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Hurricane Season 2012: Hurricane Emilia (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
07.17.12
 
This visible image of the remnants of Hurricane Emilia was captured by NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on July 17, 2012› View larger image
This visible image of the remnants of Hurricane Emilia was captured by NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on July 17, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) as they lingered south-southeast of the big island.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Emilia's Remnants Seen Far South of Hilo, Hawaii

The remnants of what was once hurricane Emilia were spotted on imagery from the GOES-15 satellite today as it continues moving past Hilo, Hawaii.

Visible imagery from the GOES-15 satellite on July 17, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) showed an area of clouds associated with Emilia's remnants were located about 400 miles south-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The remnants are moving west at near 20 mph.

Emilia is contributing to some of the weather in the Hawaiian Islands, despite its distance. According to the National Weather Service, a strong surface high pressure area located about 1600 miles northeast of the islands continues bringing in strong trade winds to the islands, with low clouds and showers and some of that moisture is loosely associated with Emilia's remnants.

Because of strong wind shear and cold sea surface temperatures, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center gives Emilia a low chance, "near zero percent, of this system becoming a tropical cyclone within the next 48 hours."

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 16, 2012

This GOES-15 image was taken on July 16, 2012 and shows the remnants of Hurricane Emilia and Hurricane Fabio› View larger image
This image was taken on July 16, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) from the GOES-15 satellite. It shows the remnants of Hurricane Emilia southeast of Hawaii, and Hurricane Fabio far to the east. Emilia is seen by infrared imagery because the storm is in darkness, while Fabio is seen in visible light.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Satellite Sees Hurricane Fabio Still Chasing Emilia's Remnants in Pacific Ocean

Hurricane Fabio continues to be the big tropical news maker in the Eastern Pacific, while the Central Pacific Hurricane Center is tracking the remnants of Hurricane Emilia. Both storms were captured on one satellite image from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on July 16.

Emilia's remnants appear as a light swirl of clouds on satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite. GOES-15 sits in a fixed orbit over the western U.S. and provides weather imagery. In an image from July 16 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) while Hawaii was still in the pre-dawn hours, infrared imagery on GOES-15 captured the ghostly image of Hurricane Emilia's remnants. Those remnants were about 800 miles east-southeast of Hilo and are moving to the west at close to 20 mph. The National Hurricane Center noted that conditions are not favorable for re-development.

Meanwhile, the showstopper continues to be Hurricane Fabio, although now weaker than it was over the weekend. Fabio is in the daylight and is shown in GOES-15 visible imagery. Both the infrared and visible imagery were combined by NASA's GOES Project, located at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NOAA manages the GOES satellites, but NASA's GOES project creates images and animations.

At 11 a.m. EDT on July 16, Fabio took a northwesterly turn. Fabio is now headed northwest at 8 mph (13 kmh) and is expected to turn to the north over the next couple of days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Fabio is also moving into cooler waters which is expected to weaken the tropical cyclone down to depression status. Fabio's maximum sustained winds were still near 75 mph (120 kmh) at 11 a.m. EDT. Fabio was centered near 18.9 North and 119.9 West, about 700 miles (1,130 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

As Fabio continues to move closer to Baja California, ocean swells and rip currents are a concern along the coast there as well as in southern California.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 13, 2012

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Emilia's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012 at 5:59 p.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Emilia's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012 at 5:59 p.m. EDT. The strongest thunderstorms with the coldest cloud top temperatures are in a small area south of the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Warming Cloud Tops in Weakening Emilia

NASA's Aqua satellite measured temperatures in Tropical Storm Emilia's clouds and noticed a warming trend. That's a signal that the storm doesn't have as much power or "uplift" and is weakening.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a look at Tropical Storm Emilia's cloud top temperatures on July 12, 2012 at 2159 UTC (5:59 p.m. EDT). The strongest thunderstorms with the coldest cloud top temperatures are in a small area south of the center of circulation. Cloud top temperatures in that area was as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall. However, cloud top temperatures around most of the rest of the storm were warmer than they were 24 hours ago and are warming more as cloud heights drop.

On July 13 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Tropical Storm Fabio's maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph (100 kmh). Emilia was about 1,165 miles (1875 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico near 15.6 North and 126.0 West. Emilia is moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kmh) and this general motion is expected to continue over the weekend. As Emilia continues westward, wind shear is expected to take its toll on the storm, and according to the National Hurricane Center, she could be a remnant low on Sunday, July 15.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, Md.



July 12, 2012

The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 11, 2012.› View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 11, 2012 at 2120 UTC / 5:20 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
The AIRS NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Hurricane Emilia on July 12, 2012› View larger image
The AIRS NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Hurricane Emilia on July 12, 2012 at 0929 UTC / 5:29 a.m. EDT. The purple area shows strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops, and the yellow circle in the middle is the eye of the hurricane.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Providing Two Views of Hurricane Emilia

NASA's Aqua satellite has several instruments onboard that are providing forecasters with different views of Hurricane Emilia in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The infrared view hinted that Emilia would strengthen and it regained Category 3 Hurricane status today.

On Wednesday, July 11, 2012 at 2120 UTC (5:20 p.m. EDT/2:20 p.m. PDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of Hurricane Emilia that showed an eye with some high clouds overhead. The next day, Thursday, July 12, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on Aqua captured an infrared image of Hurricane Emilia at 0929 UTC / 5:29 a.m. EDT. The infrared data showed strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops surrounding the eye of the hurricane. Some of the cloud top temperatures were almost as cold as 210 kelvin (-81.6 Fahrenheit/-63.1 Celsius), indicating powerful thunderstorms approaching the top of the troposphere.

Those observations of powerful thunderstorms around Emilia's eye happened before Emilia again strengthened and were an indication that the storm would intensify. By 11 a.m. EDT on July 12, Emilia's maximum sustained winds had increased again to near 115 mph (185 kmh) and Emilia regained category three hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. The center of Hurricane Emilia was located near latitude 15.1 north and longitude 121.4 west. That's about 925 miles (1485 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Emilia is moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kmh) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next two days. Because Emilia is headed toward cooler waters, she is again expected to weaken over the next several days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, Md.








July 11, 2012

Slug: Satellite Sees Hurricane Emilia Chasing Tropical Storm Daniel


An animation of satellite observations from July 8 (6:00 p.m. EDT) to July 11 (1:30 p.m. EDT) shows Hurricane Daniel as it loses its hurricane eye and become a tropical storm as it heads toward Hawaii. East of Daniel, Emilia became a Category 4 hurricane on July 10 and weakened as it follows Daniel. Observations from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite. TRT :33 Super(s): Courtesy: NASA/NOAA GOES Project Center Contact: Rob Gutro (301) 286-4044 HQ Contact: Steve Cole (202) 358-0918 For more information: www.nasa.gov/hurricane




NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 10, 2012 at 2035 UTC / 4:35 p.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 10, 2012 at 2035 UTC / 4:35 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Emilia as a Category 2 Hurricane Now

Hurricane Emilia reached peak intensity yesterday, July 10, when its maximum sustained winds hit 140 mph (220 kmh). Today, July 11, Emilia has weakened to a Category 2 hurricane. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Emilia during its weakening phase.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 10, 2012 at 2035 UTC / 4:35 p.m. EDT when its winds had weakened down to 125 mph (205 kmh). Emilia continued weakening after Aqua passed by.

On July 11 at 5 a.m. EDT, Emilia's maximum sustained winds were near 105 mph (165 kmh) and is now a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Emilia is over 210 miles (330 km) in diameter, which is the extent of its tropical-storm-force winds. On July 11 the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that cloud top temperatures around Emilia's eye were still as cold as -94 Fahrenheit (-70 Celsius) indicating the eye is still surrounded by powerful thunderstorms.

Emilia was located about 720 miles (1160 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Emilia is moving at 10 mph (17 kmh) to the west-northwest. Emilia is expected to continue moving in the same direction because it is skirting the southern edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure (which rotates clockwise), located to its north.

The National Hurricane Center expects Emilia to continue on a weakening trend as it moves over cooler waters and runs into drier and more stable air as wind shear increases.

For larger image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Emilia.A2012192.2035.250m.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, Md.



July 10, 2012

MODIS captured this image of Emilia in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 9, 2012 at 1825 UTC / 2:25 p.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Emilia following Tropical Storm Daniel in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 9, 2012 at 1825 UTC / 2:25 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Gets a Cold Stare from Emilia's Eye

NASA's Aqua satellite got a cold stare from Emilia. Infrared satellite data revealed that cloud top temperatures around Hurricane Emilia's eye were bitter cold.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite measured cloud top temperatures in the powerful thunderstorms surrounding Emilia's eye to be colder than -94 Fahrenheit (-70 Celsius). That indicates that they're very high in the troposphere, and very powerful (which would coincide with Emilia being a major hurricane).

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Emilia on July 9, 2012 at 1825 UTC / 2:25 p.m. EDT, and Emilia's eye was clearly visible in the image.

Emilia exploded from a Category 2 hurricane to a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale since yesterday. Today, July 10 at 5 a.m. EDT, Emilia's maximum sustained winds were near 140 mph (220 kmh). By 11 a.m. EDT, Emilia's maximum sustained winds dropped to 130 mph (215 kmh),still holding to Category 4 hurricane status. Emilia was located about 685 miles (1100 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Emilia is moving at 10 mph (17 kmh) to the west-northwest.

The National Hurricane Center expects Emilia to continue weakening tonight through Thursday, July 12.

Behind Emilia to the east, lies System 98E, a tropical low pressure area that appears to be developing. The National Hurricane Center gives System 98E a 40 percent chance for development over the next couple of days. That means that while Emilia is chasing Tropical Storm Daniel (west of Emilia), there may be another named storm chasing Emilia in the next couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, Md.



July 9, 2012

3-D view of Daniel shows that very little rainfall was present in the western side and that most of Daniel's structure was at lower levels.› View larger image
TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data show a 3-D view of Daniel (looking from the west). This view shows that very little rainfall was present in the western side. This image also shows that most of Daniels structure was at lower levels. A few of the most powerful storms in the eastern side of Daniel's eye wall reached to heights of about 11km (~6.8 miles).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
Hurricane Daniel on July 9, 2012 at 0913 UTC when Daniel had started to weaken.› View larger image
Hurricane Daniel was seen by the TRMM satellite on July 9, 2012 at 0913 UTC ( 2:13 AM PDT). Daniel had started to weaken. Rainfall data from TRMM's Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar instruments show that only light to moderate rainfall was contained in Daniel's rain bands.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Daniel in the eastern Pacific on July 8, 2012 at 1920 UTC 3:20 p.m.› View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Daniel in the eastern Pacific on July 8, 2012 at 1920 UTC 3:20 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
MODIS captured this visible image of Emilia when it was a tropical storm off the western coast of Mexico on July 8.› View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Emilia when it was a tropical storm off the western coast of Mexico on July 8, 2012 at 1745 UTC 1:45 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
This TRMM image of rainfall rates in Tropical Storm Emilia was captured on July 8, before she became a hurricane.› View larger image
This TRMM image of rainfall rates in Tropical Storm Emilia was captured on July 8, before she became a hurricane. The heavy rain (in red) was falling at a rate of more than 2 inches/50 mm per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Analyzes Twin Hurricanes in the Eastern Pacific

There are two hurricanes in the Eastern Pacific today, Daniel and Emilia. NASA's TRMM satellite passed over both storms in pinpointed the intensity of the rainfall within each storm, indicative of their power. Emilia is dropping rain at a greater rate than Daniel according to satellite data.

Tropical storm Daniel strengthened and became the third hurricane over the weekend, and today, Monday, July 9, Tropical Storm Emilia strengthened into the fourth hurricane of the season. Tropical storm Emilia formed on July 7 as tropical depression 5E and became a tropical storm on July 8. On July 9, Emilia is trailing Daniel by 645 miles in the eastern Pacific, as both storms continue to move away from land.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite recently saw both tropical cyclones. TRMM flew above hurricane Daniel on July 8, 2012 at 0019 UTC (July 7, 2012 5:19 p.m. PDT) and over Emilia when it was a tropical storm on July 8, 2012 at 0837 UTC (1:37 a.m. PDT). Rainfall data collected with TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on enhanced infrared and visible images from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. to show the intensity of the rain falling within each storm.

TRMM noticed only light-to-moderate rainfall happening within Daniel, as the hurricane continues to weaken. Light-to-moderate rainfall means rain is falling between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour.

When TRMM passed over Tropical Storm Emilia on July 8, before she became a hurricane, data showed various areas of heavy rainfall in bands of thunderstorms along the northwestern, north, and eastern quadrants, feeding into the center. The heavy rain was falling at a rate of more than 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Surrounding the areas of heavy rain were large areas of light-to-moderate rainfall between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour.

NASA's Terra satellite also passed over both storms, providing a clear, visible image of the cloud cover and extent on July 8. At that time, compact Daniel had a visible eye, while Emilia did not, and was still getting organized.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Daniel in the eastern Pacific on July 8, 2012 at 1920 UTC 3:20 p.m. EDT that showed the tight circulation of the storm, and a small cloud-filled eye.

On July 9, Hurricane Daniel had maximum sustained winds near 85 mph (140 kmh). The center of Daniel was about 1355 miles (2185 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near latitude 15.3 north and longitude 129.1 west. The National Hurricane Center reports that "Daniel is moving toward the west near 15 mph (24 kmh) and this general motion with a slight increase in forward speed is expected during the next couple of days. Slow weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours."

Hurricane-force winds only extend out 25 miles (35 km) from the center, and tropical storm-force winds extend out up to 115 miles (185 km), making Daniel about 230 miles in diameter.

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Emilia when it was a tropical storm off the western coast of Mexico on July 8, 2012 at 1745 UTC 1:45 p.m. EDT. The storm appeared comma-shaped, but there was no visible eye in the center of circulation.

Emilia underwent rapid intensification today, July 9, from a tropical storm in the morning hours (Pacific Daylight Time/local time) into a category two hurricane. Emilia's maximum sustained winds were near 100 mph (160 kmh) and the National Hurricane Center noted that she could become a major hurricane (Category Three) later today. Emilia was located about 710 miles (1145 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California. Emilia is moving at 12 mph (19 kmh) to the west-northwest.

Just like Daniel, Emilia's hurricane force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center of circulation, but Emilia's tropical-storm-force winds are much smaller in area, extending to 80 miles (130 km). Size doesn't matter here, though, because Emilia is expected to become a major hurricane in the next day, while Daniel weakens.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro / Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center / SSAI, Greenbelt, Md.