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Hurricane Season 2012: Tropical Depression 1W (Western North Pacific Ocean)
02.21.12
 
AIRS infrared image of Tropical Depression 1W on Feb. 17, 2012 at 1753 UTC (12:53 p.m. EST). › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression 1W on Feb. 17, 2012 at 1753 UTC (12:53 p.m. EST). The storm appeared to be breaking apart. The strongest convection and thunderstorms appeared in purple over the South China Sea.
Credit: NASA/NRL
NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Depression 1W Fall Apart in South China Sea

Infrared satellite data from NASA's AIRS instrument showed Tropical Depression 1W was falling apart in the South China Sea on February 17 and it didn't hold together over the weekend of the 18 and 19.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 1W on Feb. 17, 2012 at 1753 UTC (12:53 p.m. EST). The storm appeared to be breaking apart in the South China Sea. The strongest convection and thunderstorms appeared to be fragmented around its center.

By Tuesday, February 22, 2012, Tropical Depression 1W was no longer suspect for tropical development, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). It was about 315 nautical miles east-southeast of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, near 8.8 North latitude and 111.6 East longitude. The JTWC noted that the depression had dissipated later during the early hours on February 22.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Feb. 17, 2012

NASA AIRS instrument data revealed on Feb. 17 at 0541 UTC, that Tropical Depression 1W has a rapidly consolidating low pressure center, and bands of thunderstorms are wrapping into the center › View larger image
NASA AIRS instrument data revealed on Feb. 17 at 0541 UTC, that Tropical Depression 1W has a rapidly consolidating low pressure center, and bands of thunderstorms are wrapping into the center.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees First Tropical Depression of Northwestern Pacific Threatening Vietnam

The first tropical cyclone of the northwestern Pacific Ocean hurricane season has formed and is threatening southern Vietnam. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 1W (TD1W) that showed the storm organized quickly.

Tropical Depression 1W intensified rapidly on February 17, as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared data on TS1W's cloud top temperatures at 05:41 UTC (12:41 a.m. EST) and saw some high, cold cloud tops colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52.7C) indicating strong storms. AIRS data revealed a rapidly consolidating low pressure center, and showed bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on February 17, 2012, TD1W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (~29 mph/46.3 kph). It was located about 420 nautical miles (483.3 miles/777.8 km) east of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, near 9.7 North and 113.4 East. It was moving west at 17 knots (19.5 mph/31.4 kph). Because of moderate vertical wind shear from the northeast, TD1W will struggle to strengthen.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast calls for TD1W to take an west-northwest track and make landfall in southeast Vietnam after 1200 UTC (7 a.m. EST) on February 19, somewhere between Ho Chi Minh City and Nha Trang to the north. Interests in southern Vietnam should monitor the progress of TD1W over the next couple of days to check on the latest forecast track and prepare for gusty winds and heavy rainfall.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.