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Hurricane Season 2012: System 90E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
07.26.12
 
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a visible image of System 90E at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) on July 26, 2012 › View larger image
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a visible image of System 90E at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) on July 26, 2012 and it was difficult to pick out a center of circulation.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
System 90E's Showers, Clouds Appear More Disorganized on Satellite Imagery

Once a promising tropical cyclone, now a low pressure area with a minimal chance of seeing tropical formation. System 90E appears disorganized on imagery from NOAA GOES-15 satellite today.

Adverse atmospheric conditions are responsible for the low pressure system's chances down to just a 20 percent chance. The National Hurricane Center noted that some slow development is possible as it continues moving in a westerly direction.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a visible image of System 90E at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) and it was again a challenge to pick out a center of circulation. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. System 90E is now located about 1,5000 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California and continues moving west-northwest between 10 and 15 mph.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 25, 2012

GOES-15 captured a visible image of System 90E at 1500 UTC and it was difficult to pick out a center of circulation. › View larger image
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a visible image of System 90E at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) and it was difficult to pick out a center of circulation.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Satellite Sees System 90E's Strength Sapped

System 90E's strength has been sapped due to atmospheric conditions, and it appears more disorganized on satellite imagery today.

Earlier this week, System 90E had a high chance for developing into a tropical cyclone. Atmospheric conditions changed and dropped the low pressure system's chances down to just a 20 percent chance today, July 25, 2012.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a visible image of System 90E at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) and it was difficult to pick out a center of circulation. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. t that time, System 90E was located about 1,300 miles west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 10.8 North and 121.4 West. It continued to move on a westerly track.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 24, 2012

image of system 90E derived from satellite data &rsaquoView larger image
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 90E on 5:53 a.m. EDT/2:53 a.m. PDT, the AIRS instrument took an infrared "snapshot" of it. The bulk of the showers and thunderstorms (purple) in the low pressure area appear to be west and south of the center on the AIRS image.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
System 90E Appears Slightly Less Organized on NASA Infrared Imagery

Infrared imagery of the low pressure area known as "System 90E" in the eastern Pacific Ocean revealed the system was not as organized today as it was yesterday.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 90E on July 24 at 0953 UTC (5:53 a.m. EDT/2:53 a.m. PDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument took an infrared "snapshot" of it. The bulk of the showers and thunderstorms in the low pressure area appear to be west and south of the center on the AIRS image. However, the eastern side of the storm was out of the range of AIRS' sight, so there is no data for the cloud temperatures on that side of the storm.

The AIRS imagery did show that the cloud top temperatures in the western and southern sides were as cold as -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating high thunderstorms reaching into the top of the troposphere. Those thunderstorms likely contain heavy rainfall.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/8 a.m. PDT) on July 24, System 90E was located about 975 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, near 9.9 North latitude and 116.6 West longitude. It continued to move west.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that "Environmental conditions remain marginally conducive for a tropical depression to form during the next couple of days." NHC noted that System 90E has a 70 percent or high chance of developing into a tropical depression in the next two days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 23, 2012

System 90E was captured by the GOES-15 satellite on July 23, 2012 at 11 a.m. EDT. › View larger image
This visible image of System 90E was captured by the GOES-15 satellite on July 23, 2012 at 11 a.m. EDT. It shows that the low pressure area has become more organized over the last day, and may become a tropical depression.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
Satellite Sees Eastern Pacific Tropical Cyclone Organizing

The low pressure system called "System 90E" in the eastern Pacific Ocean has become more organized and its circulation is now evident in imagery from the GOES-15 satellite.

NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-15 keeps a continuous eye on the western U.S. and eastern Pacific Ocean, and satellite data from July 23 shows the clouds in System 90E have better rotation from the previous day. The GOES imagery was created at NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. System 90E also appears to have a "tail" in the GOES image.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted today that System 90E is located about 775 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, and it continues to show signs of organization. Environmental conditions are favorable for tropical cyclone formation, with light wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures over 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26.6 Celsius).

The NHC gives System 90E a 90 percent chance of becoming Tropical Depression number 7E in the next two days as it moves to the west-northwest. If it strengthens into a tropical storm later, it would be called Gilma.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.