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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Jova (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
10.13.11
 
This AIRS infrared image shows Tropical Depression Irwin (left) and the remnants of Jova over southwestern Mexico (right). › View larger image
This infrared image from Oct. 13, 2011 at 4:41 a.m. EDT shows Tropical Depression Irwin (left) and the remnants of Jova over southwestern Mexico (right) as blue and purple areas. The purple areas indicate strong convection and heavy rainfall still occurring, where cloud top temperatures exceed -63F/-52C.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
This GOES-11 image shows Tropical Depression Irwin, the remnants of Jova, and Tropical Depression 12E. › View larger image
This GOES-11 satellite image from Oct. 13 at 8 a.m. EDT, shows Tropical Depression Irwin is still at sea (left), remnants of Jova are over southwestern Mexico, and Tropical Depression 12E was inland over southeastern Mexico. TD12E's cloud cover extends over the Yucatan Peninsula, Belize and Guatemala.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Satellites View Three Dying Tropical Systems in Eastern Pacific

Three tropical systems in the eastern Pacific Ocean: Tropical Depression Irwin, Post-tropical cyclone Jova, and the remnants of Tropical Depression 12E all appeared to be fading on NASA satellite imagery today.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern Pacific at 4:41 a.m. EDT, Thursday, Oct. 13, and captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression Irwin still in open waters and the remnants of post-tropical cyclone Jova inland over central Mexico. Irwin still had some strong convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) in a very small area, while all of the punch (strong convection) was now missing from post tropical cyclone Jova. Cloud top temperatures in Irwin were still near -63F/-52C in that small area of strong convection, while cloud tops in Jova have warmed and weakened.

That small area of disorganized convection seen in the AIRS image is enabling Irwin to still be classified as a tropical depression. The National Hurricane Center noted today that "the system is on the verge of losing the convective requirement of a tropical cyclone, and Irwin is expected to become a remnant low within 24 hours."

At 5 a.m. EDT today, Oct. 13, Irwin's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kmh). It was located about 230 miles (365 km) west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico near 18.3 North and 107.7 West. Irwin was moving to the northeast near 13 mph (20 kmh) and is expected to curve to the east then southeast, heading back toward the open ocean, where it is expected to fizzle out.

The remnants of post-tropical cyclone Jova dissipated over central Mexico. At 11 p.m. EDT last night, Oct. 12, the last known center of Jova was near 21.7 North and 104.2 West. At that time, Jova had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (30 mph). By 10 a.m. EDT on Oct. 13, Jova's remnants were dissipating. Skies over Mazatlan, Mexico were mostly clear, however there were some towering cumulus clouds observed. Further south at Zacatecas Airport, Mexico, mostly cloudy skies prevailed. On the west coast, Puerto Vallarta reported overcast skies with some light drizzle.

During the morning (EDT) on Oct. 13, Tropical Depression 12E was inland over southeastern Mexico, including the Yucatan Peninsula, Belize and Guatemala. It TD12E is now a broad area of low pressure and was seen on NOAA's GOES-11 satellite imagery. The GOES-11 satellite image was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. It showed that TD12E's clouds extended from southeastern Mexico eastward into the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The National Hurricane Center currently gives TD12E a "near zero percent" chance of regenerating.

Meanwhile, it is generating disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Some of those thunderstorms contain heavy rainfall over southeastern Mexico, the Yucatan, Belize and Guatemala.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



October 12, 2011

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Hurricane Jova Battering Western Mexico, 12E Forms Behind

The visible image of Hurricane Jova making landfall in western Mexico The visible image of Hurricane Jova on the left was taken from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 11 at 3:55 p.m. EDT. Jova was making landfall in western Mexico, and the eye was no longer visible. Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
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This infrared image shows Hurricane Jova over the Mexican coast, and farther to the southeast is System 99E This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 11 at 3:53 p.m. EDT shows Hurricane Jova over the Mexican coast, and farther to the southeast is Tropical Depression 12E, which still has a chance to develop into a tropical depression. Purple areas indicate strong thunderstorms, with cloud tops colder than -63F, and heavy rain. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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rainfall map of hurricane Jova off the west coast of Mexico The TRMM satellite passed above hurricane Jova off the west coast of Mexico on October 11, 2011 at 1 p.m EDT. The image above shows a rainfall analysis from TRMM's TMI and PR instruments combined with an image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner. This TRMM orbit shows that rainfall bands from the powerful category three hurricane were starting to drench coastal Mexico. Areas of heavy rain falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour appear in red. Yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Hurricane Jova made landfall in western Mexico and continues to batter the region today, as newly formed Tropical Depression 12E lingers behind it. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible and infrared look at Jova, and an infrared look at 12E, both of which had some strong convection.

Convection is rapidly rising air that condenses and forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone (generic name for hurricane, tropical storm or depression). When convection is strong, the thunderstorms they create typically have heavy rainfall, and that's what western Mexico is encountering from Jova today.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Jova, and developing System 99E during the afternoon of Oct. 11, it captured an infrared image of both storms from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument and a visible image of Jova from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. System 99E later strengthened and organized into Tropical Depression 12E.

The visible image of Hurricane Jova from MODIS showed Jova was making landfall in western Mexico, and the eye was no longer visible. The infrared image from the AIRS instrument at 3:53 p.m. EDT showed Hurricane Jova over the Mexican coast, and farther to the southeast is newly formed Tropical Depression 12E, which still a depression when Aqua flew over it yesterday. Both tropical cyclones had large areas of strong thunderstorms, with cloud top temperatures colder than -63F, and heavy rain.

Since yesterday, Jova has continued to move farther inland and keeps weakening from the interaction with land. As always whenever a hurricane or tropical cyclone moves over land, heavy rainfall is a serious threat.

Today, Oct. 12, a hurricane warning is in effect for Punta San Telmo Northward to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico, and a tropical storm warning is in effect from North of Cabo Corrientes to El Roblito, Mexico.

According to the National Hurricane Center, at 8 a.m. EDT, the center of Hurricane Jova was located near latitude 20.3 north and longitude 105.0 west, about 30 miles (50 km) south-southeast of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Jova's maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph, making it a Category one hurricane, but it is expected to weaken to tropical storm status later in the day. This hurricane winds only cover 30 miles in diameter, but tropical storm force winds cover 230 miles in diameter. Jova is moving toward the north near 9 mph (15 kmh) and is expected to slow down. The forecast track takes Jova north past Tepic, Mazatlan, and Culican over the next day or two.

In addition to Hurricane Jova, Tropical Depression 12E (TD12E) is causing its own watches and warnings. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Barra de Tonala, Mexico southeastward to the Mexico/Guatemala border. At 8 a.m. EDT today, TD12E has maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and it could become a tropical storm later today, according to the National Hurricane Center. It was located about 135 miles (220 km) southeast of Salina Cruz, Mexico near latitude 15.1 north and longitude 93.5 west. The depression is moving toward the north near 5 mph (7 kmh).

NASA AIRS infrared data showed deep convection becoming more widespread in bands of thunderstorms and west of the center of circulation, indicating strengthening is occurring. TD12E is expected to move inland tonight into the warning area.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

















October 11, 2011

NASA Gets an Icy Cold Wink from Hurricane Jova's Eye

Jova The visible image of Hurricane Jova on the left was taken from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 10 at 1:40 p.m. EDT. Jova's extreme northeastern clouds are already over western Mexico, and the eye is clearly visible. On the right, a visible image from the GOES-11 satellite on Oct. 11 at 12:45 p.m. EDT shows Jova's eye "closed." Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Several NASA satellites have been following Hurricane Jova since birth and over the last day, Jova's eye has "winked" at them.

Satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites have shown that Jova's eye was only sometimes visible and other times appeared cloud covered, making it appear as Jova "winking." Other satellites, such as NOAA's GOES-11 satellite captured Jova's "winks."

In a visible image of Hurricane Jova from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 10 at 1:40 p.m. EDT, the eye was clearly visible. A visible image from NOAA's GOES-11 satellite on Oct. 11 at 12:45 p.m. EDT showed Jova's eye "closed" (or cloud-filled). The NASA GOES Project and the MODIS Rapid Response Teams are both located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and processed those images.

In addition to Jova's wink, the infrared AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite got a cold stare from Jova's eye. Infrared data measures cloud top temperatures, and NASA AIRS instrument noticed they were as cold as -80 Celsius (-112 Fahrenheit) in the thunderstorms in Jova's eyewall. Those frigid cloud top temperatures indicate there's a tremendous amount of power in the storm. The colder the cloud tops, the higher and stronger they are- and Jova is very powerful.

Today, dangerous Hurricane Jova continues to slowly approach the southwestern coast of Mexico today. At 11 a.m. EDT today, Oct. 11, it was near 17.8 North and 105.6 West. That's about 120 miles (190 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, and 180 miles (290 km) south of Cabo Corrientes. Jova's maximum sustained winds were near 115 mph (185 kmh). Jova is moving to the north-northeast at 5 mph (7 kmh). The National Hurricane Center expects Jova to speed up a little and turn to the north tonight. That means that the eye of the hurricane will approach the Mexican coast today and make landfall this evening.

Warnings continue to be in effect for Mexico as Jova slowly nears. A Hurricane warning is in effect from Punta San Telmo to Cabo Corrientes. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from Lazaro Cardenas to Punta San Telmo and Cabo Corrientes to El Roblito. Residents in the warning areas can expect significant flooding from storm surge and rough seas. Rainfall is forecast between 6 and 12 inches, with isolated totals to 20 inches. Residents should check local forecasts and prepare for this powerful hurricane.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



October 7, 2011

The hot towers seen in Jova exceeded 17 km (10.5 miles) in height, indicating a lot of power › View larger image
The hot towers seen in Jova exceeded 17 km (10.5 miles) in height, indicating a lot of power in this tropical storm's heat engine.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
On Oct. 7, TRMM noticed areas of heavy rainfall (2 inches/50 mm/hr) around the center with › View larger image
On Oct. 7 at 12:13 EDT, the TRMM satellite noticed areas of heavy rainfall (2 inches/50 mm/hr - seen in red) around the center with "hot towers." The hot towers seen in Jova exceeded 17 km (10.5 miles) in height, indicating a lot of power in this tropical storm's heat engine. Light to moderate rainfall (green and blue) around much of the storm was falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Sees a Lot of Power in Strengthening Tropical Storm Jova, Mexico on Watch

A lot of changes are expected from Jova over the weekend and NASA's TRMM satellite spotted "hot towers" around the storm's center, indicating the storm is strengthening. Jova is also expected to head toward Mexico for a landfall on Monday.

The National Hurricane Center expects Jova to become a hurricane and do an "about face" and head east to the Mexican coast. Jova is also expected to make landfall on Monday, Oct. 10 in western central Mexico.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM measures rainfall from space and flew over Tropical Depression 10E early on Friday, Oct. 7 (at 12:13 a.m. EDT). TRMM noticed areas of heavy rainfall (2 inches/50 mm/hr) around the center with "hot towers." Hot towers are towering clouds that emit a tremendous amount of latent heat (thus, called "hot"). The hot towers seen in Jova exceeded 17 km (10.5 miles) in height, indicating a lot of power in this tropical storm's heat engine.

NASA research indicates that whenever a hot tower is spotted, a tropical cyclone will likely intensify within six hours. Tropical Depression 10E did just that as by 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 7 it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Jova, and it continues to intensify.

After Jova became a tropical storm it continued producing a large area of deep convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical storm or hurricane). There are also some curved banding features (bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the storm and into the center) in the northwestern quadrant of the storm that indicate further organization taking place.

At 11 a.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center forecast noted that Jova is expected to become a hurricane, and over the next couple of days, could become a major hurricane. Tropical Storm Jova's maximum sustained winds on Oct. 7 at 11 a.m. EDT were near 60 mph (95 kmh) and strengthening. Jova was centered about 535 miles (860 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico near 13.7 North and 110.2 West. It is moving to the northwest near 8 mph (13 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 999 millibars.

Jova is expected to turn toward the north (as it moves around an eroding ridge of high pressure located over Mexico) Saturday and become a hurricane. The NHC said that "A large trough moving into the southwestern U.S. should steer Jova toward toward the northeast by Saturday night." The official forecast shows Jova reaching the central Mexican coast early on Monday, Oct. 10, so residents should prepare now.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



October 6, 2011

Infrared image from AIRS shows the birth of Tropical Storm Irwin and Tropical Depression 10E. › View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows the birth of two tropical cyclones on Oct. 6. The larger and more powerful Tropical Storm Irwin (left) and the smaller, more compact Tropical Depression10E (right). The purple areas indicate the coldest, highest cloud tops and strongest thunderstorms.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Birth of Two Tropical Cyclones in Eastern Pacific

The tropics in the eastern Pacific were quiet for a couple of days after Hurricane Hilary dissipated, and today gave birth to Tropical Depression 10 and Tropical Storm Irwin. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of both storms and saw the powerful convection in the center of Irwin that enabled the storm to go from a depression to a tropical storm in a short time.

The eleventh tropical depression quickly grew into Tropical Storm Irwin this morning, as strong convection surged around its center of circulation. That convection (rising air that creates the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) was seen in infrared imagery taken early this morning, Oct. 6, from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The cold cloud tops from those strong thunderstorms were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) and represented the strength in the core of Irwin.

At 11 a.m. today, Oct. 6, Tropical Storm Irwin's maximum sustained winds had grown to 40 mph, after forming as a depression just 5 hours before. Irwin was located about 855 miles (1,375 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico near 12.4 North and 116.8 West. It was moving away from land to the west-northwest near 6 mph (9 kmh). The National Hurricane Center expects Irwin to turn to the north and then north-northeast tomorrow. Irwin is expected to strengthen slowly in the next 48 hours. Minimum central pressure was 1005 millibars.

Closer to land, NASA's Aqua satellite saw a smaller Tropical Depression 10E. Tropical Depression 10E (TD10E) appears pretty close to Tropical Storm Irwin on the AIRS infrared imagery. It is located to the east-southeast of Tropical Storm Irwin, and it appears to be a smaller, more compact, rounded area of strong convection. Specifically, TD10E is located near 10.3 North and 105.8 West, about 610 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico. It has maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh) and is moving to the west-northwest near 8 mph (13 kmh). The AIRS infrared data shows strong convection around the southwestern edge of the center of circulation, indicating that TD10E could also become a tropical storm shortly.

The National Hurricane Center noted that "The tropical cyclone is forecast to remain over warm waters and in a low (wind) shear environment during the next several days" and predicts it could become a hurricane in two or three days. By mid-day on Saturday, Oct. 8, the National Hurricane Center forecast projects TD10E to change course and "recurve ahead of a large trough (elongated area of low pressure) diving southeastward across the southwest United States and the Baja Peninsula."

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.