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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Phet (Northern Indian Ocean)
06.08.10
 
June 8, 2010

TRMM image of Cyclone Phet > View larger image
This TRMM satellite rainfall estimate map showed Cyclone Phet's heaviest rainfall (600 or more millimeters/23.6 or more inches) occurred over open waters of the Arabian Sea (blue) Northeast Oman received as much as 450 millimeters (17.7 inches), while Pakistan received between 150-300 millimeters/ 5.9-11.8 inches. The colored line indicates storm track and intensity.
Credit: NASA /Jesse Allen
NASA'S TRMM Satellite Provides Rainfall Estimate for Cyclone Phet

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite, known as TRMM is a "flying rain gauge" in space, and can provide rainfall estimates from its position in orbit around the Earth. Data accumulated from TRMM enabled visualizers to create a map of rainfall generated by Cyclone Phet as it marched through the Arabian Sea from May 31 to June 6. The heaviest rainfall occurred over open waters, but Phet dropped very heavy rainfall over parts of Oman and Pakistan.

TRMM satellite rainfall data estimated Cyclone Phet's heaviest rainfall (600 or more millimeters/23.6 or more inches) occurred over open waters of the Arabian Sea. One area of northeast Oman received as much as 450 millimeters (17.7 inches), while Pakistan received between 150-300 millimeters/ 5.9-11.8 inches as Phet made landfall there this past weekend.

NASA's Jesse Allen created a rainfall image is based on data from the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) produced at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The image showed both rainfall amounts and the storm track for Phet from May 31 to June 6, 2010. The MPS analysis estimates rainfall by combining measurements from many satellites and calibrating them using rainfall measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite.

Tropical Cyclone Phet brought not just strong winds but also heavy rains to the Arabian Sea, the Arabian Peninsula, and the coast of Pakistan in late May and early June. Phet reached its greatest intensity off the coast of Oman on June 3. After making landfall in Oman, Phet dissipated somewhat, but remained organized enough to move back over the Arabian Sea toward Pakistan.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md./Michon Scott, NASA's Earth Observatory



June 7, 2010

AIRS image of Phet on June 7, 2010 > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite showed areas of rainfall from Phet's remnants (blue) over inland Pakistan and India's Rajasthan desert area (far right) on June 7 at 8:41 UTC (4:41 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Depression Phet Now Inland Over Pakistan and India

Tropical Cyclone Phet made its second and final landfall on Sunday, June 6 along coastal Pakistan bringing heavy rainfall, floods, and damages. By June 7, NASA satellite imagery confirmed that the remnants of Phet were still raining over inland areas of Pakistan and India.

Phet affected thousands of people living along coastal areas of Pakistan when it made landfall. Gwadar, on the southwestern coast of Pakistan reported torrential rainfall, flooding and damages. The coastal highway in Balochistan was washed away from flooding. Reports of damage indicated up to three feet of standing water, power outages and destroyed boats.

On June 6 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final warning on Cyclone Phet. At that time, Phet was still a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (30 knots). It was located about 20 nautical miles southeast of Karachi, Pakistan, near 24.6 North and 67.3 East. Phet continued to track northeast.

Infrared satellite data on June 7 at 4:41 EDT from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, showed areas of rainfall from Phet's remnants over inland Pakistan and India's Rajasthan desert area. The system is expected to dissipate over the next day or two.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 4, 2010

MODIS sees Phet > View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on June 4 at 06:40 UTC (2:40 a.m. EDT) showed the lack of an eye, indicating that the storm had weakened after making landfall in Oman.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
Cyclone Phet Weakens After Oman Landfall, Headed to Pakistan

Tropical Cyclone Phet made landfall in Oman on June 3 and is now back in the Arabian Sea and headed toward a second landfall in Pakistan this weekend. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites have captured infrared and visible views of the storm.

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on June 4 at 06:40 UTC (2:40 a.m. EDT) that showed the lack of an eye, indicating that the storm had weakened after making landfall in Oman.

Shortly after Terra flew over Phet, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overheard and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard captured an infrared image of Cyclone Phet at 0947 UTC (5:47 a.m. EDT). The image showed that Phet''s center of circulation was leaving the Oman coast at that time. The infrared image also revealed high cold thunderstorms that surround it are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.

When Phet made landfall in Oman on June 3, it caused landslides and floods in the eastern part of the country. After landfall Phet weakened and continued heading in a northeasterly direction up Oman's coast and back into the Arabian Sea. No casualties have been reported.

AIRS sees Phet> View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Cyclone Phet on June 4 at 0947 UTC. The image shows that Phet''s center (yellow circle) was leaving the Oman coast at that time. The high cold thunderstorms that surround the center appear in purple (and are as cold as -63 Fahrenheit). Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
On June 4 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Cyclone Phet's maximum sustained winds were down to 65 knots (74 mph) making it a Category One cyclone on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. That's down from the Category Four cyclone it was before it made landfall yesterday. Phet is now 65 miles southeast of Musqat, Oman, near 22.9 North and 59.5 East. It's moving north-northeast near 6 knots (7 mph). Tropical Storm-force winds extend out to 115 miles from the center, so the storm has grown in size since it made landfall. It's now 230 miles in diameter.

Phet is still creating dangerous surf in the Arabian Sea, where waves are 22 feet high. All fishing boats and other water craft have been advised to stay in port.

Phet is forecast to continue moving in a north-northeasterly direction over the weekend, and residents of Pakistan are bracing for the storm's arrival on June 6.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.





June 3, 2010

AIRS satellite captures subtropical storm Phet. › Larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Cyclone Phet on June 3 at 08:59 UTC (4:59 a.m. EDT). The purple in the image indicates strong thunderstorms with high, cold cloud tops as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
TRMM satellite captures rainfall of subtropical storm Phet. › Larger image
The TRMM satellite traveled almost directly above a powerful tropical cyclone called Phet in the Arabian Sea on June 2 at 0140 UTC. This image showed that numerous powerful thunderstorms were imbedded in Phet's well defined eye wall producing very heavy rainfall of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches (red)).Forecast positions as of June 2, are shown in this image.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA Satellites See Monster Cyclone Phet Slamming Northeastern Oman Today

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and Aqua satellites are keeping a close eye on Cyclone Phet, a monster cyclone in the Arabian Sea, now affecting coastal Oman. Cyclone Phet's winds and heavy rains reached Oman's east coast earlier today, June 3.

Authorities in Oman have raised the threat level to orange, and evacuations have already taken place.

Yesterday, when Phet was powering up from a Category three to a Category four cyclone on the Saffir-Simpson scale, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite traveled almost directly above Phet in the Arabian Sea. On June 2 at 0140 UTC (June 1 at 9:40 p.m. EDT) TRMM data showed that numerous powerful thunderstorms were imbedded in Phet's well defined eye wall. They were producing very heavy rainfall of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches). That rainfall is affecting the coast of Oman today.

At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) today, June 3, Cyclone Phet (a Category 4 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale) was located about 275 nautical miles south of Muscat, Oman, near 19.2 North and 59.3 East. Phet's maximum sustained winds were near 115 knots (132 mph) with gusts to 140 knots (161 mph). Phet has moved on a north-northwestward track at 4 knots (5 mph).

Phet is creating extremely dangerous seas along the coast of Oman, with waves as high as 30 feet, so all fishing and other boats have been warned not to venture to sea.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center using animated multispectral imagery noted this morning that the imagery indicates the system has regained a 20-nautical mile wide ragged eye that appeared to wobble as the cyclone underwent a possible eye-wall replacement.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Cyclone Phet on June 3 at 08:59 UTC (4:59 a.m. EDT) in which the western half of the storm was already on top of coastal Oman. It showed a large area of strong thunderstorms with high, cold cloud tops as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.

Phet is in an area of low vertical wind shear. Vertical wind shear means winds blowing at different directions at different levels in the atmosphere that can tear a storm apart. When vertical wind shear is strong, it weakens tropical cyclones. When wind shear is weak, it allows tropical cyclones to maintain or increase intensity.

Water vapor imagery from satellites do indicate that as Phet continues moving through the Arabian Sea, it will encounter dry air, which will help weaken the cyclone. The friction of the storm raking over the Oman coast will also contribute to weakening the cyclone.

After skirting the Oman coast, Phet is expected to swing eastward and make landfall just north of Karachi, Pakistan.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 2, 2010

MODIS image of Tropical Cyclone Phet › Larger image
NASA's MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Phet at 06:55 UTC (2:55 a.m. EDT or 6:55 p.m. local time/Pakistan) on June 2, and indicated the eye is about 12 kilometers (7 miles) in diameter.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
Tropical Cyclone Phet Intensifies, Coastal Oman Bracing for Strong Winds, Heavy Rains

Tropical storm Phet intensified over the last 24 hours and has grown into a full-blown and powerful cyclone. NASA's Terra satellite imagery of the storm from earlier today also revealed an eye in the storm, confirming the intensification. Residents of coastal Oman are bracing for strong winds, heavy rainfall and rough surf today and tomorrow.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone Phet at 06:55 UTC (2:55 a.m. EDT or 6:55 p.m. local time/Pakistan). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument, or MODIS captured a visible image of Phet at that time, and noticed an eye in the center of the storm's circulation. Satellite imagery indicates the eye is about 12 kilometers (7 miles) in diameter.

At 0900 UTC (9 p.m. local time/Pakistan), Tropical Cyclone Phet had maximum sustained winds near 110 knots (126 mph) with gusts to 135 knots (155 mph). It is now considered a major cyclone (equivalent to a Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale). It is about 560 miles southwest of Karachi, Pakistan, near 17.7 North and 60.6 East. It is moving to the northwest near 5 knots (6 mph). Cyclone-force winds extend to 35 miles from the storm's center, while tropical-storm force winds extend as far as 75 miles from the center. It is creating very rough seas on the Arabian Sea with waves as high as 18 feet.

Cyclone Phet is a threat to coastal Oman, India (Gujarat), and Pakistan (Sindh and Balochistan). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) has forecast the storm to continue intensifying and to approach Oman on its way to a weekend landfall in southeastern Pakistan between Karachi and to the border with India.

RSMC New Delhi warns that gale force winds will be experienced along the Oman coast today and tomorrow as Phet continues to move through the Arabian Sea.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



June 1, 2010

AIRS satellite captures subtropical storm Joel. › Larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Phet on June 1 at 9:11 UTC (5:11 EDT) and captured this infrared image of the cloud top temperatures. The purple color indicates high, cold cloud tops, as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit, indicating strong convection.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Cyclone Phet Threatens the Indian and Pakistani Coastlines

NASA satellite imagery confirmed that Tropical cyclone 03A has intensified quickly in the last 24 hours, and as a result, the storm has been renamed Tropical Storm Phet. Phet is located in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean, and is threatening the Indian and Pakistani coastlines.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Phet on June 1 at 9:11 UTC (5:11 EDT) and captured an infrared image of the cloud top temperatures. The image indicated large areas of high, cold cloud tops, as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit, indicating strong convection.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on June 1, Tropical Storm Phet had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (62 mph) with higher gusts. Phet was located about 550 miles south-southwest of Karachi, Pakistan, near 16.8 North and 62.2 East. Phet is moving to the northwest near 6 knots (7 mph).

Current landmasses threatened by Phet include: India (Gujarat), Pakistan (Sindh and Balochistan).

Phet is forecast to continue strengthening and turn northeast later this week. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts landfall by the end of the week in the border area between India and Pakistan.

Regional warnings are already in effect for the Indian and Pakistani coastlines from Thursday on. The Indian Meteorological Department's Regional Specialized Meteorological Center noted on June 1, "Under the influence of this system, fairly widespread rainfall with isolated heavy to very heavy falls would commence over coastal areas of Gujarat from June 3 and increase thereafter. Squally winds with speed reaching 55-65 kmph (34-40 mph) (with higher gusts) would commence along and off Gujarat coast from June 2 and increase gradually." For updated forecasts, visit: www.imd.gov.in

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.