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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Omeka (Central Pacific Ocean)
12.22.10
 
December 22, 2010

Omeka Now a Remnant Low

AIRS instrument captured an infrared image Omeka's cold cloud tops (blue), which warmed since the day before. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Omeka (right) on Dec. 20 at 13:47 UTC (8:47 a.m. EST) and the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm's cold cloud tops (blue), which warmed since the day before. Cloud top temperatures were warmer than -63 Fahrenheit indicating that there were no strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in the system.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Omeka has gone down into history as the first December tropical storm in the Central Pacific since 1997. It was north of the main Hawaiian islands and downgraded to a "remnant low" on the evening of Dec. 21 by the National Weather Service (NWS). Omeka's remants aren't going to cause any trouble for the Hawaiian islands, but a larger frontal system will bring rain to the islands through Christmas.

The NWS issued a Flash Flood Watch into the night-time hours for the Hawaiian Islands as a moist and unstable atmosphere will linger over the islands creating downpours and a threat for flash flooding.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD











December 21, 2010

NASA's Infrared Imagery Sees Tropical Storm Omeka Losing its Punch

AIRS instrument captured an infrared image Omeka's cold cloud tops (blue), which warmed since the day before. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Omeka (right) on Dec. 20 at 13:47 UTC (8:47 a.m. EST) and the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm's cold cloud tops (blue), which warmed since the day before. Cloud top temperatures were warmer than -63 Fahrenheit indicating that there were no strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in the system.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Increased wind shear is taking the winds out of Tropical Storm Omeka's sails, or tearing the storm apart and preventing convection that helps power the storm. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that cloud top temperatures have warmed in the storm, indicating that it's losing its punch.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Omeka on Dec. 20 at 13:47 UTC (8:47 a.m. EST) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of the storm's cold cloud tops. The strongest thunderstorms were located about 50 nautical miles northeast of the exposed low-level center of circulation, indicating that the wind shear was strong from the southwest. Satellite data also shows that the cloud tops on Dec. 21 have warmed since the AIRS image. Cloud top temperatures were warmer than -63 Fahrenheit indicating that there were no strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in the system.

On Dec. 21 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final warning on Tropical Storm Omeka. At that time, Omeka's maximum sustained winds were near 39 mph, making it a minimal tropical storm. It was located just east of Lisianski Island and bringing intermittent heavy rainfall and gusty winds there. Lisianski Island is one of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Honolulu is located 905 nautical miles away, to the southeast of Lisianski Island.

Omeka's center is also 280 miles east-southeast of Midway Island near 26.2N and 173.4W. Omeka was moving north-northeast at 18 mph and conditions on Lisianski Island and atolls should improve later in the day on Tuesday.

Wind shear is taking its toll on the system and it is expected to weaken to a tropical depression or be absorbed by another extratropical system once it moves into colder waters to the north.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



December 20, 2010

GOES-11 Sees Central Pacific Unwrap a Rare Tropical Storm: Omeka

Tropical Storm Omeka to the west of a stream of clouds (along a front) in the Pacific. › View larger image
The GOES-11 satellite data was used to create a full-disk image of the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean on Dec. 20 and this image from 1200 UTC (7 a.m. EST) shows Tropical Storm Omeka to the west of a stream of clouds (along a front) in the Pacific.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
The Central Pacific now has unwrapped their first tropical storm since 1997. Tropical Storm Omeka formed in the Central Pacific Ocean near the International Dateline and the GOES-11 satellite captured an image of it today.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-11 is stationary over the western U.S. and provides imagery of that half of the country in addition to visible and infrared images of the eastern and central Pacific Oceans. Satellite data was used to create a full-disk image of the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean on Dec. 20 at 1200 UTC (7 a.m. EST) at the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The image showed Tropical Storm Omeka to the west of a large area of clouds along a frontal boundary in the Pacific. GOES satellites are managed by NOAA.

Tropical storm Omeka, also known as 01C (for Central), was born this morning, December 20 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST). It has maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph) and was moving northeast at 14 mph. It is located about 505 miles south of Midway Island near 20.9 North and 178.2 West. That's about 1,200 miles west of Kauai, Hawaii. Omeka is no threat to land areas as it continues to spin through the Central Pacific.

In December, tropical systems have formed in the central Pacific but it’s a rare occurrence. The last time it happened was 13 years ago in 1997 when Typhoon Paka formed. Omeka is different than Paka, however, because Omeka came from an extra-tropical low that was near 35 degrees north latitude about a week ago and became tropical. The broadness of the feature has far reaching affects, as far as 1200 miles away.

Omeka is forecast to move north into harsh atmospheric conditions (strong wind shear) that are expected to weaken it and cause its dissipation within a couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD