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Hurricane Season 2012: Beryl (Western Atlantic Ocean)
06.01.12
 
This CloudSat image of Beryl shows the storm from its side. taken on May 27 at 1842 UTC (2:42 p.m. EDT). › View larger image
This CloudSat image of Beryl shows the storm from its side. It was taken on May 27 at 1842 UTC (2:42 p.m. EDT) and revealed some thunderstorms as tall as 8 miles into the atmosphere. Credit: Colorado State University

This CloudSat cross-section of Tropical Storm Beryl shows the path CloudSat took over the storm. › View larger image
This CloudSat cross-section of Tropical Storm Beryl shows the path CloudSat took over the storm. This image revealed that some of the thunderstorms in Beryl were near 8 miles high, and dropping heavy rainfall. Credit: Colorado State University
NASA's Cloudsat Analyzes Tropical Storm Beryl Sideways

NASA's CloudSat satellite passed over Tropical Storm Beryl when it was just off the coast of Florida and before it made landfall. CloudSat provided a side view of the storm that gave scientists information about cloud height, extent and rainfall. Cloudsat saw some thunderstorms within Beryl were eight miles high.

On May 27, 2012 at 1840 UTC (2:40 p.m. EDT) when CloudSat passed over Tropical Storm Beryl, the storm was slowly intensifying and moving westward with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph (100 kph). CloudSat (blue line) intersects Beryl about 200 km east of the storm center. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flies aboard NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites and flies in line with CloudSat above the Earth in what is called the "A-train of satellites."

Beryl had slightly intensified during the past 6 hours and was moving westward toward the Florida coast. It was starting to take on more features typical of a tropical cyclone rather than a subtropical low, as the system was first classified. CloudSat data indicated an eye was starting to form and convection and rainfall increased around the center of the storm, most notably on the east side of the storm by the bright white clouds tops. The CloudSat overpass revealed the mid and upper level clouds associated with the outer bands and cirrus anvil clouds extending outward from the system. Maximum cloud top heights are around 12-13 Km (7.4-8.0 miles) along this CloudSat intersection of the system.

The MODIS natural color imagery picked up the small cumulus and stratus thunderstorms cells over portions of North Carolina and Virginia that the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar instrument for the most part does not detect. CloudSat observed some of the taller cumulus cells (around 2-3 km-1.2 to 1.8 miles in vertical height.

For more information and an animation of CloudSat's overpass, visit: http://cloudsat.atmos.colostate.edu/news/Tropical_Storm_Beryl.

Natalie Tourville
Colorado State University



May 31, 2012
This is a color-coded image of TRMM rainfall totals from Beryl. › View larger image
This is a color-coded image of TRMM rainfall totals from Beryl. Appropriate storm symbols are overlaid showing the storm's track and intensity. The highest rainfall totals over land occur over the north-central Florida peninsula where they are upwards of 80 mm (~3 inches, shown in gold). Locally, upwards of a foot of rain was reported across portions of north Florida. Meanwhile lighter amounts (shown in light blue) extend across southeast Georgia with somewhat heavier amounts across North and South Carolina.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce
NOAA GOES-13 animation of Beryl over North Carolina and its progression into the Atlantic Ocean. › View GOES-13 animation
This NOAA GOES-13 animation of satellite imagery shows Tropical Depression Beryl over North Carolina on May 29 and its progression into the Atlantic Ocean where it merged with a frontal system by May 31.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project.
Tropical Storm Beryl Brings Some Much Needed Drought Relief to the Southeast

Tropical Storm Beryl was actually a welcome sight in parts of the Southeast. Tropical cyclones are not always bad news. Sometimes they can be quite beneficial, especially when it comes to relieving drought conditions.

The last advisory from the National Hurricane Center was issued on Tropical Depression Beryl was issued on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). Tropical depression Beryl was located about 5 miles west of Wilmington, N.C. near 43.2 North and 78.0 West. It had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (35 mph) and was moving to the east-northeast near 11 knots. Beryl was emerging over water and transitioned into an extra-tropical low. NOAA GOES-13 satellite imagery on May 31 shows the remnant low pressure area moved quickly to the northeast once in the Atlantic Ocean and merged with a frontal system.

Tropical Storm Beryl made landfall just after midnight (local time) on the night of May 27, 2012, near Jacksonville Beach, Florida as a strong tropical storm with sustained winds of 70 mph, making it the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in the U.S. before the official June 1st start of the Atlantic hurricane season. Prior to the arrival of Beryl, many parts of the Southeast were experiencing severe drought conditions. Parts of north Florida, from around Jacksonville westward into the Big Bend of Florida, were reporting exceptional drought conditions as were parts of central and southwest Georgia while nearly all of Florida north of the Everglades up through the panhandle, southeast Alabama, the lower two thirds of Georgia and the southern half of South Carolina were under severe drought conditions.

After making landfall in northeast Florida, Beryl continued westward into south-central Georgia before recurving back towards the northeast and accelerating over the coastal Carolinas back out into the Atlantic. In the process, Beryl brought much needed rain to portions of the drought-stricken Southeast.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (or TRMM) satellite was launched back in November of 1997 with the primary mission of measuring rainfall from space using a combination of passive microwave and active radar sensors.

TRMM can also be used to calibrate rainfall estimates from other satellites for expanded coverage. The TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. provides estimates of rainfall over the global Tropics. TMPA rainfall totals are shown here for the southeastern United States and the surrounding region for the period May 23 to 30, 2012.

Appropriate storm symbols are overlaid showing the storm's track and intensity. The highest rainfall totals over land occur over the north-central Florida peninsula where they are upwards of 80 mm (~3 inches, shown in gold). Locally, upwards of a foot of rain was reported across portions of north Florida. Meanwhile lighter amounts (shown in light blue) extend across southeast Georgia with somewhat heavier amounts across North and South Carolina. While Beryl did not relieve the drought, it did bring at least temporary relief to areas that really needed it.

Text Credit: Steve Lang
NASA/TRMM
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



May 30, 2012
TRMM's Microwave Image (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) rainfall rates from Monday, May, 28 4:33 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
Monday, May, 28 4:33 p.m. EDT data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) revealed rainfall rates from Tropical Depression Beryl. The TRMM image shows that bands of rainfall rotating around Beryl were mainly affecting only northern Florida and southeastern Georgia. A few areas of very intense rainfall of over 50mm/hr (~2 inches) is shown (in red) in some feeder bands.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce
Rainfall rates within Tropical Depression Beryl was taken from NASA's TRMM satellite on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. › View larger image
This image of rainfall rates within Tropical Depression Beryl was taken from NASA's TRMM satellite on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 0127 UTC. Data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) were captured shown in two images from those orbits. These TRMM images show that bands of rainfall rotating around Beryl were mainly affecting only northern Florida and southeastern Georgia. A few areas of very intense rainfall of over 50mm/hr (~2 inches) is shown (in red) in some feeder bands. Blue and green indicate light to moderate rainfall falling at a rate between .78 (20 mm) and 1.57 inches (40 mm) per hour.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce
Tropical Depression Beryl Drenches Florida, Georgia, North Carolina

At times Tropical Storm Beryl has been producing intense rainfall over the southeastern United States since coming ashore early on Monday May 28, 2012. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite can measure rainfall from space and has been keeping tabs on Beryl's rainfall, now drenching North Carolina and southeastern Virginia.

The TRMM satellite had good views of Beryl's rainfall on Monday, May 28, 2012 at 2033 UTC (4:33 p.m. EDT) and on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 0127 UTC (Monday, May, 28 at 9:27 p.m. EDT). Data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) were captured shown in two images from those orbits. These TRMM images show that bands of rainfall rotating around Beryl were mainly affecting only northern Florida and southeastern Georgia. A few areas of very intense rainfall of over 50mm/hr (~2 inches) is shown in some feeder bands.

On Wednesday, May 30 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Beryl was still bringing rain to the southeastern U.S. Beryl is moving a lot faster than it was, and now moving northeast toward the Atlantic coast near 20 mph (32 kph). Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph (55 kph) with higher gusts. Beryl is centered about 5 miles (10 km) west of Wilmington, N.C., near 34.2 North and 78.0 West.

Although the winds have weakened, conditions along the coast are still dangerous. Large waves and rip currents are possible along the coast of North Carolina throughout May 30-31. Beryl is also expected to bring between 2 to 4 inches of rain, with some isolated higher amounts to areas of eastern North Carolina and extreme southeastern Virginia.

The National Hurricane Center expects Beryl to move off the North Carolina coast this evening and lose its tropical characteristics.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





















May 29, 2012
GOES-13 animation of Tropical Storm Beryl over the Memorial Day U.S. holiday weekend from May 26-28. › View GOES-13 animation
This animation of NOAA GOES-13 satellite imagery shows the development and progression of Tropical Storm Beryl over the Memorial Day U.S. holiday weekend from May 26-28. It was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. Tropical Storm Beryl formed from System 94L off the South Carolina coast and made landfall near Jacksonville, Fla. on May 28 at 12:10 a.m. EDT with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
This visible image of Tropical Depression Beryl was taken by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Depression Beryl was taken by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project. At the time of the image, Beryl's center was within 10 miles of Valdosta, Georgia and was crawling to the north.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
TRMM was capturing rainfall data on Beryl over the holiday weekend, and saw light to moderate rainfall. › View larger image
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was capturing rainfall data on Beryl over the holiday weekend, and on May 28 at 2033 UTC (4:33 p.m. EDT) saw light to moderate rainfall throughout the system with some areas west of the center dropping heavy rain.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce
This visible image of Beryl was captured using the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on May 28, 2012 › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Depression Beryl was captured using the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on May 28, 2012 at 16:05 UTC (12:05 p.m. EDT) when it was centered over northern Florida.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Watches Progression of Tropical Depression Beryl

Tropical Storm Beryl formed off the Carolina coast on Friday, May 25 as "System 94L" and later that day became the second tropical storm of the Atlantic Hurricane Season, before the season even started. Over the Memorial Day holiday weekend in the U.S. NASA and NOAA satellites kept track of Beryl, feeding forecasters with valuable data.

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites and NOAA's GOES-13 satellite have been monitoring the progression of Beryl and continue to provide visible, infrared, rainfall, temperature, and other data to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center, in Miami, Fla.

An animation of satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite was created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. that shows the birth, landfall and progression of Beryl from May 26 through May 28, 2012.

On May 26 at 1615 UTC (12:15 p.m. EDT), NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Beryl when it was still off the U.S. East coast. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies onboard Terra captured a visible image of the storm that showed its circulation center. To see the image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Beryl.A2012147.1615.1km.jpg.

Later on May 27 at 1835 UTC (2:35 p.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Beryl and the MODIS instrument on that satellite, like the one on NASA's Terra satellite, captured an image of Beryl over northern Florida. To see that image, visit: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/single.cgi?image=Beryl.A2012148.1835.2km.jpg. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was capturing rainfall data on Beryl over the holiday weekend, and on May 27 saw light to moderate rainfall throughout the system with some areas west of the center dropping heavy rain. To see the TRMM image, visit: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/images_dir/beryl_27may2012_2130_utc_vis-rain_blend.mpg

Beryl made landfall near Jacksonville, Florida at 0410 UTC (12:10 a.m. EDT on Monday, May 28). After making landfall, Beryl's winds dropped to 50 mph (85 kph), down from 70 mph. At 7 a.m. on May 28, Beryl's center was 20 miles (30 km) west of Jacksonville, Fla., and just 85 miles (135 km) east-southeast of Valdosta, Georgia. Beryl continued to move west at 8 mph (13 kph), and had a minimum central pressure of 997 millibars.

Northern Florida, eastern Georgia and coastal South Carolina have all been experiencing drought conditions, so Beryl's rainfall is actually helpful. On Tuesday, May 29, the National Hurricane Center forecast indicated that "Beryl is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 5 to 10 inches, with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches in Northern Florida and southeastern Georgia. Beryl is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 3 to 6 inches in eastern South Carolina and eastern North Carolina."

On Tuesday, May 29 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Beryl was a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 30 mph (45 kph). Beryl's center was located just 10 miles from Valdosta, Georgia, near 30.9 North and 83.4 West. Valdosta is famous for being the boyhood home of Dr. John Holliday, the dentist that fought alongside Wyatt Earp in the shootout near the O.K. Corral in Oct. 1881 in Tombstone, Ariz.

Beryl is crawling to the north at 2 mph (4 kph) and is expected to turn to the northeast and speed up as it heads toward the Atlantic coast.

As Beryl continues its slow trek back to its Atlantic Ocean birthplace, it continues to generate dangerous surf conditions from South Carolina to northern Florida, with rip currents and heavy surf.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect Beryl to be close to the coast of South Carolina by early Wednesday morning, May 30, and back into the Atlantic Ocean later on that day. Once Beryl moves closer to the warm waters of the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic, it is expected to strengthen and may once again become a tropical storm.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.












May 25, 2012

satellite image of system 94L derived from satellite data › Larger image
Another instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a stunning view of Typhoon Sanvu that clearly showed an eye. The image was taken on May 25 at 0355 UTC from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard Aqua.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce)
Satellite Data Indicate Developing Tropical Cyclone Off the Carolina Coast

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) Miami, Florida assigned an area in the northwestern Bahamas a 80% probability of becoming a tropical cyclone over the coming weekend. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over the low pressure area and provided rainfall data to forecasters.

The TRMM satellite passed over the low pressure area designated as System 94L on May 25 at 0153 UTC (9:53 p.m. EDT, May 24) and at 0331 UTC (11:31 p.m. EDT May 24). A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments shows that showers are wrapped around the north side of the low pressure area, and heavy rain has been falling in Cuba and the Bahamas for the last 24 hours.

System 94L is a broad area of low pressure, located 275 miles southeast of the coast of the Carolinas. If the low develops over the weekend it would be named tropical storm Beryl. The low is generating strong showers and thunderstorms across central Cuba and the northwestern and central Bahamas.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that central Cuba has received between 6 to 20 inches or rainfall, creating floods and mudslides, and rain continues. Freeport, Bahamas reported a 24-hour total of 9.7 inches. The gives System 94L a high chance for becoming a tropical cyclone this weekend when conditions will be better for further development. Coastal interests from the Carolinas southward through northeastern Florida should monitor the progress of this system over the Memorial Day weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.