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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm Adrian (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
06.13.11
 
MODIS showed a rounded-pinwheel shaped Hurricane Adrian with a very visible eye on June 10 at 20:10 UTC. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a rounded-pinwheel shaped Hurricane Adrian with a very visible eye on June 10 at 20:10 UTC (4:10 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Adrian's Remnants Hung Around One More Day

The National Hurricane Center reported on the morning of June 14 (Eastern Daylight Time) that the remnant low pressure area that was once powerful Hurricane Adrian managed to survive the overnight period but is weakening quickly near 17 North and 118 West. Pressure is estimated near 1011 millibars. Adrian is expected to dissipate now within 24 hours. No other tropical cyclone formation expected elsewhere.

Text credit: Rob GutroNASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.











June 10, 2011 MODIS showed a rounded-pinwheel shaped Hurricane Adrian with a very visible eye on June 10 at 20:10 UTC. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a rounded-pinwheel shaped Hurricane Adrian with a very visible eye on June 10 at 20:10 UTC (4:10 p.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
GOES-11 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project that shows the end of Adrian. › View GOES-11 video
GOES-11 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the end of Adrian. The animation runs from June 11 at 1300 UTC (9 a.m. EDT) to June 13 at 1300 UTC (9:00 a.m. EDT) and by that end time, Adrian has faded.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Stunning NASA Imagery and Movie Released of a Now Gone Hurricane Adrian

Some satellite images are striking and memorable, while others are just interesting. On June 10, NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Hurricane Adrian from space and sent a stunning image to the science team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Meanwhile a GOES-11 Satellite animation shows how and when Adrian fizzled.

Adrian is no more in the Eastern Pacific as of June 13, 2011, but the Aqua satellite image it left behind will be remembered this hurricane season.

The visible image was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that flies aboard NASA's Aqua (and Terra) satellite on June 10 at 20:10 UTC (4:10 p.m. EDT). The image shows a rounded-pinwheel shaped Adrian with a very visible eye. High, strong thunderstorms in the center of the image cast shadows on the lower thunderclouds around the eye. The bright white color of Hurricane Adrian in contrast to the blue waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean provide a stunning image.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-11, operated by NOAA watched Adrian this weekend as it faded in the Eastern Pacific. GOES-11 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the end of Adrian. The animation runs from June 11 at 1300 UTC (9 a.m. EDT) to June 13 at 1300 UTC (9:00 a.m. EDT) and by that end time, Adrian had faded.

On Saturday, June 11 when the GOES-11 animation began, Adrian was still a hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 75 knots (86 mph/~139 kmh) . It was centered near 15.8 North and 110.5 West in the Eastern Pacific with a minimum central pressure of 979 millibars. By mid-day, Adrian had weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 60 knots.

By Sunday, June 12 at 1545 UTC (11:45 a.m. EDT) Adrian had weakened to remnant low pressure area status. It was located near 16.5 North and 115.8 West. The remnant low had a minimum central pressure estimated to be near 1004 millibars. It was moving west-northwest near 10 knots ~11 mph/~18 kmh) and had maximum sustained winds between 20 and 30 knots (23 and 34 mph/37 and 55 kmh).

The National Hurricane Center described Adrian's remnants mid-day Sunday (EDT) as "a tight swirl of low level clouds with scattered moderate convection flaring within 120 nautical miles over the northeastern semicircle of the center." The low is dissipating today, June 13.

Text credit: Rob Gutro and Hal Pierce, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






June 10, 2011> GOES-11 Hurricane Adrian and the eye of the storm is apparent even through some clouds over it. › View larger image
GOES-11 captured an image of Hurricane Adrian on June 10 at 1500 UTC (11:00 a.m. EDT) and the eye of the storm is apparent even through some clouds over it.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Infrared image of Hurricane Adrian shows strong thunderstorms around the center of Adrian's center and an eye in blue. › View larger image
This infrared image of Hurricane Adrian on June 10 at 09:17 UTC (5:17 a.m. EDT) from the NASA AIRS instrument shows strong thunderstorms (purple) around the center of Adrian's center and an eye in blue (lower, warmer clouds).
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Eye Say, Adrian is Still a Powerful Hurricane on NASA Satellite Imagery

Hurricane Adrian has been good at hiding his eye from satellite imagery over the last two days, but the latest Aqua and GOES-13 satellite imagery provides the best look at the eye, despite some overcast inside.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-11 captured a visible image of Major Hurricane Adrian on June 10 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT).The image, that shows the eye of the storm with some dense overcast in it, was made at the NASA GOES Project out of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. GOES-13 is managed by NOAA.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on June 10 at 09:17 UTC (5:17 a.m. EDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument took an infrared image of Adrian. AIRS images are false colored to show cloud temperature where purple colorations indicate the highest, coldest cloud top temperatures (usually colder than -63F/-52C). Today's image showed a large area of those cold cloud tops (indicating strong thunderstorms around the center of the storm) with warmer cloud temperatures (in blue) in the center - revealing an eye.

At 8 a.m. PDT (11 a.m. EDT), Hurricane Adrian had maximum sustained winds near 135 mph (215 kmh) and was located about 375 miles (600 km) south-southwest of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico near 15.3 North and 107.6 West. It was moving away from land to the west-northwest at 9 mph (15 km/h) and had a minimum central pressure of 948 millibars.

Adrian is expected to stay at sea but will continue to stir up rough surf along the southwestern coast of Mexico through the early part of the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro and Hal Pierce, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






NASA's Infrared Image of Major Hurricane Adrian Reveals its Stormy Life's Blood

image of Adrian based on satellite data ›View larger image
This 3-D image of Major Hurricane Adrian was created from data on June 9 and show thunderstorms dropping rain at a rate of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches) in a nearly circular eye wall. The PR also indicated that some thunderstorms in the eye wall were shooting up to heights above 15 km (~9.3 miles).
Credit: NASA/SSAI: Hal Pierce
image of Adrian based on satellite data ›View larger image
NASA AIRS imagery (taken from the Aqua satellite) from today, June 9 at 8:29 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT) shows a large area of strong thunderstorms (purple) surrounding the center where an eye has formed but is obscured by dense overcast clouds.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
image of Adrian based on satellite data › View larger image
The TRMM satellite flew over Adrian when it was a tropical depression on June 7, 2011 at 1717 UTC (1:17 p.m. EDT) and noticed strong, towering thunderstorms (hot towers in red) that were as high as 15 km (9.3 miles) around its center of circulation, indicating strengthening. Bands of rainfall were also starting to get organized.
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
Strong thunderstorms are the life's blood of tropical cyclones, and infrared and radar satellite data from NASA today confirms that the eastern Pacific Ocean's first hurricane has plenty of them and they're over 9 miles high. Adrian exploded in growth overnight from a tropical storm on June 8 to a major hurricane today.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Hurricane Adrian this morning at 8:29 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT), and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument took an infrared snapshot of the storm's many strong thunderstorms and warm ocean water below.

The infrared data suggests that Adrian has an eye, as in the center of circulation on the infrared image is a blue-colored U-shape. Because AIRS imagery is false-colored, purple represents the highest, coldest cloud tops and strongest thunderstorms, and blue represents lower, warmer cloud tops. The coldest cloud top temperatures are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). The blue area in the center of the larger area of purple in the imagery suggests that some overcast clouds are obscuring an eye. Other satellite data has confirmed the eye.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured rainfall and cloud data from Hurricane Adrian when it passed directly above on June 9, 2011 at 0714 UTC (3:14 a.m. EDT). The increasingly powerful hurricane had sustained winds estimated to be close to 80 kts (~92 mph) at the time of this pass. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument revealed that beneath the clouds there were intense thunderstorms dropping rain at a rate of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches) in a nearly circular eye wall. The PR also indicated that some thunderstorms in the eye wall were shooting up to heights above 15 km (~9.3 miles).

At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT), Hurricane Adrian had maximum sustained winds near 115 mph, making it a category three on the Saffir-Simpson scale and the season's first major hurricane as well as the first hurricane in the eastern Pacific. Hurricane force winds extend out from the center by up to 30 miles (45 km) and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 80 miles (130 km).

Adrian was about 440 miles (710 km) south-southeast of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico near 14.2 North and 104.1 West. It was moving west-northwest near 9 mph (15 kmh) with a minimum central pressure of 960 millibars.

Hurricane Adrian's strength and proximity to land means that Southwestern Mexico's coastline will continue to get large swells and rip currents through the early part of the weekend. Adrian is expected to enter cooler waters by the early weekend which will sap some of his strength. The National Hurricane Center forecasts Adrian to continue moving out to sea and away from land.

Text credit: Rob Gutro and Hal Pierce, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.













June 8, 2011

GOES reveals that Adrian has some higher, stronger thunderstorms in the center. › View larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Adrian was taken from the GOES-11 satellite on June 8 at 12:00 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) and shows a compact, rounded storm off the western Mexico coast. The image reveals that Adrian has some higher, stronger thunderstorms in the center that are casting shadows on lower clouds around them.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
NASA's TRMM satellite captured the rainfall occurring in Tropical Depression 1E  on June 7 at 0727 UTC (3:27 a.m. EDT). › View larger image
NASA's TRMM satellite captured the rainfall occurring in Tropical Depression 1E on June 7 at 0727 UTC (3:27 a.m. EDT). A red circle shows the location of the ONE-E's center of circulation at that time. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA Goddard, Hal Pierce
A Double-Satellite NASA-Style View of the First Tropical Storm in Eastern Pacific: Adrian

The first tropical depression in the Eastern Pacific Ocean is now the first tropical storm, and two satellites are providing NASA insights into its thunderstorms, rainfall, and intensity. NASA satellite data on newly born Tropical Storm Adrian shows high cloud tops and moderate rainfall, indications that the storm is getting stronger, triggering a tropical storm watch in Mexico.

Tropical Depression 1E is the first tropical depression of 2011 and formed in the eastern Pacific Ocean early on June 7. By the morning of June 8 it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Adrian, and is now forecast by the National Hurricane Center to reach hurricane strength. This morning, the government of Mexico posted a tropical storm watch for the Mexican coast from Acapulco, west to Punta San Telmo. That means conditions are possible in the watch area from 24 to 48 hours. Meanwhile, rough surf and rip currents can be expected in the southwestern Mexican coast later today.

When the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-11 passed over Tropical Storm Adrian earlier today, June 8 at 12:00 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT), an infrared image shows Adrian as a compact, rounded storm off the western Mexico coast. GOES satellites are managed by NOAA, and images and animations are created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project.

The GOES-11 image revealed that Adrian has some higher, stronger thunderstorms around the center of circulation that are casting shadows on lower clouds around them. Those higher thunderstorms are stronger than the surrounding thunderstorms, and are likely dropping heavy rainfall (as much as 2 inches/50 mm per hour). The higher thunderstorms are also a sign that the storm continues to strengthen.

Rainfall within Adrian was captured yesterday, June 7 at 0727 UTC (3:27 a.m. EDT), when it was still Tropical Depression 1E. That's when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew overhead. TRMM is like a flying rain gauge in space because its precipitation radar instrument can measure rainfall rates. At that time TRMM noticed that Tropical Depression 1E had moderate rainfall surrounding its low level center. Moderate rainfall rates are between .78 to 1.57 inches (20 to 40 mm) per hour.

Adrian was already close to hurricane strength this morning, June 8. At 8 a.m. PDT (11 a.m. EDT), Adrian's maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kmh. It was about 285 miles (455 km) south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico near 12.9 North and 100.8 West, and moving north-northwest near 5 mph (7 kmh). Minimum central pressure was 994 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center forecasts that Adrian will continue to strengthen and turn to the north-northwest, followed by a turn to the west-northwest.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 7, 2011

TRMM analyzed the rainfall rates within System 91E on June 6 and noticed that the majority of rainfall was moderate. › View larger image
TRMM analyzed the rainfall rates within System 91E on June 6 at 0823 UTC (4:23 p.m. EDT) before it strengthened into a depression and noticed that the majority of rainfall was moderate (yellow and green) between .78 to 1.57 inches (20-40 mm) per hour, with some isolated areas of heavy rainfall (red), falling at almost 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.
Credit: SSAI/NASA Goddard, Hal Pierce
Tropical Depression 1E is small but thunderstorm › View larger image
Tropical Depression 1E is small but thunderstorm "Hot Towers" have reached heights of about 16 km (~9.9 miles) indicating some strong convection (red) around the storm's center.
Credit: SSAI/NASA Goddard, Hal Pierce
NASA Sees a Hot Tower in First Tropical Depression of the Eastern Pacific

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM has the ability to see rainfall rates and heights of thunderstorm clouds within a tropical cyclone, and data from the satellite confirmed a "hot tower" near the center of the first tropical depression of the eastern Pacific Hurricane Season.

Tropical Depression 1E formed when the low pressure area called System 91E strengthened overnight. Today, June 7, Tropical Depression 1E (TD1E) was located about 365 miles (590 km) south of Acapulco, Mexico near 11.6 North and 100.0 West. It had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph (45 kmh) and was moving to the northwest near 3 mph (6 kmh). Minimum central pressure was near 1006 millibars.

When TRMM passed over TD1E yesterday morning (it was still System 91E at that time) at 0823 UTC (4:23 p.m. EDT) its precipitation radar instrument analyzed the rainfall rates The majority of rainfall occurring at that time was moderate between .78 to 1.57 inches (20-40 mm) per hour, with some isolated areas of heavy rainfall, falling at almost 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

More importantly, TRMM noticed some of the thunderstorms around the center of circulation were actually what is called "hot towers."

A hot tower is a rain cloud that reaches at least to the top of the troposphere, the lowest layer of the atmosphere. It extends approximately nine miles (14.5 km) high in the tropics. These towers are called "hot" because they rise to such altitude due to the large amount of latent heat. Water vapor releases this latent heat as it condenses into liquid. They're also indicative of a lot of energy within a tropical depression. In the case of Tropical Depression 1E, some of the hot towers reached heights of 16 km (~9.9 miles).

The National Hurricane Center forecasts TD1E to intensify and continue moving in an north-northwesterly direction, steering away from land.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





June 6, 2011

AIRS showed strong convection (purple) and thunderstorms in System 91E, about 425 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico. › View larger image
Infrared imagery on June 5 at 19:47 UTC (3:47 p.m. EDT/12:47 PDT) from the AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed strong convection (purple) and thunderstorms in System 91E, about 425 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Possible First Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression Shaping Up on NASA Imagery

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over a low pressure system in the Eastern Pacific and captured infrared imagery that show it to be well-defined and organizing. System 91E is shaping up to likely become the Eastern Pacific's first tropical depression of the season.

Located about 425 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico, System 91E is in a good spot for development: warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear. Those are two factors needed to help a tropical cyclone develop.

Infrared imagery on June 5 at 19:47 UTC (3:47 p.m. EDT/12:47 PDT) from the AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed a large area of strong convection and thunderstorms around the low-level circulation center ofSystem 91E.

The National Hurricane Center gives this low a 90 percent chance of development over the next two days, and if it becomes a tropical storm it would get the name Adrian.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.