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Hurricane Season 2011: System 94L (Atlantic/Caribbean Ocean)
06.10.11
 
GOES-13 showed System 94L has moved northeast since yesterday and is affecting the Bahamas today. › View larger image
GOES-13 captured an image of System 94L on June 10 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT) That showed System 94L has moved northeast since yesterday and is affecting the Bahamas today.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NASA Sees the Low that Won't Quit: System 94L

The northern Caribbean low pressure area known as System 94L is continually monitored by the GOES-13 Satellite, imagery today shows that it has moved north and is raining on eastern Cuba and the Bahamas.

The National Hurricane Center has resumed noting that this system has a meager chance of developing into a tropical depression. In an update today from NHC, they note that System 94L has a 10 percent chance of developing in the next 48 hours. The chances of development are still low because upper-level winds are strong enough to prevent any organization of the low.

Meanwhile, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured an image of System 94L on June 10 at 1601 UTC (12:01 p.m. EDT).The image was made at the NASA GOES Project out of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. GOES-13 is managed by NOAA.

Today's GOES-13 visible image shows that the system is progressing in a north-northeasterly fashion, although very slowly. Eastern Cuba still had clouds overhead from the system at that time, but Jamaica and much of Hispaniola were now free of them as the low continues to push north. Even south Florida was cloudy yesterday from the northern fringes of the system and today, the low has moved northeast and cleared the area.

Today's forecast for the Bahamas calls for a 60 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms as the low approaches. Forecasts for the path of the low take it on a northeasterly track over the weekend and into the Atlantic Ocean.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 9, 2011

GOES-13 image of System 94L › View larger image
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite taken at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) shows the large, elongated area of low pressure over eastern Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
Stretched Out Low Soaking the Caribbean in GOES-13 Satellite Imagery

GOES-13 satellite imagery on June 9 shows that the pesky low pressure area in the north Caribbean Sea is stretching out and bringing soaking rains to Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and Puerto Rico.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured an image of this low on June 9 at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) System 94L, and the cloud cover appears centered over eastern Cuba and Jamaica while the outer portion of the low stretches over Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and now south Florida. The elongated low has a minimum central pressure of 1001 millibars and is centered near 20 North and 83 West.

During the afternoon of June 9, Flash Flood warnings were in effect in Puerto Rico for the municipalities of Guaynabo, Carolina and San Juan until 4 p.m. AST. According to the National Weather Service website, "at 1:54 p.m. AST National Weather Service doppler radar indicated that heavy rain continues over the warned area and the Piedras River has overflowed its banks and will flood a number of streets." An Urban and Small Stream Flood Advisory is also in effect for many municipalities.

The forecast calls for showers and thunderstorms across western and northwestern Puerto Rico over the next few days. These showers will bring heavy rainfall and local flooding is possible. In addition to Puerto Rico, the rainfall is also now affecting the U.S/U.K. Virgin Islands and Leeward Islands north of 16 North and east of 67 West.

The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the image of today's low pressure area. The NASA GOES Project also creates animations of GOES satellite imagery and that can be found at: http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

System 94L continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms that are bringing heavy rainfall to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Cuba. The low is expected to slowly move northeast.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 8, 2011

GOES image showing the large, elongated area of low pressure over eastern Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. › View larger image
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite taken at 1632 UTC (12:32 p.m. EDT) shows the large, elongated area of low pressure over eastern Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters
GOES-13 Satellite Shows System 94L Elongating, Weakening, Soaking

Whenever a low pressure system starts to stretch out, it loses its power. That's what satellite imagery from the GOES-13 satellite revealed today about the low pressure area plaguing the northwestern Caribbean.

System 94L appears elongated on visible imagery captured today from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13. In an image taken at 1632 UTC (12:32 p.m. EDT) System 94L appears as an elongated area of low pressure over eastern Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola bringing all of them soaking rains.

The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the image of today's elongated low pressure area. The NASA GOES Project also creates animations of GOES satellite imagery and that can be found at: http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

System 94L is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms that are bringing heavy rainfall to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Cuba. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that flash flooding and mudslides from heavy rainfall are possible in those places. What's even more disconcerting is that System 94L has nothing to push it, and it will continue to drift northward and dump even more rainfall.

Currently the NHC gives System 94L a "near zero percent" chance of developing into a tropical depression, because of upper-level winds that continue to batter it, and elongate the system even more.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 7, 2011

System 94L's strongest storms (purple) were over eastern Cuba and eastern Jamaica on June 7. › View larger image
This infrared image from NASA's AIRS instrument was taken from the Aqua satellite on June 7 at 7:05 UTC (3:05 a.m. EDT). The blue and purple indicate cold cloud tops of thunderstorms. Notice how scattered they appear. The strongest storms (purple) were over eastern Cuba and eastern Jamaica at this time.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
TRMM analyzed the rainfall rates within System 94L and noticed that the majority of rainfall was light to moderate. › View larger image
TRMM analyzed the rainfall rates within System 94L on June 5 at 1559 UTC (1:59 p.m. EDT) and noticed that the majority of rainfall was light to moderate (yellow and green) with some isolated areas of heavy rainfall (red).
Credit: SSAI/NASA Goddard, Hal Pierce
NASA Satellites Show System 94L Struggling to Survive

Satellite data from NASA's Aqua and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites show that the low pressure area called System 94L in the northwestern Caribbean Sea is still struggling to organize.

On June 7, the center of the low was about 100 miles south-southwest of Grand Cayman island.

An infrared image from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument was taken from the Aqua satellite on June 7 at 7:05 UTC (3:05 a.m. EDT). The thunderstorms appeared very scattered in the image that shows temperature of high cold, thunderstorm cloud tops and the warm sea surface. The strongest storms were over eastern Cuba and eastern Jamaica at that time, and a circulation center of the low was not apparent in the imagery.

TRMM analyzed the rainfall rates within System 94L and noticed some isolated areas of heavy rainfall, where rain was falling at about 2 inches (50 mm) per hour, but the showers and thunderstorms associated with the low have become more scattered and disorganized. Even on June 5 at 1559 UTC (1:59 p.m. EDT) TRMM noticed that the majority of rainfall was light to moderate with some isolated areas of heavy rainfall.

The disorganization can be blamed on upper level winds that are battering circulation center and associated showers and thunderstorms.

Today, the National Hurricane Center gives System 94L a 20 percent chance of development because of the adverse atmospheric conditions and its disorganization.

Even though it appears less likely that System 94L will become a tropical depression, its rainfall will still cause problems for Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Cuba. As the storm system moves slowly in a northerly direction, heavy rainfall may cause flooding and mudslides. The slow movement will only exacerbate the rainfall amounts.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.




June 6, 2011

AIRS showed strong convection (purple) and thunderstorms in various areas of System 94L. › View larger image
Infrared imagery on June 5 at 18:11 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT) from the AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed strong convection (purple) and thunderstorms in various areas of the low pressure area called "System 94L."
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Reveals a Huge "System 94L" Trying to Organize in the Caribbean

A large area of low pressure has been lingering in the southern Caribbean since last week and is being monitored for tropical cyclone development. NASA's Aqua satellite noticed that the showers and thunderstorms associated with the low cover a huge area and there are a lot of strong storms within it.

Infrared imagery on June 5 at 18:11 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard Aqua showed strong convection (rapidly rising air that form the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) in various areas of the low pressure area called "System 94L."

Some of those thunderstorm cloud tops that stretch from Jamaica east to the area south of Puerto Rico are very high and very cold. The strongest cloud top temperatures are as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit / -52 Celsius, which is an indicator of a lot of energy building those high thunderstorms.

The AIRS imagery is about 1700 kilometers (1,056 miles) wide, and the showers and thunderstorms associated with System 94L fill up that track from west to east, making this a huge area of low pressure. Interestingly enough, the National Hurricane Center noted that today, June 6, the area of lowest pressure is located about 130 miles south of Grand Cayman, and separate from the strongest thunderstorms.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that this system has a Medium chance of becoming the Atlantic Ocean season's first tropical storm before the upper level winds start battering it. NHC is planning to send a hurricane hunter into the storm on Tuesday, June 7 to investigate.

In the meantime, those strong thunderstorms on AIRS infrared imagery mean heavy rainfall for Haiti and Jamaica. For a look at the development of System 94L, check out NASA's Hurricane page update on System 93L from last week, when both low pressure areas were in the Caribbean: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2011/h2011_93L.html.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.