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Hurricane Season 2011: System 99L (Atlantic Ocean)
11.22.11
 
At 6:45am EST, GOES-13 saw most of 99L's cloud cover on the north and east of the center of circulation. › View larger image
In an infrared image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite at 6:45 a.m. EST most of the cloud cover in System 99L appears on the north and east of the center of circulation.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Atlantic Ocean System 99L's Development Chances Fade Quickly

When a low pressure area struggling to develop into a tropical depression looks more like a cold front then you know the chances for its survival are greatly diminished. That's what's happening with the low pressure area in the central Atlantic called System 99L, and it's apparent on GOES-13 satellite imagery today.

According to Dan Brown, Senior Hurricane Forecaster at the National Hurricane Center (NHC), Miami, Fla., "99L seems to be more of a frontal (non-tropical) low now. Chances of development have greatly diminished."

The NHC noted that the low is about 1,000 miles east-southeast of Bermuda and it continues to show more characteristics of a front. In an infrared image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite at 6:45 a.m. EST most of the cloud cover in System 99L appears on the north and east of the center of circulation. The image was created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. where GOES data are made into images and animations.

NHC says that System 99L is likely to strengthen into an extra-tropical cyclone and produce gusty winds as it moves to the northeast over the next couple of days. It now has just a 10 percent chance of development, down from 60 percent yesterday. One day makes a big difference in the life of a tropical cyclone.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/, Greenbelt, Md.



November 21, 2011

GOES-13 captured this image of System 99L at 10:45 a.m. EST. › View larger image
The organization of cloud cover in NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery today confirms that showers and thunderstorms have become more concentrated north and east of the center of System 99L. GOES-13 captured this image at 10:45 a.m. EST.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
System 99L Has a Chance to Become an Atlantic Tropical Depression

While Hurricane Kenneth churns as a late-season cyclone in the eastern Atlantic, a low pressure area in the Atlantic called System 99L is showing signs of organization. Today's NOAA GOES satellite image shows a more organized low pressure area in the central Atlantic.

At 7 a.m. EST, System 99L was located about 875 miles northeast of the Leeward Islands near 27.3 North and 51.7 West. The organization of cloud cover in NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery today confirms that showers and thunderstorms have become more concentrated north and east of the center of the low. GOES-13 captured an image at 10:45 a.m. EST. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center noted that this system has a 60 percent chance of becoming a sub-tropical storm in the next 48 hours as it moves to the north-northeast at 10 to 15 mph. The low is moving into cooler waters, however, which will inhibit its ability to develop, so forecasters are keeping a close eye on it.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/, Greenbelt, Md.