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Hurricane Season 2011: Vince (Southern Indian Ocean)
01.18.11
 
January 18, 2011

NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Vince Fade With a Little Heavy Rain TRMM captured the rainfall rates of Tropical Storm Vince on January 17 › View larger image
TRMM captured the rainfall rates of Tropical Storm Vince on January 17 at 0616 UTC (1:16 a.m. EST). The rainfall is all to the southeast of the storm's center indicating wind shear from the northwest. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour. The very small red areas are heavy rainfall at almost 2 inches per hour. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM satellite observed Tropical Storm Vince as strong wind shear continued to batter it yesterday, and noticed that despite Vince being downgraded below tropical storm status, there were still small areas of heavy rain in the storm.

On Sunday, January 16, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their last advisory on Tropical Cyclone Vince. Vince was about 370 nautical miles north of Learmonth, Australia. On Sunday, Vince's maximum sustained winds were near 34 mph and weakening.

At that time, satellite data showed that convection (the showers and thunderstorms associated with the system) has de-coupled from the low level circulation center indicating that strong wind shear was taking its toll on the tropical cyclone and tearing it apart.

When NASA and the Japanese Space Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Storm Vince the next day it captured rainfall rates occurring in the storm. TRMM captured those rainfall rates at 0616 UTC (1:16 a.m. EST). The TRMM imagery showed that the bulk of rainfall was all to the southeast of the storm's center indicating strong wind shear from the northwest.

Most of the rainfall occurring in Vince was moderate, falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour. There were, however, some small areas of heavy rainfall, falling at almost 2 inches per hour.

TRMM images are made at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. At Goddard, rain rates in the center of the swath (the satellite's orbit path over the storm) are created from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The TRMM PR is the only space borne radar of its kind. The rain rates in the outer portion of the storm are created from a different instrument on the satellite, called the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are then overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). For more information about TRMM, visit: http://www.trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center does not expect Vince's remnants to regenerate.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD

January 14, 2011

NASA's Aqua Sees Tropical Storm Vince About to U-Turn Away from Australia

MODIS captured a visible image that shows the bulk of the thunderstorms southwest of Vince's center. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Vince on January 14 at 06:20 UTC (1:20 a.m. EST/2:20 p.m. Australia/Perth) and the MODIS instrument captured a visible image that shows the bulk of the thunderstorms southwest of Vince's center because of wind shear.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
TRMM precipitation data showed that an area of very powerful thunderstorms had developed within VINCE. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite passed directly over tropical cyclone VINCE in the South Indian Ocean west-northwest of Australia on January 14, 2011 at 1537 UTC. Precipitation data derived from TRMM's Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments showed that an area of very powerful thunderstorms had developed within VINCE. Rainfall at the surface was very intense with rain rates over 50 mm/hr ( ~2 inches) in some of these thunderstorms.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
This 3-D image of Tropical Storm Vince was made from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data. › View larger image
This 3-D image of Tropical Storm Vince was made from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data and shows that some of these powerful storms reached to heights of over 17km (~10.6 miles). The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is managed by NASA and JAXA.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Building high pressure is expected to make Tropical Storm Vince do a U-turn in the Southern Indian Ocean and take a westward track away from Western Australia. Two instruments on NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Vince's clouds this morning before Vince's forecast U-turn.

From its vantage point in space, Aqua passed over Tropical Storm Vince on January 14 at 06:20 UTC (1:20 a.m. EST/2:20 p.m. Australia/Perth time) and the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image that showed the bulk of Vince's thunderstorms southwest of the storm's center due to moderate wind shear. Another instrument on Aqua looked at the organization of thunderstorms around Vince's center.

Satellite imagery shows that the low level circulation center is now exposed to outside winds, and the strongest convection and thunderstorms are limited to the southwestern quadrant of the storm. Despite the limited strong convection, a satellite image from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) instrument that also flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, showed good organization and tightly curved bands of clouds that are wrapping into the center.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST/11:00 p.m. Australia/Perth) on Jan. 14, Tropical Storm Vince's maximum sustained winds were down to 39 mph (35 knots/63 km/hr). It was located approximately 350 nautical miles north of Learmonth, Australia, near 16.3 South and 114.6 East. It was moving eastward at 10 mph (9 knots/16 km/hr) and is expected to turn west.

Vince is currently dealing with moderate vertical wind shear (which can tear a storm apart). Winds buffering the tropical storm are blowing between 20 and 30 knots (23 mph/37 km/hr and 34 mph/55 km/hr).

A ridge (an elongated area) of high pressure that is building over Western Australia is expected to push Vince to the west and away from Australia this weekend. By Monday, Vince is forecast to move into cooler waters and weaken.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD































January 13, 2011

Tropical Storm Vince No Threat to Land

Tropical Storm Vince seen by AIRS on Jan. 12 2011 › View larger image
This NASA infrared image of Tropical Storm Vince was taken on Jan. 12 at 0629 UTC (1:29 a.m. EST) from the AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The stronger thunderstorms are around its center (purple). Western Australia is seen in the lower right corner of the image.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
At 1500 UTC on January 13, Tropical Storm Vince had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph) and was near 16.1 South and 110.6 East. That's about 435 nm north-northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Vince is moving east-southeastward at 11 knots (13 mph) and is becoming less organized. As a result of wind shear, convection has been displaced to the northwest of the center of circulation.

Vince is no currently no threat to land and is forecast to move in an easterly direction for a couple of days before turning back to the west.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD










January 12, 2011

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Quick Formation of Tropical Storm Vince

Image of Tropical Storm Vince taken by AIRS on Jan. 12, 2011; the stronger thunderstorms are around its center (purple). › View larger image
This NASA infrared image of Tropical Storm Vince was taken on Jan. 12 at 0629 UTC (1:29 a.m. EST) from the AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The stronger thunderstorms are around its center (purple). Western Australia is seen in the lower right corner of the image.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Vince was a low pressure are in the Southern Indian Ocean yesterday and today has blown up into a tropical storm. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Vince and captured some strong thunderstorms surrounding its center, reinforcing its quick intensification.

Vince developed quickly from a low pressure area into the sixth tropical depression in the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season.

When the Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Vince on Jan. 12 at 0629 UTC (1:29 a.m. EST), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of its cloudtops and revealed some very cold, high thunderstorm cloud-tops. The image showed a circular area of high, strong thunderstorms around the center of Vince's circulation. Those highest, strongest thunderstorms have cloud top temperatures as cold as or colder than 220 Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on Jan. 12, Tropical Storm Vince had maximum sustained winds near 46 mph (74 km/hr). It was about 540 miles northwest of Learmonth, Western Australia, near 15.1 South and 108.3 East. Vince was moving east-southeast near 8 mph (12 km/hr). Vince is creating waves as high as 16 feet (~5 meters).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Vince to continue intensifying and curve away to the west over the next couple of days without affecting mainland Australia.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD