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Hurricane Season 2011: Tropical Storm 02B (Northern Indian Ocean)
10.21.11
 
A 3-D slice through tropical cyclone 02B with TRMM Precipitation Radar data revealed it contained heavy rainfall (red). › View larger image
A 3-D slice through tropical cyclone 02B with TRMM Precipitation Radar data revealed it contained heavy rainfall (red). Some thunderstorms in the area of the cross-section were also shown to reach to heights of over 16 km (~9.94 miles).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
The TRMM satellite noticed areas of heavy rainfall (2 inches/50 mm/hr - seen in red) in Tropical Storm 02B. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite noticed areas of heavy rainfall (2 inches/50 mm/hr - seen in red) in Tropical Storm 02B. Light to moderate rainfall (green and blue) around much of the storm was falling at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM Spotted Heavy Rain in a 3-D Image of Tropical Storm 02B

Heavy rain and high towering thunderstorms were all part of Tropical Storm 02B as it moved from the Bay of Bengal over southern Bangladesh and northern Burma this week, according to rainfall data from NASA's TRMM satellite.

The accurate measurement of the tropical rainfall around the globe is one of the main objectives of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The TRMM satellite has also proven useful for global monitoring of tropical cyclone development. TRMM is operated and managed by both NASA and the Japanese Space Agency.

The TRMM satellite passed over tropical cyclone 02B in the eastern Bay of Bengal on October 19, 2011 at 23:40 UTC (7:40 p.m. EDT). The rainfall analysis that was made from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data showed moderate to heavy rainfall associated with 02B was extending northeastward from the eastern Bay of Bengal into Burma (Myanmar).

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) has frequently been used to gather high resolution three-dimensional maps of rain within tropical cyclones. A 3-D slice through tropical cyclone 02B with TRMM Precipitation Radar data revealed it contained radar reflectivity values of over 45 dBZ. High reflectivity values like this indicate that heavy rainfall was occurring at that location. Some thunderstorms in the area of the cross-section were also shown to reach to heights of over 16 km (~9.94 miles).

The India Meteorological Department reported that 02B had weakened to a remnant low pressure area over Myanmar, Bangladesh and Mizoram by October 20.

Text credit: Hal Pierce,
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.








October 20, 2011

Infrared image of Tropical Storm 02B taken by AIRS on Oct. 19 at 3:35 p.m. EDT after it had made landfall. › View larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Storm 02B was taken from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 19 at 3:35 p.m. EDT after it had made landfall in southern Bangladesh. The purple areas indicate high, cold, strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Infrared NASA Data Shows Areas of Heavy Rainfall at Tropical Storm 02B's Landfall

After Tropical Storm 02B made landfall in southern Bangladesh yesterday, October 19, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an infrared snapshot of its clouds revealing areas of strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall. storm.

On Oct. 19 at 8 a.m. EDT the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their last advisory on 02B, noting that it was about 60 nautical miles south-southeast of Chittagong, Bangladesh. That put the center near 21.4 North and 92.1 East. Tropical Storm 02B continued to move in a northeasterly track and NASA's Aqua satellite captured it later in the day.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite read the temperatures of Tropical Storm 02B's clouds on Oct. 19 at 3:35 p.m. EDT after it had made landfall in southern Bangladesh. The AIRS data showed that the highest, coldest, strongest thunderstorms with heavy rainfall stretched from the Bay of Bengal inland along the Bangladesh/Burma (Myanmar) border. Some of those cloud top temperatures exceeded -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius), indicating that they were very high in the troposphere.

The cloud tops warmed, and cloud heights dropped quickly as the storm weakened. Tropical Cyclone 02B has since dissipated.

Text credit: Rob Gutro,
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



October 19, 2011

This visible image of Tropical Cyclone 02B was captured by NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 19 at 04:25 UTC. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Cyclone 02B was captured by NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 19 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT) when it was over Burma (Myanmar).
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone 02B Make Quick Landfall in Southern Bangladesh

Tropical Cyclone 02B formed quickly near the northwestern coast of Bangladesh, and was captured by NASA's Terra satellite just before it made landfall today.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone 02B (TC02B) today, Oct. 19 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT) when it was over Burma (Myanmar). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of its clouds, which extended from Burma to Bangladesh and western India.

By 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 19, TC02B had made landfall in extreme southwestern Bangladesh, about 60 nautical miles south-southeast of Chittagong, Bangladesh. That's near 21.7 North and 92.3 East. Chittagong is a city of over 4.5 million people located in southeastern Bangladesh on the banks of the Karnaphuli River. It is also Bangladesh's busiest seaport. Tropical Cyclone 02B has maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph) and is moving further inland to the northeast at 9 knots (11 mph).

Infrared satellite imagery revealed that TC02B has already begun weakening. The strongest convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) and strongest thunderstorms with heaviest rainfall is now east of the center of circulation. That means that westerly wind shear (20 to 30 knots) is pushing the strongest storms to the east of the center.

TC02B is expected to continue weakening while tracking to the northeast along the Burma/India border. That region can expect heavy downpours, local flooding and gusty winds from Tropical Cyclone 02B.

Text credit: Rob Gutro,
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.