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Hurricane Season 2011: System 97L (Atlantic Ocean/Caribbean Sea)
10.28.11
 
GOES-13 shows Rina between the Yucatan Peninsula and Cuba; System 97L appears as disorganized clouds in the western Caribbean Sea › View larger image
This visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows Hurricane Rina between the Yucatan Peninsula (left) and Cuba (right). The much weaker low pressure area called System 97L appears as an area of disorganized clouds in the western Caribbean Sea, east of Honduras and Nicaragua.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
GOES-13 Satellite Image Sees Tropical Depression Rina Pop into the Gulf, 97L Behind

Tropical Storm Rina is now a depression in the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to be pushed back south into the Caribbean Sea from a strong cold front this weekend. GOES-13 satellite imagery saw a disorganized Rina with low pressure area 97L to its south.

The NOAA GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Rina, on October 28 at 11 a.m. EDT in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Rina's clouds appear as a rounded area, with outflowing clouds extending northeast over Florida. Far to the south, close to where Rina developed is System 97L. That low pressure area appears disorganized as fragmented clouds in the western Caribbean, east of Honduras and Nicaragua. The visible image was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28, Tropical Depression Rina's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kmh). It was about 55 miles (90 km) north-northeast of Cancun, Mexico. That's about 110 miles (175 km) west of Cuba's western edge, near 21.8 North and 86.6 West. All of the watches and warnings in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula have now been dropped.

Rina was moving to the north-northeast near 6 mph (9 kmh) but is expected to turn east then back to the south and return to the Caribbean Sea. A strong cold front moving through the Gulf of Mexico is expected to re-route Rina and keep her away from a Florida landfall.

The National Hurricane Center noted that as Rina turns away from the Gulf of Mexico, it could degenerate into a remnant low pressure area over the weekend.

System 97L is currently located east of Honduras and Nicaragua and is still struggling because of upper-level winds. The low pressure area has disorganized showers and thunderstorms and they appear somewhat scattered on the GOES-13 satellite image. The National Hurricane Center gives this system a 10 percent chance of development over the weekend, as it continues to head west.

Much farther east is another new low pressure area. Located in the eastern Atlantic, about 850 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands, a low is producing showers and thunderstorms. Upper level winds are light, but there's high pressure on the surface, so it only has a 10 percent chance for development over the weekend, just like System 97L.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



October 27, 2011

Visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows Hurricane Rina along the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula (top) and the much weaker low pressure area called System 97L in the western Caribbean Sea › View larger image
This visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows Hurricane Rina along the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula (top) and the much weaker low pressure area called System 97L in the western Caribbean Sea, east of Honduras and Nicaragua.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
System 97L Fizzling in the Caribbean Sea on GOES-13 Satellite Imagery

The low pressure area moving through the Caribbean Sea behind Hurricane Rina doesn't stand much of a chance for survival based on satellite imagery and environmental factors.

NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured a visible image on Oct. 27 at 7:45 a.m. EDT that showed Hurricane Rina along the eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula and the much weaker low pressure area called System 97L in the western Caribbean Sea, east of Honduras and Nicaragua. The visible image was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

System 97L is producing disorganized showers and clouds over the western Caribbean Sea. The area of low pressure is elongated (it's a trough). Because of wind shear and its increasing proximity to land (its moving toward Nicaragua and Honduras) the National Hurricane Center now gives it a "near zero chance" of becoming a tropical cyclone. Despite its chances, System 97L continues to move west between 10 and 15 miles per hour bringing its clouds and disorganized showers with it.

Text credit: Rob Gutro,
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




October 26, 2011

On October 25, when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 97L it collected valuable data on cloud top temperatures. › View larger image
On October 25, when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 97L it collected valuable data on cloud top temperatures. It showed several areas of strong thunderstorms (purple) north and northwest of the center of circulation. The strongest, coldest, highest cloud tops were colder than -63 Fahrenheit.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Elongated System 97L Still Struggling in the Atlantic

A low pressure system named 97L has been in the sights of forecasters this week and it is still struggling to organize into a tropical depression in the central Caribbean Sea today. The low's center of circulation was difficult to pick out in infrared NASA satellite imagery.

On October 25, System 97L was located in the central Caribbean Sea near 12.6 North latitude and 65.3 West longitude. It was between Puerto Rico and Hispaniola to the north and Venezuela to the south. At that time, it had a 10 percent chance of developing into a tropical depression.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 97L on Oct. 25 and collected valuable data on cloud top temperatures. System 97L appeared elongated from west to east on infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies onboard Aqua. AIRS data showed several areas of strong thunderstorms (purple) north and northwest of what is believed to be the center of circulation. The strongest, coldest, highest cloud tops were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

By October 26, not much had changed with the organization of this trough (elongated area of low pressure). Clouds and showers still appeared disorganized on satellite imagery. System 97L continues to move westward between 10 and 15 mph and still has a low (10%) chance of development over the next 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro,
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.