurora, Isabela, Kalinga, and the Batanes and Calayan group of islands. Public Signal #1 means winds between 28-37 mph (45-60 kmh) can be expected.

Public Storm Signal 2 is in effect for Isabela and Cagayan, where winds between 37-62 mph (61-100 kmh) can be expected. The Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Adminstration, known as PAGASA, caution residents living in low lying and mountainous areas that flash flooding and mudslides are possible from the heavy rainfall. In addition, residents living along the coasts are being cautioned against large waves or storm surges.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Kai-tak, located just off the east coast of the Philippines on August 13 at 0230 UTC (Aug. 12 at 10:30 p.m. EDT). Satellite imagery showed that the convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm) have strengthened around the center of the storm. The MODIS image was created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. by the MODIS Rapid Response Team.

Kai-tak is moving along the southern edge of a subtropical ridge, which is an elongated area of high pressure. Kai-tak will move northwestward and slowly intensify, passing through the Luzon Strait, while its center stays at sea, north of Luzon, the Philippines.Kai-tak is expected to make landfall north of Hong Kong on August 16. Although forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Kai-tak to strengthen, it is expected to weaken before making landfall because of cooling ocean heat content and wind shear.

For a high-resolution image of Kai-tak from NASA's Terra satellite, go to: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Kai-tak.A2012226.0230.2km.jpg

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.