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Hurricane Season 2011: Hurricane Eugene (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
08.05.11
 
AIRS infrared image of Tropical Storm Eugene on August 5 at 10:05 UTC (6:05 a.m. EDT) › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Eugene in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 5 at 10:05 UTC (6:05 a.m. EDT) This infrared image was taken from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite and it revealed a weakening storm with warmer (blue) cloud top temperatures. Coldest temperatures appear in purple.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Visible image of Tropical Storm Eugene taken GOES-11 on August 5 at 15:30 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT) › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Eugene was taken by the GOES-11 satellite on August 5 at 15:30 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT) and shows that Eugene's eye is no longer visible. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
NASA Sees Warmer Cloud Tops in Infrared Imagery of Tropical Storm Eugene

Warmer cloud top temperatures mean that cloud heights in a tropical cyclone are dropping and the storm doesn't have as much power to push them higher in the atmosphere. That's what NASA infrared satellite imagery has revealed about Tropical Storm Eugene this morning.

During the very early morning hours (Eastern Daylight Time) on August 5, Eugene was still hurricane strength. Then the storm ran into cooler waters and a more stable atmosphere, weakening into a tropical storm.

That weakening was confirmed in satellite imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument (that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite) on August 5 at 10:05 UTC (6:05 a.m. EDT). Infrared imagery basically takes an object's temperature. The AIRS infrared image showed that the cloud top temperatures had warmed since midnight, indicating that the cloud heights dropped and the power behind the uplift that creates the thunderstorms had waned quickly.

At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT) on August 5, Tropical Storm Eugene's maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph (100 kmh). It was located at sea near 17.9 North and 123.3 West, about 935 miles (1500 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Eugene was still moving to the west-northwest at 13 mph (20 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 996 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center expect that Eugene will become a remnant low by Sunday, August 7 as it continues to move into a more stable environment and cooler waters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.















August 4, 2011

AIRS infrared image of Hurricane Eugene on August 4 at 09:23 UTC (5:23 a.m. EDT) . › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Eugene in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 4 at 09:23 UTC (5:23 a.m. EDT) This infrared image was taken from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite and it revealed a large area of very cold cloud top temperatures (purple) from strong thunderstorms around the eye of the storm.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Infrared NASA Satellite Imagery Confirms Strong Thunderstorms Around Hurricane Eugene's Eye

The eye of hurricane Eugene may be clear as it moves through the waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean, but the thunderstorms around it are solid and strong. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite confirms very cold cloud temperatures surrounding the eye, which indicate high, strong thunderstorms.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Eugene in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 4 at 09:23 UTC (5:23 a.m. EDT). The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument captured an infrared image that revealed a large area of very cold cloud top temperatures from strong thunderstorms around the eye of the storm. The cloud top temperatures of those thunderstorms were colder than -70 Fahrenheit, indicating very strong thunderstorms, and heavy rainfall. Fortunately, this hurricane is over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 4, Hurricane Eugene has maximum sustained winds near 120 mph, down from a category four hurricane to a category three hurricane. The eye of Hurricane Eugene was located near latitude 16.8 north and longitude 118.9 west. Eugene is moving west-northwest near 14 mph and expected to continue in that direction for the next couple of days. Because Eugene is now in cooler waters, further weakening is forecast. Eugene poses no threat to land.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 2, 2011

Intensifying Tropical Storm Eugene

TRMM image of Tropical Storm Eugene on 1 August 2011 at 1350 UTC.
› View larger image
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

The TRMM satellite showed that tropical storm Eugene was very well organized with heavy thunderstorms located south of a forming eyewall on 1 August 2011 at 1350 UTC.

Eugene is expected to move to the northwest and stay off the Mexican coast as have all eastern Pacific tropical cyclones except Beatriz so far this year.



GOES-11 satellite shows Hurricane Eugene (right) off the western Mexican coast on August 2, 2011 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). › View larger image
This "full disk" image of the eastern Pacific Ocean from the GOES-11 satellite shows Hurricane Eugene (right) off the western Mexican coast on August 2, 2011 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).
b>Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
GOES-11 Satellite Sees Large Hurricane Eugene

Hurricane Eugene has become a large hurricane in size and strength, and when the GOES-11 satellite captured an image of the eastern Pacific on August 2, Hurricane Eugene was very obvious because of its size.

The GOES-11 satellite, operated by NOAA, captured a "full disk" image of the eastern Pacific Ocean and showed Hurricane Eugene off the western Mexican coast on August 2, 2011 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). Although an eye was not visible in the image, Eugene is a category 2 hurricane. Eugene's tropical storm force winds extend out to 140 miles, putting the diameter of the storm at about 280 miles.

The NASA GOES Project created the full-disk image from GOES-11, that gives a great perspective of how large a hurricane can be on the face of the earth. The NASA GOES Project is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 2, Eugene's maximum sustained winds were near 100 mph and it could strengthen more. Eugene continues to remain off the western Mexican coast, stirring up rough surf along the western facing beaches. It was located near 14.0 North and 109.6 West, and moving to the west-northwest near 15 mph.

Eugene is expected to continue tracking in a west-northwest direction and not affect any land areas.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 1, 2011

Grainy image of Tropical Depression 5-E This infrared image of Tropical Depression 5E from the GOES-11 satellite \on July 31 shows a small storm off the western coast of Mexico. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project GOES-11 Sees Fifth Tropical Depression Form in Eastern Pacific

On Sunday, July 31, the GOES-11 satellite captured the formation of the fifth tropical depression in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

At 5 a.m. EDT, July 31, Tropical Depression 5-E (TD5E) formed well south of Acapulco, Mexico. GOES-11, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, watched on July 31, as a low pressure area strengthened quickly into tropical depression number 5E. Data from the NOAA managed GOES-11 satellite was processed at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

TD 5E was located about 430 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico near 10.7 North and 100.2 West. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph and it was moving to the west near 9 mph. Minimum central pressure was 1006 millibars.

TD 5E is expected to stay over open ocean and reach hurricane strength by Tuesday. That would give TD5E the name Eugene.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.