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Super Typhoon Jelawat (Pacific Ocean)
10.01.12
 
AIRS infrared image of Jelawat making landfall on the big island of Japan near Hamamatsu on Sept. 29, 11:53 p.m EDT. › View larger image
This infrared image was created from AIRS data on Sept. 30 at 0353 UTC (11:53 p.m. EDT, Sept. 29) as Jelawat was making landfall on the big island of Japan near Hamamatsu. Strongest thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) appear in purple.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
AIRS infrared image from Sept. 30 at at 11:53 a.m. EDT after Jelawat had made landfall on the big island of Japan › View larger image
This infrared image was created from AIRS data on Sept. 30 at 1553 UTC (11:53 a.m. EDT) after Jelawat had made landfall on the big island of Japan and had moved to the northeastern region. Strongest thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) appear in purple.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Former Super Typhoon Jelawat Make Landfall in Japan

Former super typhoon Jelawat made landfall in Japan over the weekend of Sept. 29 and 30, bringing heavy rainfall and typhoon-strength wind gusts. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image that showed the strongest thunderstorms over northern Japan on Sept. 30.

Before making its final landfall, Jelawat's center passed east of Ishigakijima, where sustained winds of 75 mph (120.7 kph) were reported. A wind gust of 106 mph (170.6 kph) was also reported there, while nearby Takashiki Island reported a wind gust to 132 mph (212.4 kph)!

In Okinawa, Kadena Air Force Base reported a gust of 115 mph (185 kph) and sustained winds of 83 mph (133.6 kph). Kadena has been affected by several typhoons this season. Jelawat caused downed trees and power outages.

On Sept. 30, 2012, at 5 p.m. EDT (or Oct. 1 at 5 a.m. local time/Japan) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final warning on then Tropical Storm Jelawat. At that time, Jelawat was located near 38.6 north latitude and 140.9 East longitude, about 70 miles (112.7 km) west of Yokosuka, Japan and moving quickly to the north-northeast at 39 knots (44.8 mph/72.2 kph). It had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph).

Jelawat made landfall as a tropical storm near Hamamatsu which is located about 120 miles (193 km) west of Tokyo.

At Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured two images of Jelawat on the day of landfall on the big island of Japan. The first infrared image was taken on Sept. 30 at 0353 UTC (11:53 p.m. EDT, Sept. 29) as Jelawat was making landfall on the big island of Japan near Hamamatsu. The infrared image did show some stongt thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) appear in purple. The second infrared image was taken on Sept. 30 at 1553 UTC (11:53 a.m. EDT) after Jelawat had made landfall and had moved to the northeastern region.

According to the Weather Channel at weather.com, a wind gust of 75 miles (120.7 kph) per hour was recorded at Tokyo's Haneda International Airport from Jelawat on Sunday evening local time/Japan.

Jelawat's transformation to an extra-tropical storm completed after it passed over Honshu. The typhoon history book is now closed on the once mighty super typhoon Jelawat while the cleanup continues throughout Japan.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 28, 2012

MODIS passed over Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 28 and captured this image as the storm approaches Okinawa, Japan. › View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 28 at 0238UTC (10:38 p.m. EDT, Sept. 27) and captured this true-color image as the storm approaches Okinawa, Japan.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Super Typhoon Jelawat Affecting Japan

Super Typhoon Jelawat is a large and powerful storm that has been bringing very rough seas to areas in the western North Pacific. NASA's Terra satellite passed over the monster storm and captured a visible image as it nears the big island of Japan.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 28 at 0238UTC (10:38 p.m. EDT, Sept. 27) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer captured an infrared image as the storm approaches Okinawa, Japan.

Jelawat's center passed by Ishigaki-jima by 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 28 and was approaching Okinawa, the island that houses Kadena Air Base. Ishigaki is a Japanese island, located west of Okinawa and is the second-largest in islands known as Yaeyama Island group.

On Sept. 28 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Jelawat had maximum sustained winds near 110 knots (126.6 mph/203.7 kmh). That makes Jelawat a category three typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Jelawat was located near 24.6 North latitude and 125.6 East longitude, about 190 nautical miles (218.6 miles/352 km) southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. It is moving to the northeast at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kmh) and generating very rough seas, with waves as high as 40 feet (12.1 meters).

The center of Jelawat is expected to pass near or over Okinawa. The Facebook page for Kadena Air Base noted that the base is at warning level TCCOR-1 which means "Destructive sustained winds of 50 knots or greater are expected within 12 hours (or within four hours as of 2 p.m. EDT on Sept. 28)."

By Sept. 30, Jelawat is expected to be tracking off-shore from Japan's big island as it continues moving to the northeast in open waters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 27, 2012

AIRS data of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 27 as the storm moves away from the northern Philippines. › View larger image
This infrared image was created from AIRS data of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 27 at 0459 UTC as the storm moves away from the northern Philippines. A thick area of strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures appear in purple surrounding at 36 nautical-mile wide eye.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Sees a Wide-Eyed Super Typhoon Jelawat

One day ago, Super Typhoon Jelawat's eye was about 25 nautical miles in diameter, today, Sept. 27, NASA satellite data indicated that eye has grown to 36 nautical miles!

The latest infrared image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite shows a clear eye in Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25. The cloud top temperatures of the thunderstorms surrounding the eye exceed -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) indicating that they are very powerful and heavy rainmakers.. Jelawat also has a rounded shape indicating that circulation is strong and symmetrical

On Sept. 25, Super Typhoon Jelawat's maximum sustained winds were near 95 knots (109 mph/176 kmh). It was located about 390 nautical miles (449 miles/722 km) south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, near 21.4 North and 124.0 East. Jelawat was moving north-northwest at 9 knots(10.3 mph/16.6 kmh) and generating extreme seas with wave heights to 48 feet (14.6 meters).

Like Ewiniar, Jelawat is also expected to affect Kadena Air Base and its center is forecast to move very close to the island. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted "Regardless of the exact track near Okinawa, Jelawat is a 300 nautical mile wide system with a large eye and eyewall and will maintain 100 plus knot winds (115 mph/185 kmh) through (48 hours from Sept. 27 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC) due to continued favorable environmental conditions."

Jelawat is then expected to continue north-northeast and make landfall just south of Kyoto, Japan on Sept. 30.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 26, 2012

TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates from Jelawat and Ewiniar on Sept. 24, 2012 at 12:10 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates from Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewiniar on Sept. 24, 2012 at 1610 UTC (12:10 p.m. EDT). TRMM data showed that heaviest rainfall (purple) falling at a rate of around 80 mm/3.1 inches per hour around the tight eye of Typhoon Jelawat, while Ewiniar had small areas of moderate to heavy rainfall northeast of the center of circulation. Heavy rainfall appears in red, falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Light to moderate rainfall is depicted in blue and green (falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
This TRMM animation shows Super Typhoon Jelawat's rainfall and cloud heights on September 24, 2012 › View TRMM Animation
This animation shows Super Typhoon Jelawat's rainfall and cloud heights on September 24, 2012 at 1611 UTC (12:11 p.m.) when it was close to a category five typhoon.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
AIRS captured this infrared image of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25 at 1:23 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25 at 1:23 p.m. EDT. The clear 28 mile wide eye is seen surrounded by strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (purple) exceeding -63F/-52C.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Very Heavy Rain in Super Typhoon Jelawat and Heavy Rain Pushed from Ewinar's Center

NASA's TRMM satellite measured the rainfall of Super Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewiniar as they continue moving through the western North Pacific Ocean. Super Typhoon Jelawat had super rainfall rates around its eye, while nearby Tropical Storm Ewinar's heaviest rainfall was pushed north and west of its center because of wind shear.

Jelawat was intensifying and close to a category five super typhoon when NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed above on September 24, 2012 at 1611 UTC (12:11 p.m.). A 3-D image was created using TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument that showed hot towering thunderstorms around the tight center of circulation.

TRMM data showed that heaviest rainfall in Super Typhoon Jelawat was falling at a rate of around 3.1 inches (80 mm) per hour around the storm's tight eye. The eyewall replacement was completed today, Sept. 26, and Jelawat's clear eye is now 25 nautical miles (28.7 miles/46.3 km) wide, 8 nautical miles (9.2 miles/14.8 km) wider than it was on Sept. 25.

On Wednesday, Sept. 26, Jelawat was located 495 nautical miles (569 miles/917 km) south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, and has tracked northwestward at 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.3 kmh). Jelawat is forecast to continue tracking northwest and then make a turn to the northeast on Sept. 28 when it runs into an elongated area of low pressure moving east from the Yellow Sea. That turn puts Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan near the center of the forecast track from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25 at 1:23 p.m. EDT. The clear 28 mile wide eye is seen surrounded by strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-52C.

East of Jelawat, Tropical Storm Ewiniar is spinning in the western North Pacific Ocean. On Sept. 24, the TRMM satellite noticed that Tropical Storm Ewiniar had small areas of moderate to heavy rainfall northeast of the center of circulation. That rainfall was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. Rainfall had become weaker during the early part of Sept. 26 as wind shear continues to batter the storm from the southwest. On Sept. 26, Ewiniar's maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (52 mph/83.3 kmh). Ewiniar was located 485 nautical miles (558 miles/898 km) south-southeast of Yokosuka, Japan, has tracked north-northeastward at 13 knots (15 mph/24 kmh). Ewiniar is forecast to turn more northward over the next day, and then turn to the northeast.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



















Sept. 25, 2012

This combined image was created from infrared AIRS data of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25 and Tropical Storm Ewiniar on Sept. 24 to give perspective of their distance from each other. › View larger image
This combined image was created from infrared AIRS data of Super Typhoon Jelawat on Sept. 25 and Tropical Storm Ewiniar on Sept. 24 to give perspective of their distance from each other. The eye of Jelawat is clearly visible in the middle of powerful thunderstorms (purple) with very cold cloud top temperatures.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Data Compares Super Typhoon Jelawat with Tropical Storm Ewiniar

NASA's Aqua satellite has been obtaining infrared, visible and other data every time it passes over Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewiniar in the western North Pacific, and a combination of two images from Aqua's AIRS satellite puts the storms in perspective.

A combined image created from infrared data obtained by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite provides a comparison of the two monster storms in the western North Pacific Ocean basin. An infrared image of Typhoon Jelawat captured on Sept. 25 was combined with an image of Tropical Storm Ewiniar, that was taken on Sept. 24. The combined image gives perspective of the distance of the tropical cyclones from each other. The image showed the close proximity of the storms. Earlier in the week, Jelawat's outflow was affecting Ewiniar and preventing it from strengthening more quickly.

The data also showed a visible eye in the center of super typhoon Jelawat in the middle of powerful thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures that exceed -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Jelawat also has a rounded shape indicating that circulation is strong and symmetrical. Tropical Storm Ewiniar, however, appears somewhat asymmetrical, in the form of an elongated comma shape. The comma's "tail" is a large band of strong thunderstorms wrapping into Ewiniar's center from the southeast.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a natural-color image on September 24, 2012, showing Jelawat just east of the Philippines. Sporting a distinct eye and spiral arms characteristic of strong storms, Jelawat spanned hundreds of kilometers (miles). As of September 24, 2012, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) classified Jelawat as a super typhoon. For the MODIS image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Jelawat.A2012268.0430.2km.jpg.

Jelawat remains a super typhoon today, Sept. 25, with maximum sustained winds near 140 knots (161 mph/259 kmh). It is located 385 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines, and is moving north-northwestward at 6 knots (7 mph/11 kmh). Satellite imagery is showing tightly wrapped bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the eye of the storm. The eye is about 17 nautical miles wide. High pressure in the upper atmosphere and low wind shear are helping the super typhoon maintain its intensity. The JTWC projected storm track showed the storm moving toward the north-northwest over the next several days, passing near the island of Taiwan before turning toward the northeast.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 24, 2012

This infrared image was taken on Sept. 24 and revealed that Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewinar had large areas of strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall around the center of circulation.
› View larger image
This infrared image was taken on Sept. 24 and revealed that Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewinar had large areas of strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall around the center of circulation. The above infrared images of Tropical Storm Jelawat (top) and Tropical Storm Ewiniar (bottom) were captured by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The images were taken on Sept. 24 and revealed that Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewiniar had large areas of strong thunderstorms (purple) and heavy rainfall around the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Frigid Cloudtop Temperatures Indicate Strength in Super Typhoon Jelawat and Tropical Storm Ewiniar

Tropical Storm Jelawat had been moving toward the Philippines since the week of Sept. 17 and on Sept. 24 it became a super typhoon east of the country. Meanwhile, the nineteenth tropical depression formed just east of Jelawat in the western North Pacific Ocean and quickly strengthened into a tropical storm. Both storms were captured on one infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a large area of powerful thunderstorms around the center of Typhoon Jelawat and a band of thunderstorms west of the center on Sept. 23. Those thunderstorms continued to strengthen on Sept. 24 and cloud top temperatures exceeded -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Cloud top temperatures are an indication of uplift in a storm. Uplift is the push of air upward that allows formation of towering clouds and thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone.

Jelawat's center continues to stay east of the Philippines, but is causing rough surf (with wave heights up to 37 feet/11.2 meters) along the eastern coasts of the country and its large extent is bringing rains and gusty winds as well.

Jelawat is a powerful Super Typhoon with a clear 23 nautical mile-wide eye and maximum sustained winds near 130 knots (149.6 mph/240.8 kmh).Jelawat is a Category 4 typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale. It is located near 15.0 North latitude and 127.9 East longitude, approximately 410 nautical miles (472 miles/759 km) east of Manila, Philippines. Jelawat's minimum central pressure is near 926 millibars. Jelawat is forecast to track to the northwest through the Philippine Sea and move toward Taiwan.

Tropical Storm Ewiniar had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/64.8 kmh) on Sept 24 at 1500 UTC (11:00 a.m. EDT). It was centered near 20.9 North and 138.9 East, a 300 nautical miles (345 miles/555.6 km) south-southwest of Iwo To. AIRS data showed that the low-level center is slowly consolidating (organizing) and becoming less elongated. The strongest convection and thunderstorms were seen in a band of thunderstorms east of the center of circulation. Ewiniar is getting organized slowly because of westerly wind shear caused by nearby Typhoon Jelawat.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Ewiniar to track to the north-northeast and affect Iwo Two tomorrow, Sept. 25 as it continues in a northeasterly direction.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Sept. 21, 2012

Jelawat › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this true-color image of Tropical Storm Jelawat on Sept. 20, 2012 at 01:50 UTC, before it had strengthened into a tropical storm. The Philippines is visible in the lower left corner.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Jelawat Form in Northwestern Pacific

As another tropical storm was forming in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Terra satellite was providing forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with visible and other data on the storm.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression 18W before it strengthened into Tropical Storm Jelawat late in the day on Sept. 20, in the Philippine Sea (part of the western North Pacific Ocean basin).

On Sept. 20 at 01:50 UTC, as the depression was strengthening into a tropical storm, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a true-color image of the storm. The MODIS image showed a rounded shape, which indicates good circulation. There was also a band of thunderstorms east of the center of circulation.

On Sept. 21, Tropical Storm Jelawat had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). Jelawat was located about 535 nautical miles east-southeast of Manila, Philippines, near 12.4 north latitude and 129.7 east longitude. It was moving to the west-southwest at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph).

Forecasters used infrared satellite imagery, such as that from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite to determine the initial position of the tropical storm. Infrared data from Sept. 21, 2012, showed that the strongest convection and coldest cloud top temperatures were in the northwestern and southeastern quadrants of the tropical storm. Those areas were experiencing the heaviest rainfall.

By 10 p.m. local time in Manila, Philippines (10 a.m. Eastern Time/U.S.) on Sept. 21, Jelawat's center was about 311 miles (500 km) east of Catarman capital of Northern Samar, near 12.4 north latitude and 129.7 east longitude. Northern Samar is a Philippine province in the Eastern Visayas region.

The Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration issued a bulletin about Jelawat (known locally as Lawin) on Sept. 21 that noted "Estimated rainfall amount is from 10 to 25 mm (0.4 to 0.9 inches) per hour within the 600 km (373 miles) diameter of the Tropical Storm. Fishing boats and other small seacrafts are advised not to venture out into the eastern seaboard of Southern Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao due to big waves generated by Tropical Storm (Jelawat) Lawin."

Jelawat is expected to track slowly west-northwestward over the weekend of Sept. 22 and 23 while the storm intensifies. The forecast track from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center keeps the center of Jelawat at sea, while almost tracking parallel to the Philippines.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.