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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Debby (Atlantic Ocean/Caribbean Sea)
06.28.12
 
MODIS captured this visible image of the remnants of Debby over the Atlantic Ocean on June 28, 2012 at 15:20 UTC› View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of the remnants of Tropical Storm Debby over the Atlantic Ocean on June 28, 2012 at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
This Cloudsat image of Debby was captured on June 24, 2012, when Debby was in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.› View larger image
This Cloudsat image of Tropical Storm Debby was captured on June 24, 2012, when Debby was in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The colors indicate the intensity of the reflected radar energy. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice, while the wavy blue lines on the bottom center of the image indicate intense rainfall.
› View this animation of Cloudsat's overpass of Tropical Storm Debby on June 24 from 3:02 p.m. to 3:03 p.m. EDT, when Debby was in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.
Photo & Animation Credit: NASA/JPL/
Colorado State University/Naval Research Laboratory-Monterey
Debby's Remnants Have Small Chance for a Comeback

The remnants of Tropical Storm Debby are out in the Atlantic Ocean, and still have a small chance for a tropical comeback. NASA's Terra satellite provided a close-up look at Debby yesterday and revealed that the circulation center is still visible.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Storm Debby over the Atlantic Ocean on June 28, 2012 at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT). The image clearly showed a circulation center.

On June 29 at 8 a.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that the remnants of Debby were located 90 miles north-northwest of Bermuda and moving east-northeastward at 20 to 25 mph. Debby's remnants were still producing gale-force winds near its center, although shower activity was minimal.

The NHC gives Debby just a 10 percent chance of regenerating into a tropical depression over the next two days.

For the high resolution MODIS image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Debby.A2012180.1520.2km.jpg.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.























June 28, 2012
NASA Makes a Satellite Close-up of Tropical Storm Debby

Once a tropical storm forms in the Gulf of Mexico, it does damage when making landfall and crossing over land. Tropical Storm Debby was particularly destructive, swirling for days in the corner of Florida's panhandle, picking up moisture that fell as feet of rain across northern Florida. This closeup animation of Tropical Storm Debby was created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, using NOAA's GOES-13 satellite data from June 22-27, 2012. At the end of the animation the circular center of Debby can be seen exiting Florida, into the Atlantic Ocean, east of St. Augustine. Credit: NASA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters




Debby's highest rainfall totals from June 20-27 are in excess of 380 mm (~15 inches, shown in purple).› View larger image
Debby's highest rainfall totals from June 20-27 are in excess of 380 mm (~15 inches, shown in purple). The heaviest rains cover a wide patch of central Florida from around Titusville on the east coast to around Homosassa Springs on the west coast within which amounts exceed 260 mm (~10 inches, shown in orange) to over 380 mm in the center. Another band of heavy rain runs east-west across no.Florida from Jacksonville to near Tallahassee. The highest totals are around Lake City and exceed 380 mm.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates within Tropical Depression Debby on June 27.› View larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates within Tropical Depression Debby on June 27. The yellow, green and blue areas indicate light-to-moderate rainfall between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. The red area is considered heavy rainfall at 2 inches/50 mm per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
AIRS indicated the strongest (purple) showers and thunderstorms were elongated over the Atlantic Ocean.› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Debby on June 27 on 1747 UTC (1:47 p.m. EDT). Infrared data from the AIRS instrument onboard, indicated the strongest (purple) showers and thunderstorms were elongated over the Atlantic Ocean.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's TRMM Satellite Measures Debby's Drenching Florida Rains

NASA's TRMM satellite provided data that allowed scientists to calculate Tropical Storm Debby's rainfall totals across Florida. The highest rainfall totals from June 20-27 topped 380 mm (~15 inches) in a wide patch of central Florida from around Titusville on the east coast.

Even though it never became more than a tropical storm, the residents of northern and central Florida will remember Debby. Debby, which formed as a tropical storm on the 23rd of June 2012 in the central Gulf of Mexico, took three full days to reach the Big Bend of Florida just 350 miles away. Although the center didn't make landfall until around 5 p.m. EDT on the afternoon of June 26 when it crossed the coast near Steinhatchee, Florida, Debby's effects were felt well away from the center.

Most of the rain and weather associated with Debby were well to the north and east of the center over Florida, which was effectively inundated with rain squalls originating over the Gulf and wrapping around the eastern side of the storm for 3 days. The result was copious amounts of rain over the central and northern parts of the state in addition to an outbreak of tornadoes over central and southern Florida on June 24.

In addition to capturing detailed images of tropical storms, TRMM is ideally suited to measure rainfall from space. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

For increased coverage, TRMM is used to calibrate rainfall estimates from other additional satellites. The TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. is used to estimate rainfall over a wide portion of the globe. TMPA rainfall totals are shown here for the 7-day period June 20 to 27, 2012 over and around Florida.

TRMM data showed that the highest rainfall totals for the period are in excess of 380 mm (~15 inches). The heaviest rains cover a wide patch of central Florida from around Titusville on the east coast to around Homosassa Springs on the west coast within which amounts exceed 260 mm (~10 inches) to over 380 mm (~15 inches) in the center. Another band of heavy rain is oriented east-west across northern Florida from Jacksonville to near Tallahassee with similar amounts or rain.The highest totals in the band occur around Lake City and exceed 380 mm (~15 inches). This east-west band can be attributed to the interaction of Debby's counterclockwise circulation with the coast and a frontal boundary draped across southern Georgia in an east-west orientation.

After coming ashore, Debby was downgraded to a tropical depression as it crossed northern Florida.

At 5 p.m. EDT on June 27, Debby lost tropical characteristics and became a post-tropical cyclone over the Atlantic Ocean. At that time Debby had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kmh) and it was located about180 miles (295 km) east of St. Augustine, Fla., near 29.5 North and 78.3 West.

On Thursday, June 28, 2012 at 8 a.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center noted that showers and thunderstorms associated with post-tropical storm Debby were about 175 miles west-northwest of Bermuda. The shower and thunderstorm activity increased today and the winds are between 15 and 20 mph.Post-tropical Storm Debby continues to move to the northeast and the National Hurricane Center noted that it has a 10 percent chance of re-generating.

Text Credit: Steve Lang and Hal Pierce
SSAI / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





June 27, 2012
Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Debby Move into Atlantic


An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico into the Atlantic Ocean. Clouds around the center appear to fade in infrared imagery and are more evident in visible imagery. The strongest storms appear east of the center. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. TRT :41. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project Center Contact: Rob Gutro (443) 858-1779



Debby's center (the tight swirl over central eastern Florida) is now moving off the eastern shore of Florida› View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Depression Debby was taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Wednesday, June 27 at 8:31 a.m. EDT. The bulk of Debby's clouds and showers were over the Atlantic and coupled with a frontal system, as Debby's center (the tight swirl over central eastern Florida) is now moving off the eastern shore of Florida.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Debby Now Exiting Florida's East Coast, Disorganized on Satellite Imagery

Debby has tracked across Florida from the Gulf coast to the Atlantic coast, and the interaction with land has taken its toll on the storm's organization. In GOES-13 satellite imagery today, June 27, the bulk of clouds and showers associated with Debby are now over the Atlantic Ocean and Debby's circulation center is seen exiting the state and moving into the Atlantic Ocean.

Whenever a storm moves over land it encounters friction, that weakens it. It is also cut off from its power source of warm waters, adding to that weakening. That's what happened to Debby over the last day as it moved towards the Atlantic coast.

Debby has left a legacy of flooding in its wake. Many areas of northern Florida have received up to 10 inches of rain, with higher totals in isolated areas. Even sections of Florida's main east-west highway, Interstate 10, was shut down due to flooding.

On Wednesday, June 27, 2012 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Debby's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (55 kmh). It was located about 25 miles (45 km) southeast of St. Augustine, Florida, near latitude 29.6 north and longitude 81.0 west. Debby is moving east-northeast near 10 mph (17 kmh) and is expected to continue in this direction over the next couple of days while speeding up. Debby should gradually move away from Florida today, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A visible image of Tropical Depression Debby was taken from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Wednesday, June 27 at 8:31 a.m. EDT. It showed that t bulk of Debby's clouds and showers were over the Atlantic and coupled with a frontal system as Debby's center is now moving off the eastern shore of Florida. NOAA manages the GOES-13 satellite and NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. uses the data to create images and animations.

The National Hurricane Center noted that some re-strengthening is possible as the system moves to the northeast and away from Florida.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 26, 2012
Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Debby Soak Florida


An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 24-26, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center is almost stationary in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico over that period, while most of the storm's rainfall and winds stretch from the northern quadrant, east to southeast of the center. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. TRT :51 Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project



A large band of intense rain lies just off shore, while light to moderate rain covers a broad area of the Florida peninsula.› View larger image
A large band of intense rain (darker red) lies just off shore, while light (blue areas) to moderate rain covers a broad area of the Florida peninsula.Moderate rain (shown in green) north and east of the center extends from near Tampa Bay all the way around to near Panama City. Tornado symbols mark the locations of tornado reports.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
This TRMM image from June 25 at 1054 UTC (6:54 a.m. EDT) shows Debby's center is still over the Gulf (red storm symbol)› View larger image
This TRMM image from June 25 at 1054 UTC (6:54 a.m. EDT) shows Debby's center is still over the Gulf (red storm symbol) and the bulk of rainfall continues over Florida and out into the Atlantic today.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
Animated blend from the infrared (IR) and visible data to TRMM TMI/PR rainfall data.› Click here to see an animated blend from the infrared (IR) and visible data to TRMM TMI/PR rainfall data. The heaviest rainfall appears in red, and is just west of the western Florida coast.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA Measuring Tropical Storm Debby's Heavy Rains from Space

Tropical Storm Debby continues to be a big rainmaker in Florida and southern Georgia and NASA's TRMM satellite has measured those rainfall rates from space, showing where heavy rain has fallen.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is basically a flying rain gauge in space. Scientists use TRMM data to calculate rainfall rates and rain totals from space. TRMM imagery from June 25 showed Debby's heaviest rains were falling at a rate of over 2 inches (50 mm) per hour, and to the southeast of the center.

Debby has been a huge rainmaker. For example, Debby dumped nearly 7 inches of rain on Gainesville Sunday, June 24. That was Gainsville's second highest one day total. Numerous other reports of between 6 and 10 inches of rain have already been reported as a result of Debby.

Debby's Status Today:
Today, June 25, 2012, a tropical storm warning is in effect for the Florida Gulf coast from Mexico Beach to Englewood. At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC), Debby had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kmh). It was still centered in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, about 85 miles (140 km) west of Cedar Key, near 28.9 north latitude and 84.5 west longitude. The estimated minimum central pressure is 991 millibars. Debby is slowly moving toward the east near 3 mph (6 kmh) and is expected to move east-northeastward in the next couple of days, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). NHC forecasters note that Debby's center will weaken to a depression while moving over northern Florida in the next day or two.

Debby's History:
Tropical Storm Debby formed on the 23rd of June 2012 in the central Gulf of Mexico, becoming the earliest 4th named storm on record. Debby began as an area of low pressure that moved out of the northwestern Caribbean and into the Gulf. After forming on the afternoon of the 23rd, Debby has moved very slowly under the influence of weak steering currents.

Debby drifted ever so slowly northward on the night of the 23rd before turning northeast later on the morning of the 24th towards the northeast Gulf Coast of Florida. Despite its slow forward progress and lack of intensification, Debby has already lashed Florida with heavy rain as well as tornadoes.

What TRMM Data Reveals:
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (or TRMM) satellite captured an image of Debby when it passed over the storm in the north central Gulf of Mexico on the morning of June 24 at 11:51 UTC (6:51 a.m. CDT). TRMM revealed that most of the rain associated with Debby is well away from the center. A large area of moderate rain north and east of the center extends from near Tampa Bay all the way around to near Panama City. A large band of intense rain lay just off shore, while light to moderate rain covered a broad area of the Florida peninsula.

How Rainfall is Mapped:
Data from several TRMM instruments are used to create rainfall images at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Rain rates in the center of image swaths are from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), while those in the outer swaths are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are then overlaid on infrared (IR) and visible data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Coastal flooding and the potential for isolated tornadoes are continuing threats today. The storm is also expected to continue to bring very heavy rains to northern and central Florida where some areas could see in excess of 20 inches of rain. Storm speed is what matters most when it comes to rainfall; the slower the storm, the more time it has to rain over a given area.

Text Credit: Steve Lang / Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
TRMM / SSAI / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 25, 2012
MODIS captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Debby spinning in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico on Sunday, June 24.› View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Debby spinning in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was captured on Sunday, June 24 at 3:00 p.m. EDT from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
This visible image of Tropical Storm Debby was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 25, 2012 at 11:45 a.m. EDT.› View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Debby was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 25, 2012 at 11:45 a.m. EDT. The bulk of Debby's clouds and showers are on its eastern side.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Debby's Clouds Blanket Florida

Like a white blanket, Tropical Storm Debby's clouds covered the entire state of Florida in a NASA satellite image.

Two satellites have captured imagery that shows Tropical Storm Debby has thrown a large white blanket of clouds over the state of Florida, and it doesn't seem like that blanket is going to lift quickly as Debby moves slowly north.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Debby and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the satellite captured a visible image of the storm on Sunday, June 24 at 3:00 p.m. EDT. The image clearly showed Debby's center over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, and the bulk of the clouds, showers and thunderstorms wrapping from the north to the east to the south of the center of circulation and covering the entire state of Florida. The northern-most extent of Debby's clouds were over southern Alabama and south Georgia. Tropical-storm-force winds on June 25 extend outward up to 230 miles (370 km) mostly southeast of the center, and the imagery from MODIS shows that the cloud cover is most extensive in that direction.

On Monday, June 25, 2012 at 11 a.m. EDT, Debby's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 45 mph (75 kmh). It was located just 75 miles south of Apalachicola, Florida, near 28.6 North and 85.2 West. Debby was crawling to the north at 3 mph (6 kmh). Debby's minimum central pressure was 995 millibars.

On June 25, 2012 at 11:45 a.m. EDT a visible satellite image of Debby captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite showed that the storm's clouds continued to blanket all of Florida. The image also showed that the bulk of Debby's clouds and showers continued to be from northeast to southeast of the center of circulation, which was still in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Both the GOES-13 and the MODIS satellite images were created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Debby is expected to continue crawling to the northeast or east-northeast over the next couple of days, bringing more soaking rains for the sunshine state. The NHC doesn't expect much change in intensity, however.

As a result of Debby's new more northerly track, some of the warnings and watches have been changed as of 11 a.m. on June 25. The tropical storm warning from the Florida-Alabama border to Destin, Fla. has been discontinued. In addition, the tropical storm watch from the Suwannee River to Englewood has been changed to a tropical storm warning. The tropical storm warning area now covers the Florida Gulf Coast from Destin to Englewood.

A quick look at watches and warnings in effect on Monday, June 25 for three western Florida cities tell the story of what Debby is doing to its residents. In Tampa, there is a Tropical Storm Warning, a Coastal Flood Warning, a Tornado Watch, a Flood Warning, a High Surf Advisory and a Flood Watch as a result of Debby. Further north in Pensacola, there is a High Surf Advisory and a Wind Advisory. South of Tampa in Fort Myers,there is a Tornado Watch, Coastal Flood Advisory, High Surf Advisory and Flood Watch.

Tropical-storm-force winds are expected to continue over portions of the Florida Gulf coast today. Heavy rainfall is a key concern today, after Florida was soaked yesterday from Debby. According to the NHC, northern and central Florida can see accumulations of 10 to 20 inches with as much as 25 inches. Southeastern Georgia and extreme South Carolina will also feel Debby's wet wrath, as totals between 5 and 15 inches are possible in both areas.

Storm surges are expected to range between one and five feet along the Gulf coast between Apalachee Bay to southeastern Louisiana. Isolated tornadoes are also a threat as they are with any landfalling tropical cyclone. Some are possible today across the eastern Florida panhandle, Florida peninsula and southern Georgia.

NASA's Kennedy Space Center on the Atlantic coast is included in a tornado watch for the area due to a line of thunderstorms approaching from the west. Elevated winds are expected throughout the day and for the next few days. Between one to three inches of rainfall are expected over the next day, and are likely to continue as Debby crawls northward.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Debby Soak Gulf Coast States An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 23-25, 2012. The animation begins 12 hours after Debby became a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, 225 hundred miles south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River on June 23. This visualization was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., using observations from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. TRT :51. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project



System 96L became Tropical Storm Debby on June 23 as she continued to organize and strengthen.› Vew larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Debby when she became a tropical storm on June 23 as she continued to organize and strengthen. Infrared data from the AIRS instrument onboard, indicated the bulk of showers and thunderstorms stretched from the north to the east and southern quadrants.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Debby

Tropical Storm Debby formed from the low pressure area called System 96L, that NASA satellites were studying last week. NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the storm right after it strengthened into a tropical storm on June 23.

Debby was born Saturday, June 23 around 4 a.m. EDT as her maximum sustained winds whipped up to 50 mph very quickly. She was born about 220 miles (355 km) south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, near 26.2 North and 87.6 West. Debby was moving to the north at 6 mph (9 kmh).

In an infrared image taken on June 23 from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, the bulk of showers and thunderstorms (heaviest rainfall and strongest t-storms) were seen north, east and south of the center of circulation. That triggered heavy rainfall, flash flooding and isolated tornadoes in Florida this weekend.

By the next day, Sunday June 24 at 8 a.m. EDT, Debby's maximum sustained winds were near 60 MPH (95 kmh), and Debby was located about 170 miles (270 km) southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. That's about 195 miles southwest of Apalachicola, Fla. Debby slowed to a crawl in a northerly direction at 2 mph (4 kmh).

By early Monday, June 25, Debby was almost stationary in the Gulf of Mexico bringing heavy rain, storm surge, tropical-storm-force winds to several Gulf states. Watches and warnings on June 25 include: A tropical storm warning for east of the Alabama-Florida border eastward to the Suwannee River, Florida. A tropical storm watch is also in effect for south of the Suwannee River to Englewood Florida.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 22, 2012
This visible image of System 96L was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 22› View larger image
This visible image of System 96L was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 22 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Sees Tropical Trouble Brewing in Southern Gulf of Mexico

Imagery from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite has shown some towering thunderstorms within the low pressure area called System 96L, located in the southern Gulf of Mexico. NASA continues to create the imagery from the GOES satellite and NASA satellites are also monitoring the developing low. If it does organize further and become a tropical storm over the weekend, it would be named "Debby."

Its quite likely that the fourth tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Hurricane Season is brewing in the southern Gulf of Mexico, more specifically, in the Yucatan Channel. The Yucatan Channel lies between Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and western Cuba.

Tropical depressions seem have have a habit of forming on weekends, and this low appears to be following that habit. On Friday, June 22 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), System 96L was located near 22.5 North and 89.5 West, near the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula.

The GOES-13 satellite continually monitors the eastern U.S. and provides updated visible and infrared imagery. An image from June 22 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) shows a large low pressure area near the Yucatan's northern coast with disorganized showers and thunderstorms. In the image, some of the thunderstorms near the center of the low appear to be higher than the surrounding clouds,which indicates they are higher and stronger.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that atmospheric pressure on the surface continues to fall, indicating that the low pressure area is intensifying. Forecasters at NHC give System 96L a 70 percent chance of becoming the fourth tropical depression of the Atlantic Hurricane season, sometime over the weekend.

Meanwhile, System 96L is expected to move slowly northward into the Gulf of Mexico this weekend (June 23-24). The NHC notes "Interests along the entire United States Gulf Coast should monitor the progress of this disturbance through the weekend. Heavy rains and localized flooding are possible across the Yucatan peninsula, western Cuba, and southern Florida through Saturday."

For NASA updates over the weekend, visit NASA's Hurricane Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/NASAs-Hurricane-Web-Page/112998395413629 or NASA Hurricane's Twitter page:http://twitter.com/NASAHurricane.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 21, 2012
AIRS captured this infrared image of a low in the southern Gulf of Mexico on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT.› View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured this infrared image of a low in the southern Gulf of Mexico on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT. The strongest thunderstorms (purple) have high, cold cloud tops (of -63F/-52C)located southwest and southeast of the center.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Eyeing Southern Gulf of Mexico Low for Tropical Trouble

NASA satellites are providing data on a broad area of low pressure in the south-central Gulf of Mexico that has a medium chance for development into a tropical depression.

Infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite is helping forecasters at the National Hurricane Center understand what's happening with the low pressure area. In an image captured on June 21 at 0729 (3:29 a.m. EDT), the center of the low pressure area appears to be near the western tip of Cuba near 22 North and 85 West. The strongest thunderstorms and convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms) have high, cold cloud tops (of -63F/-52C) that indicate strong uplift, southwest and southeast of the center.

The National Hurricane Center noted that the large area of clouds, showers and thunderstorms extend from the northwestern Caribbean Sea north into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico and over Florida.

There are currently strong upper level winds that have been inhibiting development, but those winds are expected to weaken, giving the low more of a chance to get organized. The low continues to move north into the Gulf of Mexico bringning heavy rainfall and possible flooding over Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, western Cuba and southern Florida over the next couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.