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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Anthony (Southwest Pacific Ocean)
01.31.11
 
Tropical Cyclone Anthony Made Landfall Near Bowen, Australia

Tropical Cyclone Anthony did make landfall this weekend near Bowen, Australia bringing heavy rains and gusty winds.

Bowen is located in Queensland, Australia, and is in the northern region of the Whitsundays, located on the shores of Edgecumbe Bay.

On Sunday, January 30 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) or 1:00 a.m. Monday, January 31 in Australia/Brisbane local time, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on Tropical Cyclone Anthony. By that time, Anthony had already been inland by three hours after making landfall near Bowen.

As Anthony made landfall, it was reported to have sustained winds of up to 90 mph (150 km/hr). Anthony made landfall near low tide, so storm surge was not an issue with this storm. However, rough surf continues today between Townsville and Bowen.

While inland, Anthony's maximum sustained winds were still near 40 knots (46 mph/ 74 km/hr) three hours after landfall. It was located near 20.0 South and 148.3 East, or about 225 miles (362 km) southeast of Cairns.

The heaviest rainfall occurred to the south of the center of the system and over 200 mm fell as Anthony made landfall and progressed inland. As a result, moderate flooding is forecast to occur through the Pioneer Valley. Remnants of Anthony are still dumping heavy rain inland today as it continues moving west and weakening.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



January 28, 2011

NASA Satellite Sees Cyclone Anthony Making an Australian Comeback

Rainfall analysis from TRMM showed that a small area of heavy thunderstorms in the northeast quadrant Anthony. › View larger image
A rainfall analysis from the TRMM satellite on January 28 showed that Anthony had a small area of heavy thunderstorms in the northeast quadrant of the storm. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour. Red areas are heavy rainfall at almost 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. Queensland, Australia is visible in the bottom left corner of the image.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Tropical Storm Anthony moved away from Queensland, Australia earlier this week and is now making a comeback after a U-turn in the Coral Sea. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite captured some areas of heavy rain in the cyclone as warnings are again posted in Queensland, and a landfall may be possible this weekend.

On Friday, January 28, 2011, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology posted a High Seas weather warning and a Gale warning for the northeastern area of Queensland. Anthony has regained strength after being downgraded to a remnant low pressure area and is once again a tropical storm.

At 1800 UTC on January 28 (4:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 29, 2011 in Australia/Brisbane local time) Tropical Cyclone Anthony was centered near 16.1 South and 154.7 East in the Coral Sea. It was almost quasi-stationary and had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph / 65 km/hr). Anthony is currently about 490 nautical miles east northeast of Townsville.

NASA and the Japanese Space Agency's TRMM satellite had a good daylight look at Anthony on January 28 at 0600 UTC (4 p.m. local time). A rainfall analysis from TRMM data showed that Anthony had a small area of heavy thunderstorms in the northeast quadrant of the storm where rain was falling at about 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. An underlay image from TRMM's Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) also revealed that Anthony's center of circulation was clearly evident.

For the latest weather warnings from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM), go to: http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/warnings/index.shtml. Current forecasts from the ABM calls for a possible landfall of Tropical Storm Anthony on Sunday, January 31 near Townsville. Residents should closely monitor their local forecasts over the weekend.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



January 27, 2011

NASA Satellite Imagery Shows Tropical Depression Anthony Re-Energizing

The cold areas in this image (yellow-green) indicate where there is precipitation or ice in Anthony's cloud tops. › View larger image
In the January 27 at 14:59 UTC NASA Microwave AIRS image, it appears that Anthony is a single storm, with three areas of intense convection/precipitation. Microwave images are created when data from NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS and AMSU instruments are combined. The cold areas in this image (yellow-green) indicate where there is precipitation or ice in the cloud tops. The microwave image suggests cold, high thunderstorms.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
AIRS image of Anthony seems to have two large areas of high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) with intense precipitation. › View larger image
This infrared NASA AIRS image of Tropical Depression Anthony seems to have two large areas of high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) with intense precipitation. The most intense precipitation is occurring in the areas shaded in purple where cloud top temperatures are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Infrared and Microwave satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite indicates that Tropical Depression Anthony is gaining strength and may once again become a tropical storm in the Coral Sea. Anthony has moved into an area with warmer waters and lower wind shear and now has a good chance of again becoming a tropical storm again.

Tropical Depression Anthony has spent the week in the Coral Sea, at first going east and now going west toward Queensland, Australia. NASA satellite data has followed the progression of Anthony this week and watched it weaken to a remnant low pressure area on January 26.

On January 27, an infrared image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of two large areas of high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) with intense precipitation in Tropical Depression Anthony. The most intense precipitation is occurring in two areas where cloud top temperatures were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

Infrared imagery measures temperatures and not only can it see cold, high cloud tops in tropical cyclones, but also the warm ocean waters that power the cyclones (if the sea surface temperatures are over 80 Fahrenheit). Cold cloud top temperatures provide clues about the power of the thunderstorms in a tropical cyclone. The colder the clouds are, the higher they are, and the more powerful the thunderstorms are that make up the cyclone.

AIRS data is also coupled with data from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) that flies with AIRS on Aqua to create microwave images of storms. The AMSU image uses the radiances of the 89 GHz channel, and the cold areas in those images indicate where there is precipitation or ice in the cloud tops. In the January 27 at 14:59 UTC NASA Microwave AIRS image, "it appeared that Anthony is a single storm, with three areas of intense convection/precipitation," said Ed Olsen, of the AIRS team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. where the AIRS images are created.

At 2032 UTC (3:32 p.m. EST) on January 27, Tropical Depression Anthony had maximum sustained winds between 25 and 30 knots (xxx mph/ km/hr). Anthony was located 695 nautical miles east of Cairns, Australia near 18.4 South and 157.8 East. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1002 millibars.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the potential for the development of a Significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is "good."

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



January 26, 2011

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical Depression Anthony Heading Toward Australia

The storm formerly known as Anthony › View larger image
NASA's Aqua Satellite captured this visible image on Jan. 26 at 03:23 UTC of a now weakened Tropical Depression Anthony as it continues to weaken in the South Pacific Ocean. Eastern Australia can be seen on the left side of this image.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite captured a visible image of the former Tropical Storm Anthony, now weakened to a tropical depression, but forecasters aren't counting Anthony out yet. Despite its weakened condition Anthony continues to move west toward Queensland, Australia and into a more favorable area for sustaining a tropical cyclone.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image on Jan. 26 at 03:23 UTC of Tropical Depression Anthony in the South Pacific Ocean. The image revealed a cloud-filled center of the storm.

At 0600 UTC (1 a.m. EST) on January 26, Anthony had progressed west and was now about 455 nautical miles west-northwest of Nomeau, New Caledonia. That places Anthony's center near 19.2 South and 159.1 East. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 25 to 30 knots (28 mph/46 km/hr to 34 mph/55 km/hr) meaning that Anthony is still at tropical depression status.

The infrared imagery from the AIRS instrument showed a well-defined low level circulation center, although dry air is now wrapping into Anthony's northern quadrant. Dry air saps the moisture that creates the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone. Generally, the storm's convection (rapidly rising air that creates those thunderstorms) is weak throughout the storm, and only isolated strong areas of convection appear in the southeastern quadrant. That may change in the next day or two, however, as Anthony moves into an area more conducive to maintaining a tropical cyclone.

Vertical wind shear (winds that can weaken a tropical cyclone) has lessened and sea surface temperatures are warm enough to sustain and strengthen a tropical cyclone (between 28 and 30 Celsius/82 and 86 Fahrenheit). Computer forecast models have shown forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center that as the system tracks westward toward Australia, there is a fair chance that Anthony will regenerate or re-strengthen in the next 24-36 hours. Forecasters in Queensland, Australia will be watching Anthony very closely.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



January 25, 2011

NASA Sees Tropical Storm Anthony U-turn in the Coral Sea

This AIRS image shows Anthony has done a U-Turn north of New Caledonia. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Anthony on January 25 at 02:35 UTC. The image shows Anthony has done a U-Turn north of New Caledonia. The coldest cloud tops (-63 Fahrenheit) and strongest thunderstorms appear in purple in this image.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Tropical Storm Anthony was headed east yesterday, and an area of high pressure is bringing the tropical storm back west toward Australia today.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Anthony on January 25 at 02:35 UTC. The image shows Anthony has done a U-Turn north of New Caledonia. The coldest cloud tops, currently over the open waters of the Coral Sea, are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Those cold cloud tops also indicate the strongest thunderstorms. Some convection has flared up near the center of the storm, as vertical wind shear has eased.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on January 25, Anthony's maximum sustained winds were near 30 knots (34 mph/55 km/hr). It was centered near 19.4 South latitude and 160.1 East longitude, about 355 nautical miles west-northwest of Noumea, New Caledonia. Anthony is quasi-stationary.

As Anthony now moves back toward the west, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasters expect the vertical wind shear to increase, which acts to weaken a tropical cyclone. In addition, cool, dry air is moving in from the south which will sap the warm, moist air that helps create the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone.

Some forecast models do show however, that Anthony will move into a moister environment in three days, which could breathe life back into the tropical cyclone.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



January 24, 2011

NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Moderate Rains in Tropical Cyclone Anthony

TRMM captured light to moderate rainfall falling in Tropical Storm Anthony on Sunday, January 23, 2011. › View larger image
TRMM captured light to moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 and 40 mm)per hour (yellow and green) falling in Tropical Storm Anthony on Sunday, January 23, 2011.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite identified light to moderate rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Anthony as it continues to pull away from Queensland, Australia today. Forecasters are watching Anthony however, it is expected to do a U-turn in the Coral Sea and head back.

On Sunday, Tropical cyclone Anthony formed 190 nautical miles (218 miles/351 km) east-northeast of Cairns, Australia. That's when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over the tropical cyclone and noticed light to moderate rainfall around the center of Anthony's center of circulation, falling between .78 and 1.57 inches (20 and 40 mm) per hour. Early this morning, Monday, January 24 Anthony was already 420 nautical miles (483 miles/777 km) east of Cairns, Australia, out in the Coral Sea.

At 1500 UTC on January 24, Anthony had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/64 km) making it a tropical storm. It was located about 820 nautical miles (943 miles/1,519 km) east-southeast of Cairns, Australia near 19.3 South and 160.1 East.

An infrared satellite image from an Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument showed convective banding of thunderstorms wrapping into Anthony's center from the northeastern quadrant today. AMSU is a multi-channel microwave radiometer installed on meteorological satellites. A version of AMSU flies on NASA's Aqua satellite. The instrument examines several bands of microwave radiation from the atmosphere to perform atmospheric sounding of temperature and moisture levels. The image also showed deep convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) reconsolidating over the low-level center of the storm indicating that the storm is maintaining strength or strengthening.

Strong vertical wind shear currently extends into the Coral Sea where Anthony is located which is expected to limit any strengthening. Anthony is expected to make a U-turn and head west in the next day as a ridge (elongated area) of high pressure takes over steering the storm and forecasters in Australia are keeping a close eye on the storm.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD