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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Meari (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
06.27.11
 
TRMM image of Meari from June 26, 2011› View larger image
TRMM saw Tropical Depression Meari on June 26 at 1210 UTC (8:10 a.m. EDT) as it neared landfall in North Korea. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour. There were no red areas seen from TRMM, which usually indicate heavy rainfall. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees Tropical Depression Meari About to Cross North Vietnam

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Tropical Depression Meari as it neared a landfall in southwestern North Korea on June 26. TRMM did not observe any heavy rainfall, but did see moderate rainfall with the system.

TRMM captured an image of the rainfall in Tropical Depression Meari on June 26 at 1210 UTC (8:10 a.m. EDT). Most of the rainfall was light to moderate in the system, with the heaviest rain near the center of circulation falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 and 40 mm) per hour. Satellite imagery showed that Meari had become more elongated (because of wind shear) which indicates that the storm is weakening. Between the elongation of the system and the weak convection (lighter rainfall), Meari has lost much of its energy.

On June 27 at 0000 UTC (June 26 at 8 p.m. EDT), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their last advisory on the system. At that time it was about 115 nautical miles west- Northwest of Seoul, South Korea, near 38.3 North latitude and 124.7 East longitude. It was moving to the northeast at 11 knots (13 mph/20 kmh).

The increased wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures where Meari is now located have taken the steam out of the system. It is expected to fall apart as it crosses over the rough landscape of the Hamgyeong Mountain Range. The remnants of this system may track through North Korea and enter the Sea of Japan. It will be watched for possible regeneration at that time.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 24, 2011

Most of Meari's heaviest thunderstorms (purple) were over the waters of the South China Sea › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the western half of Tropical Storm Meari on June 24 at 05:29 UTC (1:29 a.m. EDT). Meari's center was a couple of hundred miles southwest of Kadena Air Base. Most of Meari's heaviest thunderstorms (purple) were over the waters of the South China Sea and stretched west into Luzon, Philippines.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Meari Headed for North Korea Landfall

There are going to be two landfalling tropical cyclones in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean basin this weekend, Haima in Vietnam and Tropical Storm Meari in North Korea. NASA infrared satellite imagery today shows the Meari is stronger than Haima.

Tropical Storm Haima has maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kmh) making it a minimal tropical storm tracking toward Vietnam. Tropical Storm Meari is a stronger storm, with maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63 mph/101 kmh). At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on June 24 Meari's center was about 250 nautical miles southwest of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 23.9 North and 125.0 East. It was moving northwest near 12 knots (14 mph/22 kmh).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that this morning, June 24, 2011, Kadena, Futenma, and Naha Okinawa, Japan have reported sustained southeasterly winds greater than 20 knots (23 mph/37 kmh).

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the western half of Tropical Storm Meari on June 24 at 05:29 UTC (1:29 a.m. EDT) and captured an infrared image of the storm's cloud top temperatures using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. AIRS showed that most of Meari's heaviest thunderstorms were over the waters of the South China Sea and stretched west into Luzon, Philippines. The infrared image also revealed thick low-level banding of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation and the strongest convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms) was located over the northern half of Meari.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Meari to strengthen as much as 10 knots over the next day as wind shear wanes, before it increases and weakens the storm prior to landfall. It is expected to make landfall in southwestern North Korea on June 26 with sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kmh).

Coastal areas in western North and South Korea, and eastern China can expect rough surf as Tropical Storm Meari tracks through the Yellow Sea over the next two days. Southwestern North Korea and northwestern South Korea will experience heavy rainfall and possible flooding as Meari comes ashore this weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 23, 2011

AIRS captured this infrared image of Haima and Meari on June 22 at 17:53 UTC 1:53 p.m. EDT. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of 2 tropical cyclones from the AIRS instrument on June 22 at 17:53 UTC 1:53 p.m. EDT. The heaviest rainfall and strongest convection from Tropical Storm Meari (right) is currently over the Philippine Sea. The strongest thunderstorms (purple) in Haima (left) are mostly over the South China Sea and Hainan Island, China.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Gets 2 Tropical Cyclones in 1 Shot

The Northwestern Pacific Ocean is active with two tropical cyclones today, Tropical Storm Meari near the Philippines, and Tropical Depression Haima moving over China and now toward Vietnam. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region on June 22 and captured an infrared image of both storms in one image.

One of the instruments onboard NASA's Aqua satellite is the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). AIRS captures cloud top temperatures in tropical cyclones to determine the strength of convection and thunderstorms. The strongest thunderstorms have cloud tops with icy cold temperatures of -63F/-52C and are indicative of areas where rainfall rates could reach up to 2 inches / 50 mm per hour and both Meari and Haima had large areas of those very cold cloud top temperatures.

AIRS captured the image on June 22 at 17:53 UTC 1:53 p.m. EDT and it showed the heaviest rainfall and strongest convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) from Tropical Storm Meari is currently over the Philippine Sea and skirting the east coast of Luzon. The imagery showed the large area of strong thunderstorms (and convection) in Haima mostly over the South China Sea and Hainan Island, China.

Haima is still a tropical depression as its maximum sustained winds on June 23 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) were near 30 knots (34 mph/55 kmh). Tropical storms have maximum sustained winds between 38 and 73 mph. It was located over Hainan Island, China, and about 235 nautical miles west-southwest of Hong Kong, China near 21.4 North and 109.6 East. Tropical Depression Haima is moving westward at 10 knots (11 mph/19 kmh).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center does not expect Haima to strengthen into a tropical storm because of its interaction with land over Hainan Island, and its short track over the South China Sea between there and Vietnam where it is expected to make its final landfall. An orange alert in now in effect for North and South Korea as Tropical Depression Haima is tracking in that direction.

Meari is a tropical storm, and has maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/78 kmh). It is centered to the east of Luzon, the Philippines and about 500 nautical miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Japan. Meari is moving to the northwest at 12 knots (14 mph/22 kmh).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Meari's center of circulation is elongated and there are "multiple minor vorticies developing and rotating cyclonically around the center." During the morning hours on June 23, AIRS data and microwave satellite data showed that convection has consolidated around the center, helping to better pinpoint the center in this massive storm system.

As Meari continues on a northward track it will run into cooler sea surface temperatures in the Yellow Sea, they will weaken the tropical storm quickly.

Meari's center is forecast now to remain at sea and brush Taiwan, eastern China and make landfall in the southwestern area of North Korea this weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 22, 2011

This AIRS infrared image shows most of the strongest thunderstorms (purple) around the center of circulation. › View larger image
Tropical Storm Meari's cold thunderstorm cloud tops were captured on this infrared image from NASA's AIRS instrument on June 21 at 17:11 UTC (1:11 p.m. EDT). AIRS flies on NASA's Aqua satellite. This image shows most of the strongest thunderstorms (purple) around the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Sees Massive Tropical Storm Meari Headed for Taiwan

The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the western North Pacific's seventh tropical depression become massive Tropical Storm Meari overnight. Meari is so large that it takes up almost the entire Philippine Sea and it's on track toward southeastern Taiwan.

Tropical Storm Meari's large area of cold thunderstorm cloud tops were captured on an infrared image from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on June 21 at 17:11 UTC (1:11 p.m. EDT). The strongest thunderstorms covered an area of hundreds of miles around what oddly appears to be two possible low-level circulation centers within the storm. There is one more dominant low-level circulation center where bands of thunderstorms are wrapping around it from the north. The secondary low-level center appears to be to the southeast where more bands of thunderstorms are wrapping around it from the southwest.

On June 22, Tropical Storm Meari had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kmh)with higher gusts. It is about 315 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines near 16.0 North and 125.9 East. It was moving northwestward near 15 knots (17 mph/28 kmh).

Meari is forecast to keep moving to the northwest for the next two days. It is expected to strengthen to typhoon status over that time, and before it reaches Taiwan. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center then expect Meari to cross into the Taiwan Strait and make cross over the eastern tip of China.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 21, 2011

MODIS captured this image of System 99W coming together in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. › View larger image
On June 20 at 04:17 UTC (12:17 a.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of System 99W coming together in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
System 99W Still Coming Together on NASA Satellite Imagery

System 99W looked as if it would develop into a tropical storm in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, but it's still coming together according to NASA satellite imagery and observations.

On June 20 at 04:17 UTC (12:17 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of System 99W coming together in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

On June 21, the center of circulation for System 99W was located near 11.0 North and 132.6 East, about 250 nautical miles west-northwest of the island of Palau. The maximum sustained winds are between 18 and 22 knots and the low pressure area is moving west-northwest at 10 knots.

The circulation center appears to be closed but elongated. Because the system is so large the system appears to be taking longer to organize, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). Despite the system taking its time to organize, the conditions of light winds and warm sea surface temperatures around the low remain favorable for development. Currently, System 99W has a "High" chance for becoming a tropical depression in the next 24 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 20, 2011

NASA's AIRS infrared imagery showed strong thunderstorms banding around the center of circulation (purple). › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99W on June 20 at 04:11 UTC (12:11 a.m. EDT). NASA's AIRS infrared imagery showed strong thunderstorms banding around the center of circulation (purple).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees New Northwestern Pacific Low Ripe for Tropical Development

NASA satellite imagery revealed that System 99W, a low pressure area in the northwestern Pacific Ocean appears ripe for development into a tropical depression.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99W on June 20 at 04:11 UTC (12:11 a.m. EDT) and took an infrared look at the developing low pressure area. It showed a large rounded area of strong thunderstorms with high, cold cloud tops around the center of circulation and extending to the east of the center. Those thunderstorms and the convection generating them is strengthening.

Today, June 20, System 99W is located between Yap and Palua in the northwestern Pacific. Its center is approximately located near 10.8 North and 135.5. East. The system is moving northwestward at 15 knots (17 mph /28 kmh) and away from those two islands.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center who forecasts tropical cyclones in that part of the world, gives System 99W a high chance of development in the next 12 to 24 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.