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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Depression 24W (Western North Pacific Ocean)
11.09.11
 
Tropical Depression 24W at 0610 UTC (1:10 a.m. EST) on Nov. 9th, 2011. › View larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Depression 24W was captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite at 0610 UTC (1:10 a.m. EST) on Nov. 9th, 2011 when it was about 100 nm east of Hue, Vietnam.
Credit: NASA/NRL
NASA's Aqua Satellite Catches a Dying Tropical Depression 24W

Tropical Depression 24W was a short-lived tropical cyclone in the western North Pacific Ocean. It formed on November 8 and by November 9th it was a remnant low pressure area and NASA's Aqua satellite captured its remnants today.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured the disorganized clouds of Tropical Depression 24W's remnants at 0610 UTC (1:10 a.m. EST) on Nov. 9th, 2011 when it was about 100 nm east of Hue, Vietnam.

The last warning on Tropical Depression 24W was issued yesterday, Nov. 8, 2011 by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. At that time, 24W was located about 120 nautical miles east of Hue, Vietnam, and was moving to the northeast near 7 knots (8 mph). The center of circulation was fully exposed to outside winds. On Nov. 8, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite showed cloud top temperatures were warming, which indicates weakening. The higher and colder the cloud tops, the more energy there is within a tropical cyclone.

Increasing vertical wind shear is also battering this storm as its remnants continue moving into the open waters of the western North Pacific today. 24W's remnants are dissipating near the western Philippine Sea.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/, Greenbelt, Md.