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Hurricane Season 2011: Typhoon Nanmadol (Western North Pacific Ocean)
09.02.11
 
This TRMM rainmap shows rainfall between Aug. 20-31 that included Nanmadol's rainfall.› View larger image
This rainmap created at NASA used TRMM satellite data. It showed rainfall between Aug. 20-31 that included Nanmadol's rainfall. Some parts of northern Luzon, Phillippines received as much as 450 millimeters (almost 5 inches) of rainfall. The rainmap showed that a lot of heavy rainfall also fell over the waters of the Philippine Sea, east of Luzon. Credit: NASA Giovanni
NASA Maps Flooding Rainfall in the Philippines from Tropical Storm Nanmadol

Tropical Storm Nanmadol produced a lot of rain as it passed over Luzon, Phillippines before it made final landfall on the southeastern China coastline this weekend. Data from a NASA satellite combined with a web-based application helped create a rainfall map to determine where the heaviest precipitation fell in Luzon.

After Nanmadol left the Philippines, it brought flooding and devastation to China. Xinahunet News reported Tropical storm Nanmadol caused more than 44 million yuan or 6.9 million U.S. dollars in damages in China's southeastern coast when it made landfall this week. Over 100 houses were destroyed and another 600 damaged from Nanmadol. The storm moved along the coast of the Fujian Province, bringing tropical-storm force winds and very heavy rainfall.

A rainfall map showing precipitation from August 20 to August 31, 2011 was created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Project Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA ).

Some parts of northern Luzon, Philippines received as much as 450 millimeters (almost 5 inches) of rainfall. The rainmap showed that a lot of heavy rainfall also fell over the waters of the Philippine Sea, east of Luzon. At that time, Nanmadol's northern edge was already reaching southern Taiwan.

The image was created using the interactive Giovanni application. Giovanni is a Web-based application developed by the GES DISC that provides a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access vast amounts of Earth science remote sensing data without having to download the data.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 31, 2011

AIRS infrared image captured on Aug. 31 at 1:05 EDT, shows Nanmadol was dissipating quickly over mainland China › View larger image
AIRS infrared image captured on Aug. 31 at 1:05 EDT, shows Nanmadol was dissipating quickly over mainland China with the lack of high, thunderstorm clouds (blue). Most of the remnants of Nanmadol are lower, warmer clouds (green).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Nanmadol's Landfall, Talas Headed to Japan

Tropical Storm Nanmadol made landfall in southeastern China's Fujian Province and is now a depression, while further east, Tropical Storm Talas is still headed for Japan.

Infrared satellite imagery from The Atmospheric Sounder Instrument (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite shows two different stories in the tropical cyclones.

AIRS captured an infrared image of Nanmadol on Aug. 31 at 1:05 EDT dissipating quickly over mainland China with a lack of high, thunderstorm clouds. Most of the remnants of Nanmadol are lower, warmer clouds.

Tropical Storm Nanmadol made landfall about 2.00 a.m. local time on Aug. 31 (2 p.m. EDT on Aug. 30), in Jinjiang city, located in the Fujian Province, (southeastern) China. Nanmadol was a tropical storm at the time of landfall with sustained winds reported near 44 mph (72 kmh). By 8 a.m. local time/China on August 31 (August 30 at 8 p.m. EDT), Nanmadol's maximum sustained winds dropped down to 25 knots (29 mph/46 kmh), and it continued to move inland at 4 knots (5 mph/7 kmh). It was located near 24.9 North and 118.7 East. It is expected to dissipate later today or tomorrow.

Agence France-Press reported that Nanmadol destroyed hundreds of homes in Taiwan earlier this week.

AIRS infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Talas late on Aug. 30 (11:29 p.m. EDT) showed the large eastern half contained strong, high, thunderstorm clouds around the center where cloud top temperatures exceed -63F (-52C).

Today, Tropical Storm Talas is still working toward a landfall. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts a landfall in southern Japan on September 2. Talas still had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63 mph/103 kmh), as it did yesterday.

It was located about 465 miles (748 km) south of Kyoto, Japan, near 27.3 North and 136.8 East. It was moving to the northwest at 5 knots (6 mph/XXX). Talas is still a large storm with tropical storm-force winds extending out 210 miles, making it at least 420 miles (675 km) in diameter. Talas continues to intensify as it moves northward. Talas is expected to make landfall Friday and then become extra-tropical after crossing Japan and moving into the Sea of Japan.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 30, 2011

AIRS image of Nanmadol from Aug. 30, 2011 › View larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Nanmadol's cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 29 at 1:29 p.m. EDT. The western edge of the storm is already over mainland China. Strong thunderstorms with high, cold cloud tops appear in purple. Those areas are likely experiencing heavy rainfall. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
AIRS image of Talas on Aug. 30, 2011 › View larger image
This infrared image of the western half of Tropical Storm Talas' cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 30 at 1:23 a.m. EDT on its approach to Japan. Talas' eye is surrounded by bands of strong thunderstorms (purple). Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Western Pacific Tropical Storm Talas Twice as Large as Nanmadol

Tropical Storm Nanmadol is headed for landfall in China later today while Tropical Storm Talas is still days away from affecting Japan. NASA's Aqua satellite infrared imagery continues to show that Talas is much more organized than Nanmadol and twice Nanmadol's size.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over both storms on August 30 and obtained cloud-top temperature readings of both tropical storms. Colder cloud top temperatures are more abundant in Tropical Storm Talas as it is a stronger storm, and not facing the adverse winds against Nanmadol. The wind shear battering Nanmadol is preventing convection from forming more powerful, high thunderstorms (with colder cloud temperatures).

Tropical Storm Nanmadol's maximum sustained winds are now near 35 knots and it is being battered by wind shear as it moves west across the Strait of Taiwan. The storm is about 170 miles wide as tropical storm-force winds extend 85 miles from the center. Nanmadol is forecast to make landfall in mainland China later today, August 30. At 11 a.m. EDT it was 140 miles west of Taipei, Taiwan near 24.7 North and 119.0 East.

Further east, NASA's Aqua satellite saw some impressive banding of thunderstorms around Tropical Storm Talas' center of circulation, particularly to the south. That's evident in the forecast from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, where meteorologists expect the storm to strengthen slowly.

Talas appears to be double the size of nearby Tropical Storm Nanmadol, Talas measures about 340 miles in diameter, versus Nanmadol's 170 miles. Talas' maximum sustained winds are around 55 knots and it is moving to the north-northwest at 7 knots. Talas is currently about 560 miles south of Toyko, Japan. Talas is expected to pass over mainland Japan then become extra-tropical.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.









August 29, 2011

his infrared image of Tropical Storm Nanmadol's cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 29 at 1:17 a.m. EDT. This infrared image of Tropical Storm Nanmadol's cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 29 at 1:17 a.m. EDT. The western edge of the storm is already over mainland China, and the eastern edges are over Taiwan (north) and Luzon, Philippines (south). Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Talas cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 28 at 11:35 p.m. EDT. This infrared image of Tropical Storm Talas cold clouds was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 28 at 11:35 p.m. EDT. Talas appears to have an eye with good circulation surrounded by bands of strong thunderstorms (purple). Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Infrared Tracking of Two Pacific Tropical Storms: Talas and Nanmadol

Infrared images from NASA's Aqua satellite have been keeping track of two tropical storms in the western North Pacific Ocean: Talas and Nanmadol. Talas appears much more organized than Nanmadol in both circulation and bands of thunderstorms. One tropical storm is headed for a landfall in Japan and the other a landfall in China.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over both storms on August 29 and obtained cloud-top temperature readings of both tropical storms noting a difference in organization and circulation.

Tropical storm Nanmadol, also called "Mina" in the Philippines was about 125 miles southwest of Taipei, Taiwan near 23.5 North and 119.9 East today, August 29, at 5 a.m. EDT. Nanmadol had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots and was moving to the northwest near 8 knots. It is generating very rough seas, with waves as high as 23 feet.

An infrared image of Tropical Storm Nanmadol's cold clouds was taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, Aug. 29 at 1:17 a.m. EDT. Nanmadol is a large storm as evidenced in the satellite image as the western edge of the storm is already over mainland China, and the eastern edges are over Taiwan and Luzon, Philippines. There were a couple of strong bands of thunderstorms south of the center of circulation, where cloud top temperatures exceeded -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

Nanmadol provided deadly in the Philippines by killing 14 people in Northern Luzon over the weekend, according to GMA News. Public storm warning signals are still in effect today for the Batanes Islands of Luzon. Nanmadol passed over the island of Taiwan this weekend and is now in the Strait of Taiwan. It is forecast to make a final landfall in mainland China tomorrow, August 30.

Tropical Storm Talas is located further east in the western North Pacific and appears to have its sights on a landfall in Japan.

At 5 a.m. EDT, August 29, Talas had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots. Talas was 715 miles south of Tokyo, Japan near 23.8 North and 140.1 East. It was moving to the north near 2 knots and generating 33 foot high waves. Talas is forecast to intensify until it approaches Japan when atmospheric conditions will again weaken it.

The AIRS infrared image of Tropical Storm Talas on Aug. 28 at 11:35 p.m. EDT shows a more organized storm. Talas appears to have an eye with good circulation surrounded by tightly curved bands of strong thunderstorms to the north, east and south of the center. By September 2, Talas is expected to make landfall in Japan's Kanto Plain, south of Toyko.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 26, 2011

The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image on August 26 at 12:47 a.m. EDT. › View larger image
This infrared image of Super Typhoon Nanmadol's very cold cloud top temperatures point to where the strongest storms are (purple) within Nanmadol. The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image on August 26 at 12:47 a.m. EDT. The cloud mass at the eastern edge of the image is the western half of Tropical Storm Talas, a Category One Typhoon which is very large in extent.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
MODIS image of Super Typhoon Nanmadol captured at 4:50 UTC (12:50 a.m. EDT)  on August 26, 2011. › View larger image
This visible image of Super Typhoon Nanmadol over the Philippines was captured at 4:50 UTC (12:50 a.m. EDT) on August 26, 2011 from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. The eye was visible at this time.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
NASA Sees Super Typhoon Namadol Explode in Strength, Talas Also Strengthens

Within 24 hours Tropical Storm Nanmadol contracted and organized quickly, exploding into a Category Four Typhoon as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.

NASA's Aqua satellite provided two different perspectives of this supertyphoon: a visible and an infrared. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Super Typhoon Nanmadol over the Philippines at 12:50 a.m. EDT (4:50 UTC).

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is the instrument on Aqua that took an infrared image of Nanmadol's and nearby Tropical Storm Talas' cloud top temperatures on August 26 at 12:47 a.m. EDT. AIRS infrared image revealed that the super typhoon has highly symmetrical bands of thunderstorms wrapping tightly into its eye. Nanmadol has an eye that is 18 nautical miles (21 miles/33 km) in diameter. Tropical Storm Talas, located to the northeast of Nanmadol.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on August 26, Super Typhoon Nanmadol's maximum sustained winds were near 135 knots (155 mph/250 kmh) with higher gusts making it the top end of the Category four typhoon status. Category five typhoons have sustained wind speeds of greater than 155 mph (135 knots).

Nanmadol was about 585 nautical miles (673 miles/1083 km) south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Japan and northeast of Luzon, Philippines where it was dropping heavy rainfall. Nanmadol is moving to the north-northwest at 6 knots and is generating dangerous surf with wave heights reaching 32 feet (.7 meters)!

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expect Nanmadol to intensify further into a Category Five Typhoon then gradually weaken. Nanmadol is expected to continue skirting Luzon, passing it on August 27, then passing to the east of Taiwan on August 28 and 29. Taiwan can also expect very rough seas, gusty winds and heavy downpours as Nanmadol passes by and heads to the northwest next week.

At the same time, and much farther to the northeast, Tropical Storm Talas had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph/83 kmh). It was located about 185 nautical miles (212 miles/ 342 km) south-southwest of the island of Iwo Two, Japan near 22.3 North and 139.8 East. It was moving to the north-northwest near 6 knots (7 mph/11 kmh) and also generating rough seas, 22 feet high (6.7 meters). The AIRS infrared data showed bands of strong convection wrapping around the northeastern edge of the center, indicating strengthening.

The JTWC forecast calls for Talas to steadily intensify over the weekend because of warm sea surface temperatures and favorable upper level atmospheric conditions. Talas is expected to take a more northerly track and pass just to the west of Iwo To over the weekend, and past Chichi Jima on Monday, August 29.

It is going to be a busy weekend in the western North Pacific Ocean with strengthening Super Typhoon Nanmadol and a strengthening Tropical Storm Talas.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 25, 2011

Infrared image of Tropical Storm Nanmadol taken by AIRS  on August 24 at 1:11 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows Tropical storm Nanmadol's coldest cloud tops and strongest thunderstorms (purple) on August 24 at 1:11 p.m. EDT. The typhoon appeared as a comma shape, which is the signature shape for a mature tropical cyclone.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Nanmadol Takes on Signature Typhoon Shape in NASA Infrared Image

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the newly intensified Tropical Storm Nanmadol, formerly Tropical Depression 14W.

Typhoon Nanmadol developed the signature comma shape in infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite.

When Aqua flew over Nanmadol on August 24 at 17.11 UTC (1:11 p.m. EDT), the typhoon appeared as a comma shape, which is the signature shape for a mature tropical cyclone. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that captured that image showed a large area of strong convection around the storm's eye from the east wrapping to the south and west. Nanmadol had become more compact and symmetrical than it was just 24 hours before.

On August 24, the western fringes of those strong thunderstorms were skirting the coast of Luzon, Philippines. Cloud top temperatures exceeded -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) indicating the storms were capable of heavy rainfall.

By 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on August 25, Nanmadol had moved more to the west-northwest from its previous position. It was not located about 620 nautical miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, near 16.6 North and 124.6 East. Nanmadol's maximum sustained winds had increased to 90 knots (103 mph/166 kmh). Nanmadol is forecast to head north past Luzon this weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 24, 2011

AIRS infrared image showing Tropical storm Nanmadol on August 24 at 04:59 UTC (12:50 p.m. EDT). › View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows Tropical storm Nanmadol on August 24 at 04:59 UTC (12:50 p.m. EDT). The area of strong thunderstorms has grown significantly since August 23 and appear in purple, blue indicates weaker thunderstorms with warmer cloud top temperatures. The Philippines are seen to the left.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Image Shows Larger Area of Strength in Tropical Storm Nanmadol

NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the newly intensified Tropical Storm Nanmadol, formerly Tropical Depression 14W.

Infrared imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on August 24 at 04:59 UTC (12:50 p.m. EDT) revealed that area of strong thunderstorms in Tropical storm Nanmadol has grown significantly since August 23. The cloud top temperatures have cooled, and are colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) indicating strengthening in uplift and power behind the tropical cyclone. Bands of thunderstorms have improved around the storm, and infrared imagery indicates that Nanmadol has consolidated between 11 p.m. (EDT) on August 23 and 11 a.m. (EDT) on August 24.

On August 24 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Maximum sustained winds were near 60 knots Nanmadol is located about 625 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa, near 16.1 North and 126.5 East. It has tracked west-southwestward at 2 knots (3 mph) and appears to be slowing to being almost stationary.

Nanmadol's center is still far to the east of the Philippines, however the westernmost clouds have spread over Luzon as the storm meanders in the Philippine Sea. Nanmadol is expected to change direction and begin moving to the north-northwest and away from Luzon on August 25.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 23, 2011

AIRS infrared image showing Tropical Depression 14W on August 22 at 17:23 UTC (1:23 p.m. EDT). › View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows Tropical Depression 14W on August 22 at 17:23 UTC (1:23 p.m. EDT). Isolated strong thunderstorms appear in purple, blue indicates weaker thunderstorms with warmer cloud top temperatures. Bands of thunderstorms have developed from the north to the southeastern quadrants.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Fourteenth Western Pacific Tropical Depression Has Banding Thunderstorms in NASA Image

The fourteenth tropical depression of the Western North Pacific Ocean season has officially formed and NASA infrared satellite imagery has shown organization in the system through bands of thunderstorms.

Tropical Depression 14W (TD14W) formed today from a low pressure area formerly known as System 96W. It is located over open waters of the Philippine Sea, far to the east of Luzon, Philippines. The good news for residents of Luzon is that TD14W is moving north and away from the country.

When thunderstorms appear in bands around the low-level center of a tropical depression, it is a sign that the storm is developing a good circulation. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 14W on August 22 at 17:23 UTC (1:23 p.m. EDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) saw bands of thunderstorms from the north quadrant around to the southeastern side of the storm. AIRS detected some of the thunderstorms in those bands were strong, particularly the ones closest to the depression's center. Cloud top temperatures in the strongest storms topped -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) indicating strong uplift, strong thunderstorms, and heavy rainfall. Fortunately, the storm's center was east of the Philippines.

On August 22 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), TD14W's maximum sustained winds were approaching 34 knots (39 mph), which puts it on the verge of tropical storm status (Tropical storm force begins at 39 mph). It was located about 635 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 16.1 North and 127.4 East. TD14W was moving to the north near 5 knots (6 mph) and is expected to start curving to the north-northeast over the next day.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center calls for TD14W to reach tropical storm status and continue tracking on a northeasterly direction, remaining far to the south of Kadena Air Base.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.