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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Gordon (Atlantic Ocean)
08.21.12
 
GOES image of TD9› Larger image
This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image taken on Aug. 21 at 7:45 a.m. EDT shows three of the four tropical systems being watched in the Atlantic Ocean basin. From left to right are: System 95L, Tropical Depression 9 and System 96L. Post-tropical Storm Gordon is just beyond the horizon. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NASA Sees an Active Tropical Atlantic Again

The Atlantic Ocean is kicking into high gear with low pressure areas that have a chance at becoming tropical depressions, storms and hurricanes. Satellite imagery from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites have provided visible, infrared and microwave data on four low pressure areas. In addition, NASA's GOES Project has been producing imagery of all systems using NOAA's GOES-13 satellite to see post-Tropical Storm Gordon, Tropical Depression 9, and Systems 95L and 96L.

Tropical Storm Gordon is no longer a tropical storm and is fizzling out east of the Azores. Tropical Depression 9 was born on Aug. 20 and continues to get organized. Behind Tropical Depression 9 in the eastern Atlantic is another low pressure area called System 96L. In the Gulf of Mexico lies another low, called System 95L. In an image taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Aug. 21 at 7:45 a.m. EDT, all of the systems were visible except for post-tropical Storm Gordon. The storms are seen lined up along the Atlantic basin from left to right with System 95L in the Gulf of Mexico, Tropical Depression 9 just east of the Caribbean Sea and System 96L in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

NOAA manages the GOES-13 satellite, and NASA's GOES Project uses the data to create images and animations out of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Tropical Depression 9

On Aug. 20 at 0435 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) before System 94L organized into Tropical Storm 9, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead, and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. It showed that the strongest convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) were located south of the center of circulation. Those thunderstorms had cold cloud top temperatures of -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) that indicated there was strong uplift in the low pressure area, and were an indication that the system could strengthen, which it did later into a depression.

Tropical Depression 9 has been the cause for tropical storm warning posts in a number of islands. On Aug. 21, a Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Dominica, Guadeloupe, Desirade, Les Saintes, Marie Galante, and St. Martin.

TD9 appears as a rounded storm on the GOES-13 satellite image from Aug. 21. In the image, low pressure area "System 96L" trails to the southwest of TD9.

On Aug. 21 at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) Tropical Depression 9 (TD9) had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm later today. It was located about 645 miles (1,035 km) east of Guadeloupe near latitude 15.1 north and longitude 51.8 west. TD90 is moving toward the west near 20 mph (32 kmh) and is expected to continue moving in that direction for the next couple of days, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

NHC said that the cyclone should move through the central Lesser Antilles on Wed., Aug. 22 and move into the Caribbean Sea the next day. NHC expects rainfall between 4 and 8 inches to affect the northern Windward and the Leeward Islands, accompanied by heavy surf and rip tides.

System 96L in Eastern Atlantic

System 96L appears well-defined on the GOES-13 satellite imagery. It is associated with a tropical wave, and is spinning about 425 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. The NHC said that System 96L could very well become the tenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Hurricane Season in the next day or two. It is moving to the west at 15 mph.

System 95L Struggles in the Gulf of Mexico

The eastern-most low pressure area in the Atlantic Ocean basin is System 95L, located in the western Gulf of Mexico. It is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms just off-shore of the northeastern coast of Mexico. The low-level center of circulation is also elongated, which is a bad sign for a tropical cyclone trying to organize. Tropical cyclones need a strong, rounded circulation to strengthen. The NHC noted that slow development is still possible before System 95L moves inland in northeastern Mexico later in the day on Wed. Aug 21. The system has a 30 percent chance of developing before that happens. Once inland, its chances for development are greatly reduced because it will be cut off from its life-giving warm water supply.

Tropical Storm Gordon is History

On Monday, August 20, satellite imagery and surface data revealed that Tropical Storm Gordon lost his tropical characteristics, making it a post-tropical cyclone. According to Reuters news, Gordon caused some power outages, fallen trees and minor flooding.

The National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on Gordon on August 20 at 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC). At that time, Gordon still had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kmh) and was weakening. Gordon was about 370 miles (595 km) east-northeast of the Azores, near latitude 39.2 north and longitude 20.3 west. Gordon was moving east-northeast near 16 mph (26 kmh) and was expected to turn southeast while weakening further. Gordon is expected to dissipate in a couple of days east of Portugal.

To see an image of Tropical Storm Gordon captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite on Aug. 20 at 8:20 a.m. EDT, before it transitioned into a post-tropical storm, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Gordon.A2012233.1220.2km.jpg

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



MODIS shows the progression of Hurricane Gordon through the eastern Atlantic Ocean.› View larger image
These three images from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites were captured on August 17, 18 and 19 and show the progression of Hurricane Gordon through the eastern Atlantic Ocean.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Satellites Capture 3 Days of Hurricane Gordon's Atlantic Track

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite have captured Hurricane Gordon over three days as it neared the Azores Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Gordon weakened to a tropical storm on August 20.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, is an instrument that flies onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites and provides high-resolution imagery to users. When NASA's Terra satellite flew over Gordon on August 17 at 9:30 a.m. EDT it was a tropical storm and did not have a visible eye. It was followed up by a fly over of NASA's Aqua satellite on August 18 at 11:50 a.m. EDT, it had strengthened into a hurricane and had a clear and visible eye. On August 19, Gordon was still a hurricane at 10:55 a.m. EDT when NASA's Aqua satellite again passed over the storm. At that time, Gordon was affecting the Azores Islands. Ocean swells in the eastern Azores generated by Gordon are expected to start subsiding today, August 20, as Gordon moves east and toward Portugal.

At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) on August 20, Gordon weakened back to tropical storm status with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kmh). The center of Tropical Storm Gordon was located about 115 miles (180 km) east-northeast of Santa Maria Island in the Azores, near latitude 37.7 north and longitude 23.2 west. The National Hurricane Center noted that Gordon is moving toward the east-northeast near 15 mph (24 kmh) and is expected to slow and turn east.

The National Hurricane Center expects Tropical Storm Gordon to become extra-tropical later in the day on August 20. For the high resolution images from MODIS on August 17, 18 and 19, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Gordon.A2012230.1330.1km.jpg; http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Gordon.A2012231.1550.1km.jpg; and http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Gordon.A2012232.1455.1km.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





In this animation of satellite observations from August 17-20, 2012, Tropical Storm Gordon strengthens into a hurricane as an eye became visible on Aug. 18 just before Gordon affected the Azores Islands. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. Super(s): Courtesy: NASA/NOAA GOES Project Center Contact: Rob Gutro (443) 858-1779



Aug. 17, 2012

Image of Tropical Storm Gordon› View larger image
Terra passed over Gordon on August 16, 2012 at 10:25 a.m. EDT (1425 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm. The image showed that the bulk of Gordon's clouds were pushed to the north and northeast as a result of southwesterly wind shear.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Wind Shear Affecting Tropical Storm Gordon

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gordon as it continues to spin up in the North central Atlantic Ocean, and revealed the storm has become less symmetric, indicating it is being battered by wind shear.

When Terra passed over Gordon on August 16, 2012 at 10:25 a.m. EDT (1425 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm. The image showed that the bulk of Gordon's clouds were pushed to the north and northeast as a result of southwesterly wind shear. The MODIS image showed what appeared to be a higher, rounded area of thunderstorms surrounding the center, where the most powerful storms were located. Outer bands of thunderstorms wrapping from the north to the east also contained higher, strong thunderstorms. The wind shear continued on August 17 and Gordon's clouds became less symmetric.

On Friday, August 17, at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) Gordon's maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph (100 kmh) with higher gusts. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Gordon could still become a hurricane briefly over the weekend of August 18-19. Gordon is a small storm with tropical storm-force winds extending 60 miles (95 km) from the center, and mostly to the north-northeast.

Gordon was centered about 1,195 miles (1925 km) west of the Azores near latitude 34.6 north and longitude 48.1 west. Gordon is moving toward the east near 18 mph (30 kmh) and it is expected to continue in that general direction. A large trough (elongated area) of low pressure over the northeastern Atlantic Ocean will steer Gordon a little to the south and east for the next couple of days.

Although Gordon is expected to move over somewhat cooler waters, computer models used by the National Hurricane Center still indicate that Gordon may become a hurricane, if just for a short time over the next couple of days and then transition into an extra-tropical storm before reaching the Azores. The NHC noted that Gordon should be approaching the Azores late Sunday, August 19.

Meanwhile, in the far eastern Atlantic, the low pressure area dubbed System 94L has now developed. It is located near 11.3 North latitude and 17.9 West longitude, just west of the African coast. System 94L is producing an area of disorganized showers and thunderstorms. The NHC gives System 94L a 10 percent chance of developing into a tropical depression over the weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





An animation of satellite observations from August 14-17, 2012 shows the birth and strengthening of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Gordon making a U-turn and heading back to the east. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. Super(s): Courtesy: NASA/NOAA GOES Project Center Contact: Rob Gutro (443) 858-1779



Aug. 16, 2012

The GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of newborn Tropical Storm Gordon on August 16 at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT).› View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of newborn Tropical Storm Gordon on August 16 at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA GOES Project
On August 15, AIRS captured this infrared image of System 93L before it became Tropical Storm Gordon.› View larger image
The AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image System 93L was strengthening into tropical depression 8, and before it became Tropical Storm Gordon. The image was taken on Aug. 15 at 12:53 p.m. EDT, and shows strong bands of thunderstorms (purple) to the north and west of the center of circulation, indicating strengthening.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA sees System 93L Explode into Tropical Storm Gordon

NASA has been watching the low pressure system called System 93L for the last week, and late on August 15 it organized into Tropical Depression 8, then Tropical Storm Gordon. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of tiny Tropical Storm Gordon after sunrise on August 16.

System 93L started out on August 10 as a tropical wave and associated low pressure area, that moved off the African coast into the eastern Atlantic. Over the last six days it moved west across the Atlantic Ocean and had its ups and downs in terms of organization and development. On August 15 at 5 p.m. EDT, it strengthened into the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression, just 15 hours after infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite identified a strong banding of thunderstorms around the center of circulation and northwest of the center. That banding was an indication of organization and strengthening.

Aqua's AIRS instrument captured another infrared image System 93L as it was strengthening into tropical depression 8, and before it became Tropical Storm Gordon. The image was taken on Aug. 15 at 12:53 p.m. EDT, and showed strong bands of thunderstorms to the north and west of the center of circulation where cloud tops were so high into the atmosphere that they were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). When thunderstorms that make up tropical cyclones reach such heights, they likely contain heavy rainfall, and are indicative of a lot of strength within the cyclone.

Tropical Depression 8 continued to intensify and by August 16, it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Gordon, the seventh tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season.

At 5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Gordon had maximum sustained wind near 40 mph (65 kmh), and some strengthening is expected, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). In fact, the NHC noted that Gordon could become a hurricane over the weekend of August 18-19 because the storm is expected to track over warm water and encounter very little wind shear.

The center of Tropical Storm Gordon was located about 585 miles (940 km) east of Bermuda, near latitude 32.2 north and longitude 54.8 west. Gordon is moving toward the north-northeast near 14 mph (22 kmh) and is expected to turn northeast and east, heading back into the north central Atlantic Ocean.

The NOAA GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of newborn Tropical Storm Gordon on August 16 at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT). The image shows that Gordon is a small storm. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward from the center to only 25 miles (35 km) and those are mostly east of the center of circulation. The GOES-13 image shows that small central dense overcast has formed near Gordon's center. The image was created at NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NASA's GOES Project creates images and animations from NOAA GOES satellite data.

The NHC expects Gordon to track east into the Atlantic, and it may affect the Azores.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Gordon



An animation of satellite observations from August 13-16, 2012 shows the birth of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression that strengthens into Tropical Storm Gordon. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. TRT 0:36 Super(s): Courtesy: NASA/NOAA GOES Project Center Contact: Rob Gutro (443) 858-1779



This image taken on August 16, 2012 shows NASA's TRMM satellite coverage of developing Tropical Storm Gordon
› View larger image
Tropical storm Gordon formed in an area of low pressure over the open waters of the central Atlantic Ocean early this morning, August 16, 2012. This image shows NASA's TRMM satellite coverage of the developing tropical storm. Rainfall data were analyzed from two TRMM orbits that passed above on August 16, 2012 at 0530 UTC and 0708 UTC. This analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar data clearly shows that rainfall in the vicinity was mainly light to moderate with maximum intensity being about 30 mm/hr (~1.2 inches).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce



Aug. 15, 2012

AIRS captured infrared data on System 93L when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0553 UTC› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on System 93L when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0553 UTC (1:53 a.m. EDT. The purple areas indicate the coldest, strongest thunderstorms and are areas where heavy rain is likely falling. It appears that there was a band of strong thunderstorms northwest of the center.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Satellite Imagery Shows Strong Bands of Thunderstorms in Developing Tropical Low

The low pressure area called System 93L has been tracked by NASA satellites over the course of a week since it moved off the west coast of Africa. Today, infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a strong sign of strength and organization, indicating that it could become a tropical depression later today.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on System 93L when it passed overhead on August 15 at 0553 UTC (1:53 a.m. EDT. The coldest, strongest thunderstorms and were seen in a band around the center of circulation and in an outer band of strong thunderstorms northwest of the center, indicating a sign or organization within the system.

System 93L is now a well-defined low pressure system. It is located about 630 miles east-southeast of Bermuda, in the Central Atlantic Ocean. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that System 93L is showing signs of organization in its shower and thunderstorm activity. System 93L is moving to the north-northwest, but is expected to turn northward and then to the northeast.

If System 93L does become a tropical depression, it would be the eighth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season. If it strengthens further, unlike its predecessor, tropical depression 7, the eighth tropical depression would be named Tropical Storm Gordon. The NHC gives it a 90 percent chance of intensifying into a tropical depression over the next day.

Tropical Depression 7 formed in the Atlantic Ocean during the week of August 6, moved into the Caribbean Sea, and made landfall in Central America today.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 14, 2012

This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image from August 14, 2012 shows Tropical Depression 7 and System 93L.› View larger image This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image from August 14, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT shows the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 in the western Caribbean Sea, and the low pressure area called System 93L in the central Atlantic.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Sees 2 Atlantic Lows Struggling: TD7, System 93L

The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 are now affecting Central America and still appear unorganized on satellite imagery. Meanwhile, the low pressure area called System 93L in the central Atlantic appears more organized. NASA created an image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite that showed both systems.

The NOAA GOES-13 satellite sits in a fixed orbit over the eastern U.S. and provides infrared and visible imagery of the Atlantic Ocean basin continuously. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., uses the data to create images and animations from the satellite. In a visible image on August 14, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT, the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 were seen in the west-central Caribbean Sea, and clouds associated with the low pressure area called System 93L were in the mid-Atlantic.


Remnants of Tropical Depression 7

The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 (TD7) are now moving over the west-central Caribbean Sea and are producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that environmental conditions are now conducive for regeneration but it is expected to move across Central America later today, August 14, which will drop its chances for regeneration. That means that portions of Central America will experience gusty winds and heavy rain as TD7's remnants move through at up to 20 mph in a westward motion. The NHC gives the remnants a 20 percent chance of re-attaining depression status over the next two days. In the GOES-13 imagery from August 14, TD7's remnants appear disorganized off the coasts of Honduras and Nicaragua.


System 93L Appears a Little Better Organized

The low pressure area called System 93L has become somewhat better organized over the last day. System 93L is located about 1,050 miles southeast of Bermuda, and has a concentrated area of showers and thunderstorms that appears circular on the GOES-13 satellite image. The NHC gives System 93L a 30 percent chance of organizing over the next two days into a tropical depression. Meanwhile, System 93L continues to move west-northwestward at around 15 mph. Environmental conditions are expected to improve over the next couple of days, so forecasters at the NHC are keeping an eye on this low pressure area.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 13, 2012

On August 13, 2012 GOES saw the remnants of Tropical Depression 7, System 93L, and Tropical Storm Hector› View larger image
This image of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Pacific Ocean was created by NASA's GOES Project using NOAA GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite imagery on August 13, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT. The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 in the Caribbean Sea, and the low pressure area called System 93L in the eastern Atlantic. In the eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Hector looks disorganized and System 95E is near the Mexican coast.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
A Quieter Atlantic to Start the Week; Hector in E. Pacific

On August 13, the Atlantic tropics are quieter than they were the previous week, when four low pressure areas were marching across the ocean basin. Satellite imagery shows two lows in the Atlantic as Tropical Storm Hector spins in the Eastern Pacific Ocean with System 95E near the Mexican coast.

The NOAA GOES-13 satellite sits in a fixed orbit over the eastern U.S. and provides infrared and visible imagery of the Atlantic Ocean basin continuously. At the same time, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite covers the western U.S. and eastern Pacific Ocean. At NASA's GOES Project, the data from the satellites were combined to create a "full-disk view" of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's GOES Project is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., and creates images and animations from the two GOES satellites.

A visible and infrared image of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Pacific Ocean were combined to give a complete picture of the tropics on both sides of the continental U.S. on August 13, 2012 at 7:45 a.m. EDT.


Tropical Depression 7 and System 93L

The GOES-13 part of the image, which is in visible light, shows two areas of disturbances in the tropics. The remnants of Tropical Depression 7 in the Caribbean Sea, and the low pressure area called System 93L in the eastern Atlantic.

Tropical Depression 7 (TD7) weakened to a remnant low pressure area on Saturday, August 11 at 11 a.m. EDT. It brought squalls of wind and rain to the Lesser Antilles over the weekend. On Monday, August 13, the remnants were moving over the central Caribbean Sea and are producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms extending from the central Caribbean northward to Hispaniola. The National Hurricane Center noted that "environmental conditions are not expected to be conducive for regeneration, and this system has a low chance, 10 percent, of becoming a tropical cyclone again during the next 48 hours as it moves westward near 20 mph." In the GOES-13 imagery from August 13, TD7's remnants appear elongated, which is likely from wind shear.

The low pressure area called System 93L ran into adverse atmospheric conditions over the weekend of August 11-12, 2012, but conditions are expected to improve over the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that "Shower activity remains limited in association with a broad area of low pressure located about 1,200 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands." The NHC gives System 93L just a ten percent chance of organizing over the next two days into a tropical depression. Meanwhile, System 93L continues to move west-northwestward at around 20 mph.


Eastern Pacific's Tropical Storm Hector and System 95E

The Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Ernesto changed names. Ernesto crossed Mexico from the Gulf of Mexico to the eastern Pacific as a remnant low pressure system. On Saturday, August 11 at 1 p.m. EDT, the low re-strengthened into tropical depression 8E. At that time, Tropical Depression 8E was located about 150 miles (245 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, near 17.5 North and 106.0 West. Twelve hours later at 11 p.m. EDT, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Hector becoming the eighth tropical storm of the season.

By 5 a.m. EDT on August 13, Hector's maximum sustained winds decreased to near 40 mph (65 kmh). Hector was located near latitude 18.1 north and longitude 111.4 west, about 55 miles (90 km) west of Sorocco Island. Hector is moving west at 7 mph (11 kmh) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest and slow over the next couple of days. Wind shear appears to be taking its toll on Hector as it appears somewhat elongated in the GOES-15 satellite image from August 13. Wind shear is expected to remain strong over the next couple of days, which should keep Hector from strengthening and may weaken it to a remnant low pressure area.

A weak area of low pressure called System 95E is located about 175 miles southeast of Acapulco, Mexico continues to produce showers and thunderstorms. System 95E appears to have a tight circulation on the GOES-15 satellite imagery on August 13. The NHC gives System 95E a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next couple of days, while it moves to the west-northwest at 10 mph.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Aug. 10, 2012

GOES-13 captured an image of four tropical systems marching across the Atlantic Ocean basic on August 10, 2012.› View larger image
NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of four tropical systems marching across the Atlantic Ocean basin on August 10, 2012. From left to right (west to east) is Ernesto over Mexico, the remnants of Florence north of Puerto Rico, Tropical Depression 7 west of the Windward Islands, and System 93L near the Cape Verde Islands and Africa.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Sees Tropical Cyclones March Across Atlantic: Ernesto, Florence, TD7, System 93L

Four tropical systems are marching across the Atlantic Ocean basin on August 10, 2012. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. has been busy creating images and animations of the four tropical cyclones, Ernesto, the remnants of Florence, Tropical Depression 7, and System 93L.

NASA's GOES Project uses data from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), and the GOES-13 satellite covers the Atlantic Ocean basin and the eastern U.S. from a fixed orbit. GOES-13 provides continuous data that NASA makes into images and animations. An image captured on August 10, 2012 at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) shows the four tropical cyclones marching across the Atlantic Ocean basin.


Tropical Depression Ernesto Dropping Heavy Rainfall Over Mexico's Mountains

At 10 a.m. EDT on August 10, the National Hurricane Center noted that Ernesto's center was near 18.0 North and 99.2 West. That places Ernesto's center about 215 miles (345 km) west-southwest of Veracruz, Mexico. Ernesto is now a remnant low pressure area and continues to weaken over the mountains of Mexico as it moves toward the eastern Pacific Ocean. As Ernesto continues on its westward track at 15 mph (24 kmh), it is generating heavy rainfall. Ernesto's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kmh) and weakening.

The GOES-13 satellite image reveals the clouds associated with Ernesto over south-central Mexico, and just to the west of Ernesto lies another low pressure area off the coast in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

The National Hurricane Center expects heavy rainfall over the next day or two over the Mexican states of Tabasco, Veracruz, Puebla, Oaxaca and Guerrero, which could cause life threatening flash floods and mudslides. Ernesto's remnant circulation could regenerate in the Eastern Pacific Ocean after the weekend.

Ernesto's remnants are expected to move into the Eastern Pacific and possibly become a tropical cyclone again. If that happened it will acquire a new depression number or a new name if it becomes a tropical storm.


The Remnants of Florence Linger Near Puerto Rico

The remnants of Tropical Storm Florence is located several hundred miles north of Puerto Rico, near 23 North latitude and 67 West longitude. The remnants are generating showers and thunderstorms. Those showers and thunderstorms appear as a small, disorganized area of clouds on the GOES-13 satellite image.

The NHC gives this a near zero chance of redevelopment as it moves to the northwest. Radar in Puerto Rico during the morning of August 10 detected a line of showers associated with the remnants of tropical storm Florence just east of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.


Tropical Depression 7 Trying to Slowly Organize

Tropical Depression 7 is struggling to organize on August 10, but conditions may improve over the weekend of August 11-12.

Satellite data on August 10 shows a well-defined circulation with a small band of thunderstorms and convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) to the northeast of the center, but the circulation of the depression is not apparent on the GOES-13 imagery.

Currently dry air surrounding the storm seems to be inhibiting further development. Further development may also be prevented because of increasing southerly to southwesterly shear over the next couple of days.

At 5 a.m. EDT Tropical Depression 7's (TD7) maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kmh). The center of TD7 was located near latitude 13.6 north and longitude 49.5 west, about 775 miles (1,245 km) east of the Windward Islands. TD7 is moving toward the west near 23 mph (37 kmh).

The National Hurricane Center expects TD7 to intensify and organize into a tropical storm while moving into an area of light wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. It is then forecast to move across the Windward Islands over the weekend on its way into the Caribbean Sea. The National Hurricane Center noted "Interests in the windward and leeward islands should monitor the progress of the depression since tropical storm watches or warnings could be required at any time."


System 93L Organizing in Far Eastern Atlantic

The fourth area for possible development in the Atlantic is a tropical wave and associated low pressure area, called "System 93L" that has just moved off the African coast into the eastern Atlantic. It's located between the Cape Verde Islands and Africa and is generating a small area of showers and thunderstorms and appears as a rounded area on the GOES-13 satellite imagery.

It is moving to the west-northwest near 20 mph, and may bring strong, gusty winds to the Cape Verde Islands over the next day or two. Because environmental conditions are favorable for development: low wind shear and warm waters over 80 Fahrenheit (26.6 Celsius), the National Hurricane Center gives System 93L a 50 percent chance of organizing into a tropical depression over the weekend of August 11-12, 2012.

Over the weekend of August 11 and 12, forecasters will have a lot to keep track of with the fading Ernesto and Florence and the developing Tropical Depression 7 and System 93L.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.