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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Joyce (Atlantic Ocean)
08.24.12
 
wide-frame image of the Atlantic with tropical storm formations measured from Cuba to Africa. This visible image was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 24 at 7:45 a.m. EDT. and shows Tropical Storm Isaac (left) in the eastern Caribbean Sea, Tropical Depression Joyce (center) in the central Atlantic Ocean and System 97L (far right) near the African coast. Credit: NASA GOES Project
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NASA Sees Joyce "Depressed" in the Central Atlantic

Tropical Storm Joyce weakened into a tropical depression late on Aug. 23 in degenerated further into a remnant low pressure area today, Aug. 24.

Joyce appeared less organized on NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery on Aug. 24. When NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Joyce at 7:45 a.m. EDT it appeared to have lost its well-rounded circulation as wind shear had taken a toll on the storm. The GOES-13 image was created using the NOAA satellite data at NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Hours later, Joyce degenerated into a remnant low pressure area.

On Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. EDT, Post-Tropical cyclone Joyce had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh). Joyce was located far from land, about 1,030 miles (1,655 km) east of the Leeward Islands near 17.8 North latitude and 46.2 West longitude. It was moving to the northwest near 16 mph (226 kmh). The National Hurricane Center issued its final advisory on Joyce today, Aug. 24 at 11 a.m. when it became a remnant low pressure area.

Joyce's remnants are being battered by wind shear and dry Saharan air, something that usually saps a tropical cyclone's energy. Joyce is still following the southern edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure over the Central Atlantic Ocean. Some of the hurricane computer models indicate that Joyce may weaken into an elongated area of low pressure over the weekend of Aug. 25-26 and dissipate.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 23, 2012

NASA Sees Newborn Tropical Storm Joyce in the Central Atlantic

Tropical Storm Joyce seen by GOES› Larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Joyce was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 23 at 7:45 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA GOES Project
Tropical Depression 10 appeared more organized on NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery early on Aug. 23 (Eastern Daylight Time) and it was renamed Tropical Storm Joyce by the National Hurricane Center by 11 a.m. EDT

When NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression 10 (TD10) on Aug. 23 at 7:45 a.m. EDT it appeared to have a well-rounded circulation. Infrared imagery indicated cold cloud top temperatures. Cold cloud top temperatures as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) show strength in the uplift of air that helps create strong thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone. The GOES-13 image was created using the NOAA satellite data at NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

On Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Joyce had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kmh). Joyce was located far from land, about 1,305 miles (2,105 km) east of the Leeward Islands near 15.2 North latitude and 42.2 West longitude. It was moving to the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kmh).

Satellite data indicates that Joyce is dealing with a dry Saharan air layer, something that usually saps a tropical cyclone's warm, moist air. That dry air is wrapping around the southwestern part of Joyce's circulation.

The Saharan Air Layer is one thing that NASA is going to investigate in its upcoming Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinels (HS3) mission in September, using unmanned aircraft. For more information, go to: http://www.nasa.gov/HS3.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Joyce is following the southern edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure over the Central Atlantic Ocean. Think of a marble rolling around the edge of a round clock. Once Joyce (the marble in this example) reaches the western edge, it will begin to turn to the northwest and then to the north.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 22, 2012

NASA Sees Tropical Storm Isaac and Tropical Depression 10 Racing in Atlantic

Isaac and TD10

This visible image captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 22 at 1445 UTC shows Tropical Storm Isaac over the Lesser Antilles, and newborn Tropical Depression 10 trailing behind in the central Atlantic. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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TD10

The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of the western half of Tropical Depression 10 on Aug. 22 at 12:23 a.m. EDT, hours before it was named a depression. Scattered strong thunderstorms (purple) appeared in the western and northern quadrants of the storm. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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There are now two active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and NASA is generating satellite imagery to monitor their march westward. Tropical Storm Issac is already bringing rainfall to the Lesser Antilles today, Aug. 22, Tropical Depression 10 formed in the eastern Atlantic, and another low fizzled in the western Gulf of Mexico.

Tropical Storm Isaac formed late on Aug. 21 from Tropical Depression 9 and immediately caused warnings and watches. Tropical Depression 10 formed during the morning hours on Aug. 22 in the central Atlantic, east of Isaac and appears to be following the tropical storm on NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Isaac over the Lesser Antilles, and newborn Tropical Depression 10 trailing behind on Aug. 22 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT). The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Both storms are showing good circulation.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Isaac on Aug. 22 at 2:05 a.m. EDT, as it was bringing heavy rainfall to the Lesser Antilles. Strong thunderstorms appeared in a band of thunderstorms in Isaac's western quadrant that had cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F (-52C).

Watches and Warnings in Effect

The National Hurricane Center has posted Warnings and Watches for Tropical Storm Issac. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe and the surrounding islands, and St. Martin, St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, and Anguilla, Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Maarten, British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

There are also hurricane and tropical storm watches in effect. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, and the U.S. and British Virgin Islands; the south coast of the Dominican Republic from Isla Saona westward to the Haiti-Domenican Republic southern border. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the north coast of the Dominican Republic from the Haiti-Dominican Republic northern border eastward to north of Isla Saona.

The tenth tropical depression seemed to take a cue from Issac, because soon after tropical depression 9 strengthened into Isaac, Tropical Depression 10 (TD10) was born.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the western half of Tropical Depression 10 on Aug. 22 at 12:23 a.m. EDT, hours before it was named a depression. Scattered strong thunderstorms appeared in the western and northern quadrants of the storm, indicating strong uplift in the storm, that would later lead to its consolidation and strengthening into a depression.

TD10 came into being on Aug. 22 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. It was located about 860 miles (1,385 km) west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near 12.4 North latitude and 36.3 West longitude. TD10 is moving toward the west-northwest near 16 mph (26 kmh) and this general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days. TD10 has maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh), and the National Hurricane Center expects TD10 to become a tropical storm Joyce.

System 95L Fizzles Out

The third low pressure area that forecasters had been watching for possible development has fizzled out, now that it moved inland in northeastern Mexico. The NHC gives it a "near zero percent" chance of development now.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.