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Hurricane Season 2011: System 95B (Northern Indian Ocean)
05.03.11
 
This visible image of System 95B taken by MODIS  on May 3 shows System 95B as very disorganized. › View larger image
This visible image of System 95B was taken from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 3. System 95B appears very disorganized in the image.
Credit: NRL/NASA
System 95B Appears Disorganized on NASA Satellite Imagery

On May 3, 2011, NASA's Aqua satellite showed the System 95B was still struggling for survival in the Northern Indian Ocean. The system appears very disorganized on visible satellite imagery.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard MODIS captured a visible image of the disorganized low pressure area. The low still has sustained winds near 15 knots (17 mph/28kmh) and has not changed in the last 24 hours. Wind shear continues to affect this system giving it no chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next 24 hours.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






May 2, 2011

On May 2 at 0654 UTC (2:54 a.m. EDT), MODIS showed a disorganized System 95B. › View larger image
On May 2 at 0654 UTC (2:54 a.m. EDT), the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua showed a disorganized System 95B..
Credit: NRL/NASA
System 95B Battered and Broken

Wind shear has taken its toll on the low pressure area known as System 95B over the past weekend. The ragged low pressure area currently sits several hundred miles from Sri Lanka. The system appears to have fallen apart on infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite today.

On May 2 at 0654 UTC (2:54 a.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the low pressure area called System 95B in the Northern Indian Ocean. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard Aqua, captured an infrared image of the low that showed a disorganized storm. Estimated sustained winds have dropped to 15 knots (17 mph/28 kmh) and the estimated minimum central pressure in the low is near 1010 millibars.

Wind shear has taken its toll on the low pressure area and there is no chance that this low will organize into a tropical cyclone in the next 24 hours.

Currently, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives System 95B a poor chance of development over the next 24 hours.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



April 29, 2011

AIRS infrared image of System 95B was captured on April 29 at 07:53 UTC (3:53 a.m. EDT). › View larger image
This infrared image of System 95B was captured by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on April 29 at 07:53 UTC (3:53 a.m. EDT). The purple areas indicate the strongest convection (thunderstorms) within the low pressure area. The island nation of Sri Lanka is to the west of the system.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Infrared NASA Satellite Data Shows a Struggling Tropical System 95B in Indian Ocean

While the low pressure area known as System 95B is struggling to get organized into a tropical cyclone NASA infrared satellite data is showing some signs of strong convection within.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 95B from its orbit in space and captured an infrared image of the low pressure area on April 29 at 07:53 UTC (3:53 a.m. EDT). Infrared imagery acts like taking the temperature of the system's clouds - and there were some high, very cold clouds that indicated powerful convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) and strong thunderstorms in the center. Some cloud top temperatures were as cold as or colder than -63F/-52 C. Infrared imagery indicated that there was scattered convection around all sides of the low-level center, and even some curved banding of thunderstorms (indicating organization).

On April 29, System 95B was located about 420 nautical miles east-northeast of Colombo, Sri Lanka near 9.5 North and 96.5 East. System 95B is drifting and currently has estimated sustained surface winds between 15 and 20 knots (17-23 mph/28-37kmh). Despite the waters in the Bay of Bengal being warm enough to sustain the development of a tropical cyclone, there is a westerly wind field present.

Currently, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives System 95B a poor chance of development over the next 24 hours.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.