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Tropical Storm Gaemi (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
10.05.12
 
satellite image of Gaemi

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi as it was approaching Vietnam (left) on Oct. 5, 2012 at 0550 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT). The bulk of showers and thunderstorms are clearly to the southwest of the center. (Credit: NASA/Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team)
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NASA Sees Very Strong Wind Shear Battering Tropical Storm Gaemi

It is easy to see the effect of the strong northeasterly wind shear battering Tropical Storm Gaemi in satellite imagery from NASA. Visible imagery on Oct. 5 shows a large oval-shaped area of showers and thunderstorms associated with the storm, southwest of the exposed center of circulation.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi as it was approaching Vietnam on Oct. 5, 2012 at 0550 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT). A true-color image of the storm was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument and shows bulk of showers and thunderstorms were clearly to the southwest of the center. The circulation center appears as a ring of concentric bands of clouds northeast of the large rounded area of clouds and showers associated with the storm.

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Gaemi still had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph) as it did 24 hours before. It was located 425 nautical miles (489 miles/787 km)east of Hue, Vietnam near 14.7 North latitude and 117.7 East longitude. Gaemi has picked up speed and is moving to the west now at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

Gaemi is forecast to make landfall south of Hue, Vietnam sometime on Oct. 6 after 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Gaemi to dissipate two days after landfall.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 4, 2012

TRMM image of Gaemi› Larger image
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 3 at 1241 UTC (8:41 a.m. EDT), light rainfall (blue) was occurring over most of the storm. Moderate rain (green and orange) was falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour and surrounded a small area of heavy rainfall (red) circling tightly around the center. The heaviest rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Gaemi's Heaviest Rainfall Around Center

Some of the most powerful thunderstorms in a tropical cyclone surround the center of circulation, and NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that rainfall is heaviest in that area of Tropical Storm Gaemi.

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 3 at 1241 UTC (8:41 a.m. EDT), the precipitation radar instrument detected light rainfall occurring over most of the storm. Moderate rain was falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour and surrounded a small area of heavy rainfall circling tightly around the around the center. The heaviest rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

Satellite imagery on Oct. 4 shows that wind shear is taking a toll on the storm, pushing the bulk of the showers to the west, by strong easterly winds. The center of circulation also appears to be fully exposed to outside winds, which leaves the storm wide open for additional weakening influences.

On Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical storm Gaemi had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). It was located 605 nautical miles (696 miles/1,120 km) east of Hue, Vietnam near 14.7 North latitude and 117.7 East longitude. Gaemi was moving to the west at 2 knots (2.3 mph/3.7 kph).

Gaemi is expected to start moving around an area of high pressure nearby strengthens, which would push the storm west toward Vietnam. Gaemi is forecast to make landfall south of Hue, Vietnam sometime on Oct. 6. As the storm nears coastal conditions will deteriorate.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



a tropical storm swirls over the dark blue ocean off the coast of Southeast Asia in this visible color image NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 3 at 0300 UTC (11:00 p.m. EDT, Oct. 2) and the MODIS instrument captured this true-color image. Strong thunderstorms surrounded the center, as is apparent in the circle in the middle of the storm, as well as in a wide band that stretches from north to west, and southwest of the center. Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
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NASA Identifies Where Tropical Storm Gaemi's Power Lies

Tropical Storm Gaemi is packing a lot of power around its middle and on one side of the storm, and that was apparent in NASA satellite imagery.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 3 at 0300 UTC (11:00 p.m. EDT, Oct. 2) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a true-color image of the storm. The image showed a bright white, rounded area around the center that indicated higher, stronger thunderstorms. Higher, stronger thunderstorms also wrapped around the center in a wide band that stretches from north to west, and southwest of the center.

On Oct. 3, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Gaemi had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). Gaemi's center was located about 575 nautical miles (661.7 miles/1,065 km) east of Hue, Vietnam, near 15.3 North latitude and 117.5 East longitude. Gaemi is moving to the west-southwest at 4knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph).

Gaemi is now turning west and is forecast to head for a landfall on Oct. 6 on the Vietnamese coastline, south of Hue.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 2, 2012

Tropical Storm Gaemi› Larger image
Infrared imagery from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 2 at 0517 UTC. The purple areas indicate the most powerful thunderstorms with coldest cloud top temperatures. The asterisk (*) indicates the center.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Strong Thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Gaemi

Infrared NASA satellite imagery revealed that the strongest thunderstorms within Tropical Storm Gaemi in the western North Pacific Ocean were located around the storm's center and in a band of thunderstorms east of the center.

On Oct. 2, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Gaemi had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was located about 515 nautical miles (592 miles/954 km) east of Hue, Vietnam, near 15.3 North latitude and 116.7 East longitude. Gaemi is moving to the southeast at 9 knots (10 mph/16.6 kph).

Infrared imagery from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Gaemi on Oct. 2 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT). The most powerful thunderstorms with coldest cloud top temperatures were near -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) around the center and in a band of thunderstorms east of the center of circulation.

Satellite imagery shows that Gaemi is slightly elongated which is a sign of disorganization. However, Gaemi is expected to become more circular over the next couple of days and intensify. Satellite imagery also shows that a band of thunderstorms are wrapping into the low-level center which is a sign of strengthening.

By Oct. 4, a sub-tropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure is expected to develop over southeastern China and that will help steer Gaemi west toward Vietnam.

Gaemi is forecast to slowly turn west toward the Vietnamese coastline and make landfall south of Hue by Oct. 6.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Oct. 1, 2012

AIRS captured this image of Tropical Depression 21W as a developing low pressure area on Sept. 30. › View larger image
Infrared imagery from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Depression 21W as a developing low pressure area on Sept. 30. The purple areas indicate the most powerful thunderstorms with coldest cloud top temperatures.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Observes Another Tropical Depression Birth in Northwestern Pacific

The twenty-first tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean was born as a NASA satellite flew overhead on Oct. 1, capturing its "baby picture" in infrared light.

On Monday, Oct. 1 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Depression 21W (TD21W) had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots. It was centered about300 nautical miles south of Hong Kong, near 17.4 North latitude and 114.8 East longitude. TD21W has tracked northward at 5 knots and is expected to curve to the northwest and west.

On Oct. 1, 2012, infrared imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite shows that the center of circulation is well-defined and the strongest thunderstorms are building in the southeastern quadrant of the storm and wrapping into the center.

The system has been quasi-stationary over the past 12 hours, because it is in a weak steering environment with nothing to push the storm in any direction.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect that Tropical Depression 21W will start moving to the west and approach the central Vietnam coast by Oct. 6 or Oct. 7.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.