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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Depression 8E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
09.02.11
 
This infrared image of the remnants of Tropical Depression 8E shows the coldest clouds and strongest thunderstorms off shore from western Mexico.› View larger image
This infrared image of the remnants of Tropical Depression 8E shows the coldest clouds and strongest thunderstorms (purple) off-shore from western Mexico on Sept. 1 at 4:35 p.m. EDT. It was taken by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Remnants of Pacific's Tropical Depression 8E Still Lingering on NASA Image

An infrared satellite image from NASA today shows that there are still some strong thunderstorms remaining in the remnants of former Tropical Depression 8E near the Mexican coast.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 8E's (TD8E) remnants on Sept. 1 at 4:35 p.m. EDT and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument data showed the coldest clouds and strongest thunderstorms off-shore from southwestern Mexico. The clouds and showers are still disorganized. It continues to move to the northwest at about 10 mph.

At 10:16 a.m. EDT on Sept. 2, local radar in Mexico revealed that the bulk of the precipitation still remained off-shore. The city of Escuinapa and surrounding towns were receiving what appeared to be a finger of rainfall from the remnants while most of the rest of the coastline was rain-free. Escuinapa is a city located at the extreme southern end of the Mexican state of Sinaloa.

The National Hurricane Center noted that it has a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression again over the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


September 01, 2011

This GOES-11 image from Sept. 1 at 9:45 a.m. EDT shows the remnant clouds of Tropical Depression 8E as a rounded swirl of clouds hugging Mexico's southwestern coastline. › View larger
This GOES-11 image from Sept. 1 at 9:45 a.m. EDT shows the remnant clouds of Tropical Depression 8E as a rounded swirl of clouds hugging Mexico's southwestern coastline. The brighter white areas indicate higher, stronger thunderstorms. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Tropical Depression 8E's Remnants Still Hug Mexican Coastline

An infrared satellite look at Tropical Depression 8E along the Mexican coast shows that the storm became more disorganized in the last 24 hours, and is now a remnant low pressure area.

Tropical Depression 08E (TD8E) has weakened to a remnant low pressure system over Mexico. TD 8E's remnants were raining on Manzanillo and Puerto Vallarta at 10 a.m. EDT (7 a.m. PDT) today and the bulk of the heavier rainfall was off-shore.

A NOAA GOES-11 satellite image from Sept. 1 at 9:45 a.m. EDT showed the remnant clouds of Tropical Depression 8E as a rounded swirl of clouds hugging Mexico's southwestern coastline. There were some higher, stronger thunderstorms visible in the infrared image that appeared whiter and brighter than the surrounding clouds. Those higher clouds were around the center of TD8E's circulation. The GOES-11 image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued their last warning for the remnants of TD8E at 11 p.m. EDT on August 31. At that time, it was about 130 miles (209 km) east-southeast of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico near 19.8 North and 103.8 West. Its maximum sustained winds were down to 20 knots (23 mph/37 kmh) and it was moving to the northwest at 10 knots (12 mph/19 kmh).

On the morning of Sept. 1, 2011, TD8E's remnants were still raining on the southwestern coast of Mexico. As much as 4 to 6 inches (10-15cm) of rain are expected over the coastal areas of the states of Guerrero, Michoacan and Colima.

The NHC noted that there's a low chance, just 10 percent, that TD8E will regenerate.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 31, 2011

This GOES-11 image from Aug. 31 at 12:15 p.m. EDT, shows Tropical Depression 8E as a rounded swirl of clouds › View larger image
This GOES-11 image from Aug. 31 at 12:15 p.m. EDT, shows Tropical Depression 8E as a rounded swirl of clouds hugging Mexico's southwestern coastline.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Tropical Depression 8E Forms On Mexican Coastline, Watches Up

The Mexican government has issued a tropical storm watch for the coast of southwestern Mexico from Zihuatanejo to Punta San Telmo as Tropical Storm 8E formed this morning. The GOES-11 satellite captured an image of its rounded clouds hugging this coast this morning, and NASA's TRMM satellite noticed some heavy rainfall in the system yesterday.

Forecasters noticed the depression develop more rounded characteristics on imagery from NOAA's GOES-11 satellite today. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

On Aug. 30, NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite noticed some isolated areas of heavy rainfall within the low pressure area before it organized. Some areas had rainfall rates of 2 inches (50 mm) per hour.

Today, August 31 at 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Depression 8E had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph. It was located just 75 miles (120 km) west-northwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico, near 18.0 North and 102.7 West. It was moving northwest near 7 mph (11 kmh) and is expected to crawl in that direction over the next couple of days, making rainfall a problem for coastal areas.

Tropical Depression 8E is forecast to hug the western Mexico coastline over the next couple of days, and not strengthen because of its proximity to land. It will, however bring heavy rainfall to coastal sections of the Mexican states of Guerrero, Michoacan and Colima. The National Hurricane Center expects 4 to 6 inches with isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches.

The depression is expected to be short-lived because of its interaction with land, and the National Hurricane Center forecasts it to become a remnant low by late Thursday.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.