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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Lionrock (Western Pacific)
09.02.10
 
September 2, 2010

Lionrock infrared image AIRS infrared image taken Sept. 2 at 0523 UTC (1:239 a.m. EDT) showed that Lionrock was over China and still had some cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) around the center of circulation. Those clouds reached so high into the troposphere that they were colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Lionrock Tamed by China, Quietly Roars

Tropical Storm Lionrock is quietly roaring into oblivion. The tropical storm made landfall in eastern China on September 1 at 2300 UTC (7 p.m. EDT) and is now dissipating. NASA infrared satellite data from early this morning shows a small area of strong thunderstorms remain in Lionrock's center as it moves inland.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Lionrock just after landfall. The image was taken on Sept. 2 at 0523 UTC (1:23 a.m. EDT) and showed that Lionrock was over China and still had some cold thunderstorm cloud tops around the center of circulation. Those clouds reached so high into the troposphere that they were colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit and are indicative of strong storms. So, Lionrock made landfall with a roar, but in the next 24 hours it will dissipate and roar no more.

At 0300 UTC on September 2 (11 p.m. EDT, Sept. 1), Lionrock was about 210 nautical miles east-northeast of Hong Kong, on the coast of southeastern China near 24.2 North and 117.1 East. It was moving northeast near 10 mph. The infrared imagery captured by NASA's AIRS instrument two hours later did show some thunderstorms wrapped in bands around Lionrock's center. However, the interaction with land is taming this Lionrock very quickly. Lionrock should dissipate by the end of the day on September 3.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 11, 2010

Tropical Storm Lionrock approaching landfall in southeast China on Aug. 31 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT). > View larger image
This infrared image from NASA's AIRS instrument onboard the Aqua satellite shows Tropical Storm Lionrock approaching landfall in southeast China on Aug. 31 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT). There were still some high thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) indicating strong convection, and cloud tops as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Lionrock Roars for China Landfall

NASA satellite data captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Lionrock in the South China Sea on August 31 and it appeared to be elongating, indicating the storm was weakening. It is roaring for a landfall later today in southeastern China.

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flies onboard the Aqua satellite and captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Lionrock on August 31 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT). Despite that the image showed the storm elongated from west to east, AIRS revealed that there was some strong convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power tropical cyclones) throughout the storm, indicating there is still some punch left in Lionrock. Since that time, convection has decreased in the storm.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT) on September 1, Lionrock had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (56 mph) and was moving west at 9 mph. It was centered about 100 miles west-northwest of Kaoshiung, Taiwan near 23.1 North and 118.5 East. Lionrock was generating 20-foot high seas in the South China Sea. Lionrock's close proximity to land is already affecting the storm and weakening it as it continues to move west for a landfall later today in the vicinity of the cities of Chaozhou and Shantou in southeastern China later today. The forecast for Chaozhou calls for heavy rain today and severe thunderstorms tonight as Lionrock approaches. Lionrock is anticipated to dissipate sometime on Friday, September 4 over land.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 31, 2010

Lionrock had high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) indicating strong convection. > View larger image
The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image on August 30 at 1:05 p.m. EDT of Tropical Storm Lionrock. Lionrock had high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) indicating strong convection.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
The Terra captured TS Lionrock (lower left), TS Namtheun (center), and Typhoon Kompasu (top right) off the Asian coast. > View larger image
NASA's Terra satellite flew over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean at 02:30 UTC on August 31 (10:30 p.m. EDT Aug. 30) and captured Tropical Storm Lionrock (lower left), Tropical Storm Namtheun (center), and Typhoon Kompasu (top right) off the Asian coast.
Credit: NASA/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA's Terra Satellite Captures Three Tropical Cyclones in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

NASA's Terra satellite flew over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean at 10:30 p.m. EDT Aug. 30 and captured Tropical Storm Lionrock, Tropical Storm Namtheun, and Typhoon Kompasu in one incredible image. Two of these tropical cyclones are expected to merge, while the other is headed for a landfall in China.

On August 31, at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Kompasu had maximum sustained winds near 109 mph and is 45 nm east-southeast of Kadena AB, Japan. The cyclone will track over Okinawa within the next few hours and continue on a northwestward track for the next 12 to 24 hours, then cross the Korean Peninsula (from western to eastern Korea) into the Sea of Japan, cross northern Japan and exit into the Northwestern Pacific Ocean by September 4.

When the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies on Terra captured the image of all three storms the center of circulation was apparent in Tropical Storm Namtheun, and the eye was visible in Typhoon Kompasu, although some high clouds were filling in the center.

At 1 a.m. EDT, Kadena Air Base wasn't reporting tropical storm force winds from Typhoon Kompasu yet. Kadena Air Base is a United States Air Force base located in the towns of Kadena and Chatan and the city of Okinawa, in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Kadena Air Base is the hub of U.S. airpower in the Pacific, and home to the USAF's 18th Wing and a variety of associate units. Kadena Air Base did report, however, that sea level pressure dropped and amazing 44 millibars in less than 2 hours, indicating the Typhoon was approaching.

After impacting Kadena Air Base, Typhoon Kompasu is expected to turn north, then northeast and track over the Korean Peninsula and into the Sea of Japan

The other two tropical cyclones, Tropical Storm Lionrock and Tropical Storm Namtheun, are forecast to merge in the next day or two. NASA satellite data show that the two storms are in close proximity of each other. On August 31 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Lionrock, formerly Tropical Depression 07W, had maximum sustained winds near 57 mph. It was located about 195 nm southwest of Kaohsiung, Taiwan and it is forecast to merge with Tropical Storm Namtheun (formerly Tropical Depression 09W). Lionrock has moved east-northeastward at 2 mph. Infrared satellite imagery, such as that from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite was showing a decrease in convection in the storm's center. By mid-day (Eastern Time) on Thursday, Lionrock should make the merge with Namtheun and turn northwestward. It is expected to make landfall in eastern China late on Thursday, September 2 and dissipate.

On August 31 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Namtheun was about 80 nautical miles west of Taipei, Taiwan and moving west-southwestward at 8 mph. Its winds were sustained near 39 mph, so it was just at the threshold for being a tropical storm. The storm's low level center is partially exposed because of an upper level trough (elongated area of low pressure) to its north causing wind shear. Despite this, Namtheun is expected to remain the dominant circulation when it merges with Lionrock.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



August 27, 2010

This image of 07W taken by AIRS showed strong convection and thunderstorms in the cyclone (purple) as cold as -63F. > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over 07W on August 27 at 05:59 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT) and the infrared image taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder showed some strong convection and high, cold thunderstorms in the cyclone (purple) as cold as -63F.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Catches a "Slice" of Tropical Depression 07W in South China Sea

Tropical depression 07W formed during the early morning hours of August 27 (Eastern Time) and NASA's Aqua satellite was there to commemorate its birth. Aqua captured an infrared image of the depression that looked more like a slice of pie than a tropical cyclone.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over 07W on August 27 at 05:59 UTC (1:59 a.m. EDT). The infrared image taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the satellite captured that showed cold cloud temperatures and warm sea surface temperatures showed that Tropical Depression 07W (TD07W) was an elongated area of clouds. Some of the cloud tops appeared to be very high with temperatures as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit, indicating strong uplift (rising air that condenses and forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone). That data gives forecasters that clue that TD07W may be strengthening and getting organized.

At 0900 GMT (5 a.m. EDT) on August 27, Tropical Depression 07W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34 mph), and over the weekend is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm. It was located about 200 miles west of Manila, the Philippines near 15.0 North and 117.4 West. It is generating 8-foot high waves in the South China Sea. It is moving west at 7 mph and is forecast to move to the north.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center is the organization that forecasts tropical cyclones in the North Western Pacific region and they noted in their discussion of 07W on the morning of August 27, "recent animated multi-spectral satellite imagery reveals that over the past six hours (ending at 5 a.m. EDT) Tropical Depression 07W has rapidly developed. A 262218z Windsat (a European satellite) pass and a partial 270122z ASCAT pass indicate a well defined low-level center with 25 knot (28 mph) winds at the system center."

Tropical Depression 07W is in a favorable environment this weekend, which will allow it to intensify. There's low vertical wind shear (less than 17 mph) and warm sea surface temperatures over the 80 degree Fahrenheit threshold that provides fuel for storms to strengthen.

Over the weekend, Tropical Depression 07W will stay over the open waters of the South China Sea and travel northward where forecasters believe it will make landfall somewhere north of Hong Kong early next week.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.