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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Storm Debby (Atlantic Ocean/Caribbean Sea)
06.25.12
 
System 96L became Tropical Storm Debby on June 23 as she continued to organize and strengthen. › Vew larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Debby when she became a tropical storm on June 23 as she continued to organize and strengthen. Infrared data from the AIRS instrument onboard, indicated the bulk of showers and thunderstorms stretched from the north to the east and southern quadrants.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Debby

Tropical Storm Debby formed from the low pressure area called System 96L, that NASA satellites were studying last week. NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the storm right after it strengthened into a tropical storm on June 23.

Debby was born Saturday, June 23 around 4 a.m. EDT as her maximum sustained winds whipped up to 50 mph very quickly. She was born about 220 miles (355 km) south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, near 26.2 North and 87.6 West. Debby was moving to the north at 6 mph (9 kmh).

In an infrared image taken on June 23 from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, the bulk of showers and thunderstorms (heaviest rainfall and strongest t-storms) were seen north, east and south of the center of circulation. That triggered heavy rainfall, flash flooding and isolated tornadoes in Florida this weekend.

By the next day, Sunday June 24 at 8 a.m. EDT, Debby's maximum sustained winds were near 60 MPH (95 kmh), and Debby was located about 170 miles (270 km) southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. That's about 195 miles southwest of Apalachicola, Fla. Debby slowed to a crawl in a northerly direction at 2 mph (4 kmh).

By early Monday, June 25, Debby was almost stationary in the Gulf of Mexico bringing heavy rain, storm surge, tropical-storm-force winds to several Gulf states. Watches and warnings on June 25 include: A tropical storm warning for east of the Alabama-Florida border eastward to the Suwannee River, Florida. A tropical storm watch is also in effect for south of the Suwannee River to Englewood Florida.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 22, 2012
This visible image of System 96L was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 22 › View larger image
This visible image of System 96L was captured by NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on June 22 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA GOES Project
NASA Sees Tropical Trouble Brewing in Southern Gulf of Mexico

Imagery from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite has shown some towering thunderstorms within the low pressure area called System 96L, located in the southern Gulf of Mexico. NASA continues to create the imagery from the GOES satellite and NASA satellites are also monitoring the developing low. If it does organize further and become a tropical storm over the weekend, it would be named "Debby."

Its quite likely that the fourth tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Hurricane Season is brewing in the southern Gulf of Mexico, more specifically, in the Yucatan Channel. The Yucatan Channel lies between Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and western Cuba.

Tropical depressions seem have have a habit of forming on weekends, and this low appears to be following that habit. On Friday, June 22 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), System 96L was located near 22.5 North and 89.5 West, near the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula.

The GOES-13 satellite continually monitors the eastern U.S. and provides updated visible and infrared imagery. An image from June 22 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) shows a large low pressure area near the Yucatan's northern coast with disorganized showers and thunderstorms. In the image, some of the thunderstorms near the center of the low appear to be higher than the surrounding clouds,which indicates they are higher and stronger.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that atmospheric pressure on the surface continues to fall, indicating that the low pressure area is intensifying. Forecasters at NHC give System 96L a 70 percent chance of becoming the fourth tropical depression of the Atlantic Hurricane season, sometime over the weekend.

Meanwhile, System 96L is expected to move slowly northward into the Gulf of Mexico this weekend (June 23-24). The NHC notes "Interests along the entire United States Gulf Coast should monitor the progress of this disturbance through the weekend. Heavy rains and localized flooding are possible across the Yucatan peninsula, western Cuba, and southern Florida through Saturday."

For NASA updates over the weekend, visit NASA's Hurricane Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/NASAs-Hurricane-Web-Page/112998395413629 or NASA Hurricane's Twitter page:http://twitter.com/NASAHurricane.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 21, 2012
AIRS captured this infrared image of a low in the southern Gulf of Mexico on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured this infrared image of a low in the southern Gulf of Mexico on June 21 at 3:29 a.m. EDT. The strongest thunderstorms (purple) have high, cold cloud tops (of -63F/-52C)located southwest and southeast of the center.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Eyeing Southern Gulf of Mexico Low for Tropical Trouble

NASA satellites are providing data on a broad area of low pressure in the south-central Gulf of Mexico that has a medium chance for development into a tropical depression.

Infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite is helping forecasters at the National Hurricane Center understand what's happening with the low pressure area. In an image captured on June 21 at 0729 (3:29 a.m. EDT), the center of the low pressure area appears to be near the western tip of Cuba near 22 North and 85 West. The strongest thunderstorms and convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms) have high, cold cloud tops (of -63F/-52C) that indicate strong uplift, southwest and southeast of the center.

The National Hurricane Center noted that the large area of clouds, showers and thunderstorms extend from the northwestern Caribbean Sea north into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico and over Florida.

There are currently strong upper level winds that have been inhibiting development, but those winds are expected to weaken, giving the low more of a chance to get organized. The low continues to move north into the Gulf of Mexico bringning heavy rainfall and possible flooding over Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, western Cuba and southern Florida over the next couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.