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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Emily (Caribbean Sea)
08.10.11
 
Image from TRMM showed remnants of tropical storm Emily on August 10, 2011 at 0227 UTC. › View larger image
This image from the TRMM satellite showed that the remnants of tropical storm Emily were still generating a few strong thunderstorms over the central Atlantic Ocean when the satellite passed above on August 10, 2011 at 0227 UTC.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM's Precipitation Radar revealed that a few of Emily's tallest thunderstorm towers reached over 11 km (~6.8 miles). › View larger image
TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) revealed that a few of the tallest thunderstorm towers in Emily's remnants reached to heights of over 11 km (~6.8 miles).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM Satellite Sees Emily's Remnants Travel Over Mid-Atlantic

The tropical storm that was, named Emily, is still generating some showers and thunderstorms over the northern mid-Atlantic Ocean, and the TRMM Satellite captured them on August 10, 2011.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measures rainfall from space. When TRMM passed over the remnants of tropical storm Emily, it captured rainfall data and noticed that Emily was still generating a few strong thunderstorms over the central Atlantic Ocean on August 10, 2011 at 0227 UTC (August 9 at 10:27 p.m EDT).

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) revealed that a few of the tallest thunderstorm towers in Emily's remnants reached to heights of over 11 km (~6.8 miles) and were dropping some areas of heavy rainfall, as much as 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

On August 10, Emily's remnants were located about 715 miles south-southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland. The showers and thunderstorms were disorganized and the atmospheric and oceanic environments were not conducive to redevelopment, because there's wind shear and cooler water temperatures in the area where Emily's remnants have moved. The remnants are moving into even cooler waters as they head to the northeast at about 20 mph and they interact with a frontal zone.

The National Hurricane Center noted on August 10, that the remnants have a near zero chance of regeneration.

Text credit: Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro, SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.








Approximate locations for Emily are shown with appropriate red symbols and the storm's 0000Z positions were labeled. › View larger image
Approximate locations for Emily are shown with appropriate red symbols and the storm's 0000Z positions were labeled. The TMPA analysis above indicates that Emily dropped the heaviest rainfall totals of close to 300 mm (~11.8 inches) in the Caribbean Sea south of the Dominican Republic.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
The TRMM satellite captured the rainfall rates occurring within the remnants of Emily on August 8 › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured the rainfall rates occurring within the remnants of Emily on August 8 being absorbed by a cold front near the northern Bahamas. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches (20-40 mm) per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Compiles Rainfall Totals for Tropical Storm Emily

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite measured almost a foot of rainfall from Tropical Storm Emily last week.

The TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) was conducted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and provides estimates of rainfall over the global tropics. TMPA rainfall totals associated with tropical storm Emily were compiled for the period from August 1 to 8, 2011. The TMPA analysis indicated that Emily dropped the heaviest rainfall totals of close to 300 mm (~11.8 inches) in the Caribbean Sea south of the Dominican Republic.

Tropical storm Emily formed near the island of Dominica in the Lesser Antilles on August 2, 2011. The storm was never well organized and dissipated to a trough of low pressure on August 4, 2011 when it clashed with the mountains of Hispaniola. Emily's flooding caused three deaths in the Dominican Republic and possibly one in Haiti. Emily also drenched the Bahamas with rainfall totals of over 200 mm (~7.9 inches) and was revived to tropical depression status before completely dissipating while moving northeastward into the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean on August 8, 2011.

For more information about the TRMM satellite, visit: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov.

For information about NASA's upcoming precipitation measurement mission, visit: http://pmm.nasa.gov/.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.














August 8, 2011

MODIS visible image on the reformed Tropical Depression Emily on August 6 at 2:25 p.m. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image on the reformed Tropical Depression Emily off the southern Florida coast on August 6 at 2:25 p.m. EDT. Emily's northeastern edge was over Grand Bahama Island, and her northwestern edge was brushing southeastern Florida.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS saw several areas around Emily's center of circulation with strong thunderstorms (purple) and heavy rain. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image on the reformed Tropical Depression Emily off the southern Florida coast on August 6 at 2:25 p.m. EDT. Emily's northeastern edge was over Grand Bahama Island, and her northwestern edge was brushing southeastern Florida.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellites Saw Tropical Depression Emily Struggle Over the Weekend

Former Tropical Storm Emily made a brief comeback this weekend after degenerating over the mountains of Hispaniola late last week, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Emily just after her "rebirth."

At 5 p.m. EDT on Saturday, August 6, Emily became a tropical depression for the second time in her life about 70 miles west-northwest of Great Abaco Island, near 26.9 North and 78.1 West. She was moving to the north at 8 mph and had a minimum central pressure of 1012 millibars. Maximum sustained winds were 30 mph.

At 18:25 UTC 2:25 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Emily, centered between southern Florida and the northern Bahamas. Emily's northeastern edge was over Grand Bahama Island at that time. Emily's northwestern edge was brushing southeastern Florida.

A close look at the visible imagery shows higher thunderstorms around the center of circulation that were casting shadows on the lower surrounding thunderstorms. Those higher thunderstorms around the center were an indication of strengthening and Emily's winds did pick up that night.

At the same time, another instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite took an infrared image of Emily's cloud top temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument saw several areas around Emily's center of circulation with highest, coldest, cloud tops, where thunderstorms were the strongest and the heaviest rain was falling. Those areas appeared southwest of the center.

Her winds peaked on Sunday, August 7 at 11 a.m. EDT when they reached 35 mph. At that time, she was near 30.1 North and 76.0 West, about 300 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina.

By 5 p.m. EDT on Sunday, August 7, just 24 hours after regaining her stature as a tropical depression, she was dissipating. Her winds were back down to 30 mph, and she was moving to the northeast near 17 mph. Maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph and pressure was 1011 millibars.

Monday, August 8 revealed that Emily was now a remnant elongated low pressure area centered near 32 North and 73 West. The remnants are being absorbed into a frontal boundary to the north.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 5, 2011

GOES-13 visible image Emily's remnant clouds on August 5 at 16:01 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) › View larger image
This visible image of Emily's remnant clouds was taken from the GOES-13 satellite on August 5 at 16:01 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
Still image from GOES-13 animation from August 3 to August 8 › View animation
GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from August 3 at 15:15 UTC (11:15 a.m. EDT) to August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola (bottom right) and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
GOES-13 Satellite Watches Emily Fizzle, Morph and Hope for a Comeback

A new animation from the GOES-13 satellite shows the creating and morphing of what was once Tropical Storm Emily into an elongated area of low pressure over the Caribbean Sea.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 provides continuous visible and infrared imagery of the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean basin from its position in space. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and compiled them into a video of Emily's life so far.

In an animation of GOES-13 satellite imagery, Emily is observed from August 3 through August 8 and shows Emily forming east of Hispaniola and moving west over the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern Cuba. On August 5, a still image from GOES-13 showed what appears to be the center of the low was just north of the eastern tip of Cuba. Higher thunderstorms in the center are casting small shadows on the lower, less powerful thunderstorms around them.

Emily is now a surface trough or elongated area of low pressure. The National Hurricane Center noted that Emily's remnants contain a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms extending from eastern Cuba northeastward across the southeastern Bahamas.

There's a good chance that Emily can make a comeback and get her act together on the weekend as upper-level winds become more favorable. The National Hurricane Center gives Emily a 60% chance of making that comeback over the weekend.

For weekend updates on Emily's remnants check out the NASA Hurricane webpage or NASA Hurricane on Facebook and Twitter.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.









August 4, 2011

Visible image of Tropical Storm Emily from MODIS taken on August 4 at 15:30 UTC. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Emily was taken from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite on August 4 at 15:30 UTC when it was centered just south of the Dominican Republic and bringing rains there and to Haiti. By August 5, it was still relatively in the same place.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees a Meandering Tropical Storm Emily

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Emily mid-day on August 4, its center was located south of the Dominican Republic. Later it moved slightly west and just south of Haiti, bringing heavy rainfall with it.

A visible image of Tropical Storm Emily was taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite on August 4 at 15:30 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT). By Friday morning, August 5, if Emily survives its track over the mountains of Hispaniola, it is expected to move over eastern Cuba as it begins a northwesterly then northeasterly track. If it doesn't survive the mountain encounter, it could degenerate into a tropical wave later today, according to the National Hurricane Center.

At 2 p.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Emily had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph. It was located about 60 miles (100 km) south-southwest of Port Au Prince, Haiti, near 17.8 North and 72.8 West. It was moving to the west-northwest near 10 mph (16 kmh) and had a minimum central pressure of 1006 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Emily is bringing a tremendous amount of rain: "Emily is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 6 to 12 inches with isolated amounts of 20 inches possible over the Dominican Republic and Haiti." In addition to tropical storm-force winds, storm surge would raise water levels by 1 to 2 feet over the normal tide levels over the southern coast of Hispaniola and eastern Cuba.

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 2, 2011

Tropical Storm Emily View From TRMM

TRMM rainfall analysis of Emily from August 2, 2011 at 0137 UTC (9:37 PM AST).
› View larger image Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) announced the formation of tropical storm Emily on 1 August 2011 at 2330 UTC (7:30 PM AST). The TRMM satellite flew over the storm a short time later on 2 August 2011 at 0137 UTC (9:37 PM AST). A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data is shown on the right.

This analysis shows that relatively little rainfall was occurring near the storm's approximate center that is indicated by a red tropical storm symbol. Moderate rainfall was revealed in a large feeder band on the eastern side of the storm.

Emily is predicted to move toward the northwest and not strengthen above tropical storm intensity. It's passage is predicted to cause heavy rainfall over Puerto Rico, the northern Windward Islands, and the Dominican Republic.



Infrared image of Tropical Storm Emily on 8-3-11 › View larger image
NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the space agency's Aqua spacecraft continues to track the gradual organization of Tropical Storm Emily, as seen in this infrared image taken Aug. 3, 2011 at 1:53 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA/JPL
NASA Image Captures Emily's Trek Toward Hispaniola

Tropical Storm Emily continues its march toward Hispaniola, which it is expected to reach later on Aug. 3. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecraft captured this infrared image of Emily at 1:53 p.m. EDT (17:53 UTC) on Aug. 3, with the storm located about 125 miles (201 kilometers) south of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Emily is moving west at 14 miles per hour (12 knots). Its maximum winds are currently at approximately 50 miles per hour (45 knots). The storm is expected to weaken as it passes over Hispaniola. After crossing the island, the storm is expected to resume a slow strengthening trend on its passage through the Bahamas and off the U.S. east coast.

Emily is expected to bring torrential rains to Hispaniola—6 to 12 inches (15 to 30 centimeters), with up to 20 inches (51 centimeters) possible in places. Life-threatening flash floods and mudslides are possible in mountainous terrain. A storm surge of 1 to 2 feet (0.3 to 0.6 meters) above normal tidal levels will occur in the tropical storm warning area, with large and dangerous waves near the coast.

The AIRS data create an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, data that are useful to forecasters. The image shows the temperature of Emily's cloud tops or the surface of Earth in cloud-free regions. The coldest cloud-top temperatures appear in purple, indicating towering cold clouds and heavy precipitation. The infrared signal of AIRS does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds, AIRS reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

AIRS is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about AIRS can be found at http://airs.jpl.nasa.gov .



Infrared image of Tropical Storm Emily › View larger image
NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the space agency's Aqua spacecraft continues to track the gradual organization of Tropical Storm Emily, as seen in this infrared image taken Aug. 2, 2011 at 1:05 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA/JPL
NASA Image Shows a Slightly Stronger Emily

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the space agency's Aqua spacecraft continues to track the gradual organization of Tropical Storm Emily, as seen in this infrared image taken Aug. 2, 2011 at 1:05 p.m. EDT. At that time, the storm was located about 270 miles southeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico and nearly stationary in position, with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (35 knots). As of 5 p.m. EDT, the storm had begun to move slowly westward again and had increased in intensity slightly to about 52 miles per hour (45 knots), with gusts to 63 miles per hour (55 knots). Tropical storm watches are currently in effect for the southeast Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Tropical storm warnings remain in effect for Puerto Rico, Vieques and Culebra, the Dominican Republic and Haiti.

According to the NOAA's National Hurricane Center, the cloud pattern associated with Emily has become slightly better organized, but the storm's circulation is not yet well defined and barometric pressures have not fallen significantly since Aug. 1. Conditions appear favorable for slight strengthening before the storm moves over mountainous Hispaniola on Aug. 3, which may dissipate the storm. Should the storm survive the trip over Hispaniola, upper-level atmospheric winds are forecast to be more conducive for re-intensification once Emily moves over the southeast or central Bahamas. Computer models continue to show a variety of forecasts for the storm, though most of them show Emily moving northward well offshore of the U.S. east coast.

The AIRS data create an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, data that are useful to forecasters. The image shows the temperature of Emily's cloud tops or the surface of Earth in cloud-free regions. The coldest cloud-top temperatures appear in purple, indicating towering cold clouds and heavy precipitation. The infrared signal of AIRS does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds, AIRS reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

AIRS is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about AIRS can be found at http://airs.jpl.nasa.gov .



AIRS infrared image of Tropical Storm Emily was captured on Aug. 2 at 6:17 UTC (2:17 a.m. EDT) › View larger image
This AIRS infrared image was captured on Aug. 2 at 6:17 UTC (2:17 a.m. EDT) and shows the eastern half of Tropical Storm Emily already passed the Windward and Leeward Islands. Strong thunderstorms appear in purple, bringing heavy rainfall.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Emily Forms in Caribbean, NASA Sees Heavy Rainfall Within

Heavy rainfall is something that newly formed Tropical Storm Emily is bringing to the islands in its path in the Caribbean. Infrared satellite imagery shows strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops, bearing heavy rainfall.

An infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite was captured on Aug. 2 at 6:17 UTC (2:17 a.m. EDT) and showed the eastern half of Tropical Storm Emily already passed the Windward and Leeward Islands, and as Emily continues moving through, she's dumping heavy rainfall.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for Puerto Rico, the Domenican Republic and Haiti, while a tropical storm watch is in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands.

At 11 a.m. EDT, Emily's maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph and slight strengthening is expected. She's now near 15.3 North and 63.6 West, and is expected to start moving in a westerly to northwesterly direction. St. Thomas reported a wind gust to 49 mph today.

Between 2 to 4 inches or rainfall are possible in the northern Windward and Leeward Islands. Between 4 to 6 inches in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, with isolated amounts up to 10 inches.

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.