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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Hector (East Pacific Ocean)
08.17.12
 
On August 17, 2012, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured visible images of Tropical Depression Hector's remnants at 10:45 a.m. EDT. › View larger image
On August 17, 2012, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured visible images of Tropical Depression Hector's remnants at 10:45 a.m. EDT. Weak showers remain and are southwest of the center (where the brightest white clouds appear).
Credit: NASA GOES Project
GOES-15 Satellite Sees Hector Weaken to a Remnant Low

The punch has gone out of Tropical Depression Hector, and the National Hurricane Center classified it as remnant low pressure area on the morning of August 17.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured visible image of post-Tropical Depression Hector at 10:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 17. Weak showers were located southwest of the center of circulation where the brightest white clouds appeared in the image. NASA's GOES Project created the image. NASA GOES Project is located at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on August 17, 2012, Hector's maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph (45 kmh). Hector's center was located about 440 miles (710 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near latitude 20.8 North and longitude 116.4 West. Hector is moving toward the north-northwest near 7 mph (11 kmh) and is expected to turn toward the north in the next day.

The remnant low pressure area should gradually weaken and dissipate over the next day or two.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 16, 2012

AIRS captured this infrared image Tropical Depression Hector on Aug. 16 at 09:59 UTC (5:59 a.m. EDT) › View larger image
The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image Tropical Depression Hector on Aug. 16 at 09:59 UTC (5:59 a.m. EDT), and showed the strongest thunderstorms (purple) remain southwest of the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared View of Tropical Depression Hector Shows Waning Strength

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed by Tropical Depression Hector on August 16, there was one area of strength remaining in the cyclone.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image Tropical Depression Hector on Aug. 16 at 09:59 UTC (5:59 a.m. EDT). The AIRS infrared image showed the strongest thunderstorms remain southwest of the center of circulation.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Hector had become a tropical depression as maximum sustained winds dropped to 30 mph (45 kmh). Hector's center was about 445 miles (715 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near latitude 19.7 north and longitude 115.9 west. The depression is moving toward the north-northwest near 5 mph (7 kmh).

The National Hurricane Center expects Hector to degenerate into a remnant low pressure area by Friday, August 16 because it is now in cooler waters, and an area of moderate wind shear.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 15, 2012

This GOES-13 image from August 15, 2012 shows Tropical Storm Hector and the remnants of Tropical Depression 7. › view larger image
This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image from August 15, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. EDT shows Tropical Storm Hector fading in the eastern Pacific, and the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 crossing over Central America.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
GOES-15 Satellite Sees Fading Tropical Storm Hector and TD7's Remnants

Two tropical cyclones were spotted from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite today, August 15. Tropical Storm Hector continues to weaken in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, while the remnants of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 7 are moving over Central America. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., uses the GOES-15 satellite data to create images and animations from the satellite. The NOAA GOES-15 satellite sits in a fixed orbit over the eastern U.S. and provides infrared and visible imagery of the Eastern Pacific Ocean basin continuously. In a visible image on August 15, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. EDT, the small circulation remaining from Tropical Storm Hector is spinning of the western coast of Mexico, while the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 were seen crossing over Central America.


Tropical Storm Hector

On August 15, 2012 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Tropical Storm Hector had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kmh). It was weakening as a result of atmospheric conditions and its movement into cooler waters. The National Hurricane Center noted "Hector will continue to be affected by 15-20 knots of east-southeasterly shear during the next couple of days," which are weakening the cyclone.

The center of Hector was located near latitude 17.2 north and longitude 115.2 west, about 525 miles (840 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center noted that Hector has been lingering in the same area during the early morning hours of August 15, but is expected to move north-northwestward at about 5 mph (7 kmh) later today. Hector could become a tropical depression tonight or on Thursday, August 16.


Tropical Depression 7's Remnants

The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 (TD7) are now located over western Honduras and the coast of Belize. TD7 is still producing showers and thunderstorms, although they are disorganized. The showers and thunderstorms extend over the far northwestern Caribbean Sea to parts of Central America and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. That means locally heavy rains in those areas through Thursday, August 16 as TD7 moves to the west-northwest between 15 and 20 mph. The National Hurricane Center gives the TD7's remnants a "near zero percent" chance of becoming a tropical depression again in the next 48 hours as it continues to move across Central America. Once it gets into the Eastern Pacific Ocean, if it makes it there, may be a different story.

As Hector fades, forecasters will be keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 to see what develops.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 14, 2012

TRMM data showed that Hector had a small area of moderate to heavy rainfall around the center of circulation. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates from Tropical Storm Hector on August 14, 2012 1:28 a.m. EDT. TRMM data showed that Hector had a small area of moderate to heavy rainfall around the center of circulation. Heavy rainfall appears in red, falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Light to moderate rainfall is depicted in blue and green (falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees a Small Area of Heavy Rain Left in Tropical Storm Hector

Tropical Storm Hector is battling wind shear over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and NASA satellite data shows that has been affecting its organization and rainfall rates.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM is managed by both NASA and the Japanese Space Agency. From its orbit in space, TRMM's instruments can estimate rainfall from tropical cyclones.

The TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates from Tropical Storm Hector on August 14, 2012 1:28 a.m. EDT. TRMM data showed that Hector had a small area of moderate to heavy rainfall around the center of circulation. That small area of heavy rainfall was falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour. For the most part, rainfall was light-to-moderate in other areas of Hector.

Hector is being battered by moderate winds from the east, and that has been pushing the rainfall to the west of the storm's center. That wind shear is expected to be around for the next couple of days, which will prevent Hector from strengthening.

On Tuesday, August 14 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Hector's maximum sustained winds remained near 45 mph (75 kmh). The center of Tropical Storm Hector was about 230 miles (365 km) west-southwest of Socorro Island and about 440 miles (710 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. That puts Hector's center near latitude 18.1 north and longitude 114.4 west. Hector is moving toward the west near 6 mph (9 kmh).

Hector is moving west and is expected to turn northwest before weakening into a remnant low pressure area by the end of the week.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 13, 2012

On August 13, 2012 GOES saw the remnants of Tropical Depression 7, System 93L, and Tropical Storm Hector › View larger image
This image of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Pacific Ocean was created by NASA's GOES Project using NOAA GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite imagery on August 13, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT. The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 in the Caribbean Sea, and the low pressure area called System 93L in the eastern Atlantic. In the eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Hector looks disorganized and System 95E is near the Mexican coast.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
A Quieter Atlantic to Start the Week; Hector in E. Pacific

On August 13, the Atlantic tropics are quieter than they were the previous week, when four low pressure areas were marching across the ocean basin. Satellite imagery shows two lows in the Atlantic as Tropical Storm Hector spins in the Eastern Pacific Ocean with System 95E near the Mexican coast.

The NOAA GOES-13 satellite sits in a fixed orbit over the eastern U.S. and provides infrared and visible imagery of the Atlantic Ocean basin continuously. At the same time, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite covers the western U.S. and eastern Pacific Ocean. At NASA's GOES Project, the data from the satellites were combined to create a "full-disk view" of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's GOES Project is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., and creates images and animations from the two GOES satellites.

A visible and infrared image of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Pacific Ocean were combined to give a complete picture of the tropics on both sides of the continental U.S. on August 13, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT.


Tropical Depression 7 and System 93L

The GOES-13 part of the image, which is in visible light, shows two areas of disturbances in the tropics. The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 in the Caribbean Sea, and the low pressure area called System 93L in the eastern Atlantic.

Tropical Depression 7 (TD7) weakened to a remnant low pressure area on Saturday, August 11 at 11 a.m. EDT. It brought squalls of wind and rain to the Lesser Antilles over the weekend. On Monday, August 13, the remnants were moving over the central Caribbean Sea and are producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms extending from the central Caribbean northward to Hispaniola. The National Hurricane Center noted that "environmental conditions are not expected to be conducive for regeneration, and this system has a low chance, 10 percent, of becoming a tropical cyclone again during the next 48 hours as it moves westward near 20 mph." In the GOES-13 imagery from August 13, TD7's remnants appear elongated, which is likely from wind shear.

The low pressure area called System 93L ran into adverse atmospheric conditions over the weekend of August 11-12, 2012, but conditions are expected to improve over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that "Shower activity remains limited in association with a broad area of low pressure located about 1,200 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands." The NHC gives System 93L just a ten percent chance of organizing over the next two days into a tropical depression. Meanwhile, System 93L continues to move west-northwestward at around 20 mph.


Eastern Pacific's Tropical Storm Hector and System 95E

The Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Ernesto changed names. Ernesto crossed Mexico from the Gulf of Mexico to the eastern Pacific as a remnant low pressure system. On Saturday, August 11 at 1 p.m. EDT, the low re-strengthened into tropical depression 8E. At that time, Tropical Depression 8E was located about 150 miles (245 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, near 17.5 North and 106.0 West. Twelve hours later at 11 p.m. EDT, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Hector becoming the eighth tropical storm of the season.

By 5 a.m. EDT on August 13, Hector's maximum sustained winds decreased to near 40 mph (65 kmh). Hector was located near latitude 18.1 north and longitude 111.4 west, about 55 miles (90 km) west of Sorocco Island. Hector is moving west at 7 mph (11 kmh) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest and slow over the next couple of days. Wind shear appears to be taking its toll on Hector as it appears somewhat elongated in the GOES-15 satellite image from August 13. Wind shear is expected to remain strong over the next couple of days, which should keep Hector from strengthening and may weaken it to a remnant low pressure area.

A weak area of low pressure called System 95E is located about 175 miles southeast of Acapulco, Mexico continues to produce showers and thunderstorms. System 95E appears to have a tight circulation on the GOES-15 satellite imagery on August 13. The NHC gives System 95E a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next couple of days, while it moves to the west-northwest at 10 mph.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 12, 2012

The TRMM satellite passed above Ernesto on Thursday August 9, 2012 at 1506 UTC (11:06 AM EDT). › View larger image
The TRMM satellite passed above on Thursday August 9, 2012 at 1506 UTC (11:06 AM EDT). Ernesto contained bands of moderate to heavy rainfall that were affecting areas of Mexico from the southern Gulf Of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean coast. The heaviest rainfall of over 60mm/hr (~2.3 inches) was measured by TRMM PR in Gulf of Tehauntepec off Mexico's Pacific Coast.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
This image of Hector used data collected by TRMM on Saturday August 11, 2012 at 1451 UTC › View larger image
This image of Hector used data collected by TRMM on Saturday August 11, 2012 at 1451 UTC (10:51 AM EDT) before the tropical depression was upgraded to tropical storm Hector.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Ernesto Die, Hector Forms From the Remnants

Tropical storm Ernesto had moved inland over Mexico when the TRMM satellite passed above on Thursday August 9, 2012 at 1506 UTC (11:06 AM EDT). The image of Ernesto shows an analysis of rainfall from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments. This analysis shows that Ernesto contained bands of moderate to heavy rainfall that were affecting areas of Mexico from the southern Gulf Of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean coast. The heaviest rainfall of over 60mm/hr (~2.3 inches) was measured by TRMM PR in Gulf of Tehauntepec off Mexico's Pacific Coast. Ernesto weakened to a tropical depression on Friday August 10, 2012 after being battered by Mexico's mountainous terrain. Flooding and seven deaths in Mexico were attributed to Ernesto.

Ernesto's remnants moved into the Pacific Ocean and were upgraded by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) to tropical depression number eight (TD08) on Saturday August 11, 2012. The image of Hector used data collected by TRMM on Saturday August 11, 2012 at 1451 UTC (10:51 AM EDT) before the tropical depression was upgraded to tropical storm Hector.

Tropical storm Hector is predicted by the NHC to weaken while moving harmlessly northwestward over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Text Credit: Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.