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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Cindy (North Atlantic Ocean)
07.22.11
 
Infrared image from the GOES-13 satellite on July 22 shows Bret, Cindy, Low#1 and Hurricane Dora. › View larger labeled image
› View larger unlabeled image
In this infrared image from the GOES-13 satellite on July 22 at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT) Bret and Cindy are in the Atlantic, Low#1 (from a tropical wave) is in the Caribbean and Hurricane Dora is in the eastern Pacific, off the coast of Mexico.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
NASA Catches 3 Tropical Cyclones at One Time

It's not often that a satellite can capture an image of more than one tropical cyclone, but the GOES-13 satellite managed to get 3 tropical cyclones in two ocean basins in one image today. Bret and his "sister" Cindy are racing through the North Atlantic, while another area tries to develop far to their south. "Cousin" Dora is still a hurricane in the eastern Pacific.

In infrared image taken on July 22 at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT), GOES-13 captured Tropical Depression Bret, Tropical Storm Cindy in the north Atlantic and low pressure area associated with a tropical wave in the Caribbean and Hurricane Dora is in the eastern Pacific, off the coast of Mexico. Cindy is 910 miles west-northwest of the Azores and Bret 295 miles northwest of Bermuda.

NASA's GOES Project issued an infrared image of both Bret and Cindy today from the GOES-13 satellite, which is operated by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project is housed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. and uses GOES-13 data from NOAA to create images and animations.

Bret Being Battered

During the morning of July 22 Bret has sped up on his track through the north Atlantic and weakened. Bret is being battered by winds and cooler waters.

Bret was a tropical depression at 8 a.m. EDT on July 22, with maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh). He was speeding to the northeast near 21 mph (33 kmh). Bret's center was near 36.7 North and 66.5 West. Bret's minimum central pressure was near 1008 millibars.

Bret is now experiencing very strong wind shear and moving into cooler waters, two factors that will help dissipate the depression over the weekend. Those waters that Bret is moving into are cooler than 71 Fahrenheit (22 Celsius), about 9 degrees cooler than the threshold of warmth needed to keep a tropical cyclone going.

Tropical Storm Cindy Racing North

As Bret has sped up in his race across the Atlantic, so has his sister Cindy. Cindy is actually out-racing Bret, as she's moving to the northeast near 29 mph (46 kmh) in the far north Atlantic Ocean. She is expected to continue moving in this direction over the weekend. GOES-13 satellite data showed that her cloud pattern has become ragged overnight.

She was located about 805 miles northwest of the Azores near 44. 5 North and 39.9 West. Her maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kmh), so she's stronger than her "brother" Bret, who is now down to tropical depression status. Because Cindy is now in very cold water (68F/20C), weakening is forecast and like Bret, she could dissipate over the weekend well to the west of the British Isles.

A Tropical Wave Trying to Get Organized

Far to the south of both Bret and Cindy a low pressure area belonging to a tropical wave in the Caribbean is trying to get organized. As of July 22, the National Hurricane Center noted that there's only a 20 percent chance that the low will get its act together over the weekend.

The low pressure area is located about 425 miles east of the Windward Islands, near 15 N and 50 W, and is kicking up scattered showers and thunderstorms. It is moving almost as fast as Bret, and is headed west-northwest between 15 and 20 mph. During July 22 and 23, that low pressure area is expected to bring locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds to parts of the Lesser Antilles.

Hurricane Dora Weakening Hurricane Dora continues to weaken from northerly wind shear as it moves northwest into cooler waters as cool as 23 Celsius.

At 8 a.m. EDT on July 22, Dora has weakened to a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale as it continues to parallel the western coast of Mexico and move in a northwesterly direction about 9 mph (15 kmh). Dora's maximum sustained winds are now near 90 mph (150 kmh). It is centered about 255 miles (415 km) south of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico near 19.2 North and 109.2 West. Minimum central pressure is 977 milibars.

There is a tropical storm warning in effect in Mexico from Agua Blanca to Buenavista including Cabo San Lucas. That means that tropical storm conditions exist somewhere in the warning area or will within 24 hours. Tropical Storm-force winds are likely in the warning area as Dora's center stays off the coast, and hurricane-force winds only extend out 35 miles from her center.

Southwestern Mexico and Baja California beaches and coastal areas will be hit with large and dangerous ocean swells. These swells will likely cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

By Monday, July 25, Bret and Cindy may be off the books while Dora is expected to last through the weekend. As for the tropical wave in the Atlantic, GOES-13 will keep a close eye on it.

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 21, 2011

GOES-13 captured Tropical Storm Bret (lower left) and Tropical Storm Cindy (upper right) in the North Atlantic. › View larger image
This infrared image from the GOES-13 satellite captured both Tropical Storm Bret (lower left) and newborn Tropical Storm Cindy (upper right) at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT) in the North Atlantic.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NASA Sees Tropical Storms Bret and Now Cindy Frolic in North Atlantic

Two tropical storms are now in the open waters of the North Atlantic: Bret and Cindy. Both were captured on one image from NASA today. Both storms are hundreds of miles to the east-northeast of Bermuda and pose no threat to land areas.

NASA's GOES Project issued an infrared image of both Bret and Cindy today from the GOES-13 satellite, which is operated by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project is housed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. and uses GOES-13 data from NOAA to create images and animations. The image was captured at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT) and shows Bret about 405 miles east-southeast of Bermuda, while Cindy is about 975 miles east-northeast of Bermuda.

At 5 a.m. EDT, Bret was still holding on to tropical storm status with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph, just over the 39 mph threshold. It was moving to the northeast near 8 mph and is expected to continue in this direction while speeding up and weakening over the next couple of days. Bret's center was near 33.1 North latitude and 71.7 West longitude. Bret is expected to dissipate by the weekend. Infrared satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite indicated that the cloud top temperatures in the southern quadrant of the Bret are as cold as -70 Celsius, indicating strong, high thunderstorms and strong convection.

Meanwhile Tropical Storm Cindy developed overnight from System 99L that NASA was watching yesterday afternoon. Cindy developed into Tropical Depression 3, and quickly grew into a tropical storm and got her name.

As of 5 a.m. EDT today, July 21, Cindy's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph, and she's expected to strengthen over the next day before colder waters sap her energy. She's centered near 38.3 North and 49.1 West and moving to the northeast at a speedy 28 mph. Cindy's forward speed is also expected to increase over the next couple of days. Her minimum central pressure is near 1002 millibars.

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



July 20, 2011

Visible image from GOES-13 shows System 99L (far right), Tropical Storm Bret, and Hurricane Dora. › View larger image
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite on July 20 at 14:45 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) and shows a consolidating System 99L (far right) in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Bret about 255 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and a large Hurricane Dora off the west coast of Mexico.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
GOES Satellite Sees a Triple Header in the Tropics

The GOES-13 satellite captured a triple-header in the tropics today when it captured three tropical cyclones in one image in the Northern Hemisphere.

A visible image taken from the GOES-13 satellite on July 20 at 14:45 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) and shows a consolidating low pressure area called System 99L in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, Tropical Storm Bret several hundred miles east of South Carolina, and a large Hurricane Dora off the west coast of Mexico. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

System 99L is a low pressure area that may to reach tropical depression status in the next day or two. It is located about 550 miles east-northeast of Bermuda and is moving to the northeast at 20 mph.

At 2 p.m. EDT on July 20, satellite imagery showed that showers and thunderstorms have become better organized within System 99L. The low-level circulation is also becoming better defined and the storm appears primed to become a tropical depression. If that happens, it would be Tropical Depression 3 (TD3) in the Atlantic Ocean basin. The National Hurricane Center gives it a 90 percent chance of coming together as TD3 in the next 48 hours.

Text credit:Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.