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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Fabio (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
07.19.12
 
NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data on the remnants of what was hurricane Fabio On July 18, 2012 › View larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data on the remnants of what was hurricane Fabio On July 18, 2012 at 2043 UTC (1:43 p.m. PDT). Light to moderate rainfall is seen in the yellow, green and blue areas, where rain was falling between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM satellite saw Fabio's remnants on July 18, in cool ocean waters. › View larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite saw Fabio's remnants on July 18, 2012 at 2043 UTC in the cool ocean waters with temperatures of about 19 Celsius (66.2 Fahrenheit).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
TRMM Sees Fabio's Remnants Fading in Cool Pacific Waters

NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that Fabio's remnants have "chilled out" in very cool waters of the Eastern Pacific, while only dropping light to moderate rains.

On July 18, 2012 at 2043 UTC (1:43 p.m. PDT), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite saw the remnants of what was once Hurricane Fabio southwest of the California coast. Upper level winds were shearing it apart and cool ocean waters with temperatures of about 19 Celsius (66.2 Fahrenheit) near the center of the low's circulation were chilling it at the surface. Temperatures of 26.6 C (80F) are needed to maintain a tropical cyclone, and the area where Fabio's remnants are located are weakening the low pressure area.

A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments showed that the remnant low contained only light to moderate rainfall. This area of rainfall was shown to be located well to north of the low's center. Fabio's remnants are expected to dissipate on July 19 or 20 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



















July 18, 2012
AIRS passed over post-tropical storm Fabio on July 18 and detected very little strong convection and heavy rainfall (blue area). › View larger image
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over post-tropical storm Fabio on July 18 at 1023 UTC (6:23 a.m. EDT) it detected very little strong convection and heavy rainfall (blue area). Sea surface temperature dropped below 22 Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit) and can't support a tropical cyclone.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Withering post-tropical Storm Fabio Moving Toward Coast

Infrared satellite data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a very small area of strong thunderstorms north of the center of what is now post-tropical storm Fabio as it moves toward the southern California coast.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over post-tropical storm Fabio on July 18 at 1023 UTC (6:23 a.m. EDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured temperatures of cloud tops and the sea surface. AIRS data showed very little strong convection and heavy rainfall occurring in the post-tropical storm and it was north of the center of circulation. Wind shear from the south is pushing the showers north of the center.

Sea surface temperatures are not warm enough to support a tropical cyclone because they are colder than 22 Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit) in the area Fabio is moving through.

At 11 a.m. EDT on July 18, the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on post-tropical storm Fabio. At that time, Fabio was about 535 miles (855 km) south-southwest of San Diego, California, near latitude 25.7 north and longitude 120.8 west. Fabio's maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph (45 kmh) and weakening. It was still moving to the north at 9 mph (15 kmh) but is expected to turn to the north-northeast.

Doppler radar images from San Diego, Calif. showed some shower activity from Fabio approaching the area at 11 a.m. EDT on July 18.

The National Hurricane Center expects Fabio to dissipate in a couple of days. Meanwhile, large ocean swells, rip tides and dangerous surf conditions continue to affect the coasts of Baja California, Mexico and southern California.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 17, 2012
AIRS saw Fabio's cloud top temperatures were warming (blue), indicating weakening. › View larger image
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Fabio on July 16 at 2135 UTC it saw cloud top temperatures were warming (blue) indicating weakening. Sea surface temperature dropped below 22 Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Watching Tropical Storm Fabio Head to Southern California

Southern California's coast is already feeling rough surf from Tropical Storm Fabio, and as the storm draws closer it is expected to bring scattered showers and thunderstorms as well. NASA's Aqua satellite peered into Fabio's clouds to see what power lurks under them, and saw only a small area of heavy rainfall remaining and the cooler waters that Fabio is now moving through.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Fabio on July 16 at 2135 UTC (5:35 p.m. EDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured temperatures of cloud tops and the sea surface. Cloud top temperatures were warming indicating the strength of uplift in the storm was decreasing and the power was going out of the cyclone. The weakening trends is a result of ocean temperatures. When AIRS measured the sea surface temperatures around Fabio, they had dropped below 22 Celsius (71.6 Fahrenheit). Sea surface temperatures of 26.6 C (80F) are needed to maintain a tropical cyclone. When Aqua passed over Fabio early on July 17, the AIRS instrument saw the coldest cloud top temperatures were confined to a small area east of the center of circulation, an indication Fabio had weakened more.

On July 17 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/8 a.m. PDT), Tropical Storm Fabio had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kmh). Fabio was located near latitude 22.3 north and longitude 120.5 west. Fabio is moving toward the north near 12 mph (19 kmh). The National Hurricane Center expects Fabio to turn to the north-northeast during the night-time hours on July 17. Additional weakening is forecast and the National Hurricane Center expects Fabio to fizzle to a remnant low pressure area overnight or on Wednesday, July 18.

Despite the weakening trend in Fabio, regional warnings are in effect for the coasts of Baja California and southern California. Fabio is generating large swells, ripe tides and dangerous surf conditions. In addition to rough surf, Fabio is expected to have a wet impact on southern California. The Los Angeles area is expected to see some effects from Hurricane Fabio, according to the local National Weather Service Office there. Fabio's remnants will bring a chance for some showers and thunderstorms on Wednesday, July 18. Hurricane Fabio's remnants are expected to impact the San Diego area late Wednesday through early Thursday, according to the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS weather discussion today, July 17, noted, "Mid and high level moisture from the remnants of hurricane Fabio will move northward across the area bringing a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms."

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 16, 2012
This GOES-15 image was taken on July 16, 2012 and shows the remnants of Hurricane Emilia and Hurricane Fabio › View larger image
This image was taken on July 16, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) from the GOES-15 satellite. It shows the remnants of Hurricane Emilia southeast of Hawaii, and Hurricane Fabio far to the east. Emilia is seen by infrared imagery because the storm is in darkness, while Fabio is seen in visible light.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Satellite Sees Hurricane Fabio Still Chasing Emilia's Remnants in Pacific Ocean

Hurricane Fabio continues to be the big tropical news maker in the Eastern Pacific, while the Central Pacific Hurricane Center is tracking the remnants of Hurricane Emilia. Both storms were captured on one satellite image from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on July 16.

Emilia's remnants appear as a light swirl of clouds on satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite. GOES-15 sits in a fixed orbit over the western U.S. and provides weather imagery. In an image from July 16 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) while Hawaii was still in the pre-dawn hours, infrared imagery on GOES-15 captured the ghostly image of Hurricane Emilia's remnants. Those remnants were about 800 miles east-southeast of Hilo and are moving to the west at close to 20 mph. The National Hurricane Center noted that conditions are not favorable for re-development.

Meanwhile, the showstopper continues to be Hurricane Fabio, although now weaker than it was over the weekend. Fabio is in the daylight and is shown in GOES-15 visible imagery. Both the infrared and visible imagery were combined by NASA's GOES Project, located at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NOAA manages the GOES satellites, but NASA's GOES project creates images and animations.

At 11 a.m. EDT on July 16, Fabio took a northwesterly turn. Fabio is now headed northwest at 8 mph (13 kmh) and is expected to turn to the north over the next couple of days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Fabio is also moving into cooler waters which is expected to weaken the tropical cyclone down to depression status. Fabio's maximum sustained winds were still near 75 mph (120 kmh) at 11 a.m. EDT. Fabio was centered near 18.9 North and 119.9 West, about 700 miles (1,130 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

As Fabio continues to move closer to Baja California, ocean swells and rip currents are a concern along the coast there as well as in southern California.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 13, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Fabio's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Fabio's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012. Cloud top temperatures (purple) were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall, all falling over open ocean.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Strength in Intensifying Tropical Storm Fabio

NASA's Aqua satellite measured temperatures in Tropical Storm Fabio's clouds as it continued to move away from the Mexican coast and into the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Very cold cloud top temperatures show strong thunderstorms within Fabio that hint at the storm's potential to strengthen into a hurricane.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Fabio's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012 at 1723 UTC (1:23 p.m. EDT). The strongest thunderstorms with the coldest cloud top temperatures appeared to be west, south and east of the center of circulation. Cloud top temperatures in those areas were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall, all falling over open ocean.

On July 13 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Tropical Storm Fabio's maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kmh), just 4 mph under hurricane status. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Fabio to cross that threshold later today. Fabio was about 500 miles (805 km) west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico near 15.0 North and 110.6 West. Fabio is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kmh) and this general motion is expected to continue over the weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 12, 2012
Tropical Depression 06E was seen by the TRMM satellite on July 12, 2012 at 0632 UTC (2:32 a.m. EDT). › View larger image Tropical Depression 06E was seen by the TRMM satellite on July 12, 2012 at 0632 UTC (2:32 a.m. EDT). TD06E had mostly light to moderate rainfall – seen in the yellow, green and blue areas, where rain was falling between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. However, some heavy rainfall (red) and hot towering clouds were seen around the center of circulation.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Hot Towers as Tropical Storm Fabio's Trigger

NASA research has indicated whenever "Hot Towering" thunderstorms are spotted within a tropical cyclone, it is more likely to strengthen. NASA's TRMM satellite saw hot towers within newborn Tropical Depression 06E when it passed overhead early on July 12 and it later became Tropical Storm Fabio.

Tropical Depression 06E (TD06E) was seen by the TRMM satellite on July 12, 2012 at 0632 UTC (2:32 a.m. EDT). TD06E had mostly light to moderate rainfall where rain was falling between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. However, some heavy rainfall (red) and hot towering clouds were seen around the center of circulation. Data was used to create a snapshot of TD06E's rainfall by Hal Pierce of the TRMM team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

A "hot tower" is a tall cumulonimbus cloud that reaches at least to the top of the troposphere, the lowest layer of the atmosphere. It extends approximately nine miles (14.5 km) high in the tropics. The hot tower in Tropical Depression 06E was over 9.3 miles (15 km) high. These towers are called "hot" because they rise to such altitude due to the large amount of latent heat. Water vapor releases this latent heat as it condenses into liquid.

Research by Owen Kelley and John Stout of George Mason University and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., shows that a tropical cyclone with a hot tower in its eyewall was twice as likely to intensify within six or more hours than a cyclone that lacked a tower.

On July 12, Tropical Depression 06E was "born" with maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). Less than nine hours later, TD06E became Tropical Storm Fabio, with maximum sustained winds up to 40 mph (65 kmh). It was located about 425 miles (680 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico near 13.6 north latitude and 107.2 west longitude. Fabio was moving to the west near 9 mph (15 kmh). The National Hurricane Center noted Fabio is expected to continue strengthening today.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 11, 2012
satellite image of Pacific Ocean storms › View larger image This crop of a GOES-15 image from July 11, 2012, shows the low pressure area called System 98E, which appears ripe for tropical development close to the Mexican coastline. The larger version of the image also shows Tropical Storm Daniel heading toward Hawaii, followed by Hurricane Emilia to the east.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Watching System 98E for Tropical Development

A low pressure system that appears to be chasing Hurricane Emilia in the Eastern Pacific Ocean is getting better organized. Satellite data shows that System 98E is showing better signs of circulation.

A visible image from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on July 11, 2012, showed Tropical Storm Daniel heading toward Hawaii, followed by Hurricane Emilia to the east, and further east is the low pressure area called System 98E, which appears ripe for tropical development. Daniel has lost its eye feature after weakening to a tropical storm, while Emilia's eye is still present. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project, located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NASA's GOES Project uses data from the NOAA satellite and creates images and animations.

According to the National Hurricane Center, shower activity associated with System 98E continues to organize. System 98E is located about 425 miles south of Manzanillo Mexico, and its in an environment of warm waters and low wind shear, which will help its development into a tropical depression. The National Hurricane Center gives the low an 80 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression over the next two days. If System 98E becomes a tropical storm, it would be named Fabio.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.