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Tropical Storm Meranti (Northwestern Pacific)
09.10.10
 
September 10 , 2010

NASA Satellites See Typhoon Meranti Make Landfall in China

Most of the rain falling within Meranti was moderate, falling at a rate between 20 and 40 millimeters per hour. › View larger image
Meranti on Sept. 9 at 1155 UTC (7:55 a.m. EDT) and noticed most of the rain falling within the tropical storm was moderate, falling at a rate between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. However, there were some areas of rainfall in northwest Taiwan and around Meranti's center with heavy rainfall at up to 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Tropical Storm Meranti over Taiwan captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on Sept. 9. › View larger image
This visible image of Tropical Storm Meranti (11W) over Taiwan was captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite on Sept. 9 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Terra satellites captured views of Typhoon Meranti's rainfall and clouds as it was making landfall in China early Friday morning, Sept. 10. Meranti powered up to Category One typhoon status just before it made landfall and quickly weakened back to a tropical storm.

Meranti made landfall at Shishi City, which is located in the province of Fujian in southeastern China. Maximum sustained winds at the time of landfall were near 78 mph, making Meranti a Typhoon at the time. It has since weakened back into a tropical storm as it moves inland. It was the tenth typhoon to impact China this season.

TRMM is managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA, and provides data on the rates in which rain falls in tropical cyclones (and other weather systems). TRMM passed over Meranti on Sept. 9 at 1155 UTC (7:55 a.m. EDT) and noticed most of the rain falling within the tropical storm was moderate, falling at a rate between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. However, there were some areas of rainfall in northwest Taiwan and around Meranti's center with heavy rainfall at up to 2 inches per hour.

Ground observations indicated that Meranti dumped as much as 88 mm (3.5 inches) of rain to Shishi City where it made landfall. Heavy rainfall and gusty winds were also experienced in the neighboring Zhejiang Province. Meranti is forecast to continue weakening as it moves inland.

About 6 hours before TRMM investigated Meranti's rainfall, NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Meranti's extensive cloud cover over Taiwan, the Taiwan Strait and back into the South China Sea. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard Terra captured the image at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT).

For more information about how TRMM looks at rainfall, visit NASA's TRMM website at: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.






September 09, 2010

Huge Tropical Storm Meranti Approaching the Taiwan Strait for a China Landfall

Tropical Storm Meranti as it stretched from the Taiwan Strait far southwest to Hainan Island. › View larger image
NASA's infrared AIRS instrument imagery of Tropical Storm Meranti (formerly 11W) showed its huge size as it stretched from the Taiwan Strait far southwest to Hainan Island, China on Sept. 9 at 0529 UTC (1:29 a.m. EDT or 1:29 p.m. local time -Taiwan). There was a lot of strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall (purple) throughout this large storm.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm 11W has been given the name Meranti, just in time for a landfall in China sometime late tonight Eastern Time/early Sept. 10 local time. NASA infrared imagery showed that the storm is so large it stretches from the Taiwan Strait (where its central circulation is located) southwest to Hainan Island, China.

Tropical Storm Meranti's maximum sustained winds were near 52 mph at 5 a.m. EDT today, September 9 (5 p.m. local time/China). It was located approximately 210 nautical miles southwest of Taipei, Taiwan near 22.5 North and 119.2 East. Meranti is moving north at 10 mph. Meranti is forecast to go into the Taiwan Strait (between Taiwan and China), then turn west for a landfall in mainland China.

NASA's infrared Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an image of Tropical Storm Meranti on Sept. 9 at 0529 UTC (1:29 a.m. EDT). AIRS infrared imagery showed many very high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops at that time, indicating strong convection and heavy rainfall throughout much of this huge system that stretched from the Taiwan Strait far southwest to Hainan Island, China.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery on the morning of Sept. 9 showed a well defined low level circulation center in Meranti, and a NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E instrument microwave image (that also flies on the Aqua satellite) showed deep convective banding around Meranti's eye.

Meranti is moving along the western edge of a low-to-mid-level ridge of high pressure and is expected to make landfall over southeastern China in 24 hours. Meranti is expected to dissipate over China's mountainous terrain quickly thereafter.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 08, 2010

Eleventh Tropical Depression Forms in Northwestern Pacific

infrared image of tropical depression 11W › View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression 11W's cold clouds on Sept. 8 at 0447 UTC (12:47 a.m. EDT) northeast of the northern Philippines. The strongest storms appear in purple.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
The Northwestern Pacific Ocean is still keeping up with the Eastern Pacific in the number of tropical cyclones it generates this season, as the 11th tropical cyclone of the season formed on Sept 8. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the storm's cloud tops revealing strong convection and thunderstorms around the center of circulation.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of then Tropical Depression 11W's cold clouds on Sept. 8 at 0447 UTC (12:47 a.m. EDT) northeast of the northern Philippines. The strongest storms appeared in the center of circulation. After the AIRS image was captured, Tropical Depression 11W sped westward and entered the South China Sea.

By 1500 UTC on Sept. 8, Tropical Depression 11W had already strengthened into a tropical storm. It had maximum sustained winds near 46 mph and was moving west near 9 mph. 11W was about 305 miles east-southeast of Hong Kong, China near 20.8 North and 119.4 West.

Infrared satellite imagery during the late morning hours (EDT) indicated that Tropical Storm 11W's low-level circulation center was partially exposed (to outside winds that could weaken it). Infrared imagery also showed that the strong convection was mostly occurring south of the center of circulation.

Tropical Storm 11W is encountering wind shear and is expected to weaken before it makes landfall in China on September 10, north of Hong Kong.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.