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Hurricane Season 2010: Western Caribbean Low (Atlantic Ocean/Caribbean Sea)
11.22.10
 
November 22, 2010

Western Caribbean Low Not Tropical But a Rainmaker in Central America

The western Caribbean low pressure area as it continued moving toward Belize and Guatemala today. › View larger image
GOES-13 captured a visible image of the clouds associated with the western Caribbean low pressure area at 1431 UTC (9:31 a.m. EDT) as it continued moving toward Belize and Guatemala today. Most of the cloud cover associated with the low is to the north and west of the center of circulation.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
The low pressure system in the western Caribbean made landfall this past weekend (Nov 20-21) in Belize, moved inland and dissipated.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD

















November 19, 2010

Western Caribbean Low Not Tropical But a Rainmaker in Central America

The western Caribbean low pressure area as it continued moving toward Belize and Guatemala today. › View larger image
GOES-13 captured a visible image of the clouds associated with the western Caribbean low pressure area at 1431 UTC (9:31 a.m. EDT) as it continued moving toward Belize and Guatemala today. Most of the cloud cover associated with the low is to the north and west of the center of circulation.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
A low pressure area in the western Caribbean Sea still has a slight chance of developing into a tropical depression as it closes in for a landfall, but that's not stopping it from dropping heavy rainfall in Central America today.

The low is forecast to make landfall on the Belize coast today, November 19, and continues to move westward and further inland. Although the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. still gives the system a ten percent chance of developing into a tropical depression, it continues to drop moderate to heavy rainfall over Belize and Guatemala today.

At 1 a.m. EST today, the center of the low was located near Roatan Island, Honduras near 16.9 North and 85.8 West.

By 7 a.m. EST, the weak low pressure area had disorganized showers and thunderstorms. It was centered over the Gulf of Honduras and was moving westward between 5 and 10 mph. It is expected to move inland later today over Belize and Guatemala.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured a visible image of the low's clouds on Nov. 19 at 1431 UTC (9:31 a.m. EDT). The image showed most of the clouds associated with the low were located to the north and west of its center and already over Guatemala and Belize.

At 10:25 a.m. EST on Nov. 19, the Belize Airport in Belize reported heavy rain showers and sustained winds from the southeast near 6 mph. The temperature was 73 degrees Fahrenheit, and the pressure was rising, indicating that the center of the low was moving away from Belize (and farther inland).

Over the weekend, you can watch the low pressure area as it moves inland, through the GOES-13 animation of updated satellite imagery at http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/goescolor/goeseast/hurricane2/movie/latest_ref.mov/. This animation and satellite images are created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The GOES series of satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Even though this low pressure area appears disorganized on satellite data, it could still produce locally heavy rainfall. The National Hurricane Center noted that portions of Belize, Guatemala and the southern Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico could receive locally heavy rainfall over the weekend as the low moves in.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD