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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Depression 26W (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
12.13.11
 
TRMM provided a › View larger image
TRMM provided a "top down" rainfall analysis of Tropical Depression 26W on Dec. 13. Scattered light rain was falling throughout the system (blue) at a rate near .78 inches/20 mm per hour).
Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Fading Rainfall in Tropical Depression 26W

Lighter and more scattered rainfall was seen in Tropical Depression 26W early today when NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed overhead.

TRMM is a satellite that measures rainfall in tropics and is managed by both NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA. When TRMM flew over the fizzling Tropical Depression 26W (TD26W) on Dec. 13 at 0350 UTC (Dec. 12 at 10:50 p.m. EST) most of the rainfall appeared scattered and light (about .78 inches or 20 mm per hour) and there was no circulation center evident on radar imagery.

There were a few high, scattered towering thunderstorms remaining in the system that topped out around 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), however, indicating that the depression still had a little punch left in it. The bulk of the rainfall within TD26W was over the South China Sea and off-shore of southeastern Vietnam.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), TD26W's maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots (29 mph/46 kmh). It was located about 270 miles southeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam near 7.8 North and 110.5 East. TD26W was moving away from Vietnam toward the southwest at 11 knots (12 mph/20 kmh). Strong southerly wind shear is taking its toll on TD26W and it is expected to dissipate in the next day or two in cooler waters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



Dec. 12, 2011

Forecast track for Tropical Depression 26W, according to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. › View larger image
Forecast track for Tropical Depression 26W, according to the forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.
Credit: JTWC
Twenty-sixth Depression Forms in Northwestern Pacific Ocean

The northwestern Pacific is not yet ready to call the tropical cyclone season quits as the twenty-sixth tropical cyclone just formed about 365 miles east of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on Dec. 12, Tropical Cyclone 26W formed as a depression in the South China Sea and was near 9.5 North and 112.8E. Maximum sustained winds were near 30 knots (35 mph/55 kmh), and TC26W is moving to the west near 8 knots (9 mph/14 kmh). The forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Tropical Depression 26W to move west through the South China Sea, south of Vietnam over the next couple of days.

Animated infrared satellite imagery showed that the low-level center of circulation is getting organized and consolidating. There is also banding of thunderstorms around the center, but convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical depression) was weaker this morning. Tropical Depression 26W is dealing with easterly wind shear between 10 and 20 knots 12 to 23 mph / 20 to 37 kmh)which is preventing any strengthening. In fact, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects the wind shear to push the thunderstorms to the west and away from the storm's center, leading to its dissipation over the next several days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.