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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Malou (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
09.07.10
 
September 7, 2010

NASA's MODIS Imagery Shows a Large Tropical Storm Malou Moving into Sea of Japan

Tropical Storm Malou's progress through the Korea Strait and into the Sea of Japan on Sept. 6 (left) to Sept. 7 (right). > View larger image
These two images of Tropical Storm Malou show its progress northeastward through the Korea Strait and into the Sea of Japan on Sept. 6 (left) to Sept. 7 (right). The images were captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, and show Malou's cloud cover extends from South Korea (left) over southern Japan (right).
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer known as the MODIS instrument flies on NASA's Aqua satellite and has been keeping up with Tropical Storm Malou's march into the Sea of Japan this weekend, and Malou is headed for a landfall later today in Japan.

MODIS captured two images of Tropical Storm Malou as it moved northeastward through the Korea Strait and into the Sea of Japan on Sept. 6 and Sept. 7. The images showed Malou's large cloud cover extended from South Korea (to the west) over southern Japan (to the east). Malou is barely hanging onto tropical storm strength today, September 7, with maximum sustained winds near 39 mph. It is located near 35.5 North and 133.0 East, about 190 nautical miles west of Kyoto, Japan.

Animated infrared satellite imagery indicates that Malou continues to undergo extra-tropical transition as its strongest convection is now northeast of the low-level circulation center because of wind shear.

It is moving east-northeast at 18 mph and will continue on that track, remaining over open waters of the Sea of Japan until a landfall in southern Honshu later today. Thereafter it will move into the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as a weak extratropical low pressure area.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 3, 2010

Two Tens in the Pacific Ocean: NASA Sees Malou Form

AIRS captured this visible image of Malou on Sept. 2, and it appears as a comma shape. > View larger image
The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Malou on Sept. 2, and it appears as a comma shape.
Credit:
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
The Pacific Ocean seems to be developing the same number of tropical depressions at the same time in both the Eastern and Western North Pacific Ocean, and this week is another confirmation of that. NASA's Aqua satellite spied Tropical Depression 10E form in the Eastern Pacific yesterday, and Tropical Depression 10W form in the Western Pacific that same day.

Tropical Depression 10W in the Western Pacific, however, had a little more punch as it strengthened into Tropical Storm Malou today. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead early on Sept. 2 and revealed a large area of strong convection (high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops) north, west and south of the center of circulation. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that captured that data also captured a visible image, which showed Malou as a comma shape.

At 5 a.m. EDT on September 3, Tropical storm Malou had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph. It was located about 235 miles southeast of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 23.8 North and 131.2 East. It was moving west-northwest near 21 mph and will bring gusty winds and rain to Kadena Air Base this weekend.

The system is forecast to slowly strengthen but is not expected to become a typhoon because wind shear will begin to weaken it over the weekend. It is expected to move into the Yellow Sea early next week.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.