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Hurricane Season 2010: Hurricane Julia (North Atlantic Ocean)
09.21.10
 
September 21, 2010

Hurricane Watches Up in Canada as the GOES-13 Satellite Sees Hurricane Igor Still Expanding

This visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor as he moves into the Canadian Maritimes and Tropical Storm Lisa in the far eastern Atlantic. › View larger image
This visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor from the GOES-13 satellite was captured at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) and shows his huge size (now 706 miles in diameter) as he moves into the Canadian Maritimes (top left). Tropical Storm Lisa is seen in the far eastern Atlantic in the larger image.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
The TRMM satellite captured rainfall occurring in Igor (left) and Julia (right) when it passed over on Sept. 19. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured rainfall occurring in monster Hurricane Igor (left) and fading Tropical Depression Julia (right) when it passed over them on Sept. 19 at 1954 UTC (3:54 p.m. EDT). At that time TRMM showed Igor had a large area of rain drenching Bermuda. Red indicates rainfall of up to 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Hurricane Igor may be changing into an extra tropical storm and losing his warm core of energy, but he hasn't lost his punch as hurricane watches are up today in eastern Canada. The GOES-13 satellite captured a look at Hurricane Igor this morning, and noticed the storm continues to grow larger and part of that expansion is likely a result of absorbing Julia's remnants.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite or GOES-13 is stationary in its position in space, watching over the weather in the eastern U.S. GOES-13 captured a visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) today, Sept. 21 and the image showed Igor's huge size has continued to grow even larger over the last couple of days. Hurricane Igor is now about now 920 miles in diameter!

GOES-13 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and images are created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Igor is quickly losing tropical characteristics today and is transforming from a warm core system to a cold core system, just like typical low pressure systems in the northern hemisphere.

Igor's center was passing near Newfoundland at 11 a.m. EDT morning. As Igor moves north, a hurricane watch is in effect for the coast of Newfoundland from Stones Cove Northward and Eastward to Fogo Island and a Tropical Storm Warning is in Effect for the coast of Newfoundland from Burgeo Northward and Eastward to Triton and the islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon.

Hurricane Igor is maintaining hurricane strength with maximum sustained winds near 75 mph as he continues to track north. Hurricane-force winds extend 85 miles from his center, and tropical-storm force winds extend out to 460 miles, so his diameter has grown to a massive 920 miles!

At 11 a.m. the center of Hurricane Igor was located 35 miles south of Cape Race, Newfoundland, Canada, near 46.2 North and 52.8 West. Based on observations from southeastern Newfoundland this morning, Igor's minimum central pressure was 952 millibars. Igor is moving northeast at 46 mph and is forecast to turn to the north-northeast and then turn north on Wednesday as he continues to move into the cooler waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. Igor is forecast to become a strong extratropical cyclone later in the day.

Additional rainfall accumulations of 1 to 3 inches are possible over eastern Newfoundland today, totaling as much as between 4 and 8 inches of rainfall there from Igor. According to the National Hurricane Center, Canadian buoy 44139 located about 150 miles west of the center reported sustained winds of 62 mph (100 Km/hr) this morning, and Canadian buoy 41138 located just east of the center reported a pressure of 962 millibars.

On Sept. 15, Julia and Igor had both been powerful category four hurricanes but Julia's wind speeds had continued to drop since because of wind shear from monster hurricane Igor's outflow. By 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 20, the National Hurricane Center issued their final warning on Julia. She was 1,100 miles west of the Azores near 34.7 North and 46.4 West and maximum sustained winds were near 46 mph, but quickly weakening. Julia had later been downgraded into a low pressure system and is now in the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season history books. Meanwhile, Igor's life history is not finished as he makes a track further into the North Atlantic Ocean.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 20, 2010

MODIS captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Julia and noticed a large area of Saharan dust  to Julia's east (right). › View larger image
NASA's MODIS instrument on the Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Julia on Sept. 18 at 13:50 UTC (9:50 a.m. EDT) and noticed a large area of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean, to Julia's east (right).
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Tropical Storm Julia Getting "Dusted"

Dust has been blowing into the Eastern Atlantic Ocean from Africa's Saharan Desert, and a NASA satellite captured some of that dust east of Tropical Storm Julia.

NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Julia on Sept. 18 at 13:50 UTC (9:50 a.m. EDT) and noticed a large area of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean, to Julia's east.

On Sept. 20 at 5 a.m. EDT, Julia was still holding on to tropical storm status with maximum sustained winds near 45 mph. Julia was located about 1,165 miles west of the Azores Islands near 35.5 North and 47.9 West. Julia is moving east-northeast near 9 mph and is forecast to speed up. Julia's estimated minimum central pressure is 998 millibars.

In addition to dealing with Saharan dust, Julia is dealing with wind shear created by massive Hurricane Igor far to her west. That westerly wind shear continues to push Julia's strongest convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power her) to the east of Julia's center of circulation. When a tropical cyclone doesn't "stack up" line an upright column, it loses its uniform spin, and tends to weaken.

The National Hurricane Center expects Julia to fade into a remnant low in a day or two. Computer models show two different scenarios after that, as some see Julia could be absorbed in the massive circulation of Hurricane Igor, while others keep Julia separate and becoming extratropical before dissipating over cooler waters.

Meanwhile, as the curtain begins to drop on Julia in the eastern Atlantic, another low pressure system is in the wings to create its own show. There's a low about 400 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands that is showing signs of organization today. It's moving northwestward and has an 80% chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next 48 hours. That low is one that NAA satellites are keeping a close eye on.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 17, 2010

MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured  view of Hurricane Julia › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this view of Hurricane Julia's clouds on Sept. 16 at 1:35 p.m. EDT.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Sees Record-Breaking Julia Being Affected by Igor

Julia is waning in the eastern Atlantic Ocean because of outflow from massive Hurricane Igor, despite his distance far to the west. Satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Julia's eye was no longer visible, a sign that she's weakening.

As NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Hurricane Julia from space on Sept. 16 at 1:35 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm. In the MODIS image, Julia's eye was no longer visible and its center was cloud-filled.

Although Julia is weakening from Hurricane Igor's effects, she still broke a hurricane record in the Atlantic Ocean this week. The National Hurricane Center noted that Julia holds was the most intense hurricane to be so far east in the North Atlantic Ocean, when it was a Category 4 hurricane earlier this week. As of today, however, Julia is down to a Category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17, Hurricane Julia had maximum sustained winds near 85 mph. The center of Hurricane Julia was near latitude 24.2 north and longitude 46.7 west. That's about 1,500 miles southwest of the Azores. The Azores is a Portuguese archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean, about 930 miles west of Lisbon, Portugal and about 2,400 miles east from the U.S. east coast.

Julia is moving toward the west-northwest near 20 mph and is expected to turn to the turn toward the northwest with a decrease in forward speed is expected, followed by a turn north. Julia's estimated minimum central pressure is 981 millibars.

Julia is going to stay at sea, according to the forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. In fact, over the weekend she's expected to make a path in the shape of a boomerang in the eastern Atlantic and track northwest then turn northeast (and keep far away from Bermuda).

The NHC noted that northerly to northwesterly wind shear caused by Hurricane Igor's outflow will be increasing and adversely affecting Julia over the weekend. Hurricane computer forecast models are showing that Julia will be absorbed by the huge circulation of Hurricane Igor after the weekend.

Meanwhile, another area of low pressure has developed off the African coast, and forecasters give this system a 10 percent chance of developing into a tropical depression over the weekend. However, next week may be a different story.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 16, 2010

GOES-13 Sees a Weaker Hurricane Julia in the "Tropical Trio"

Julia's eye is no longer visible. To Julia's east is a plume of dust blowing off the African coast (far right). › View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite captured an amazing visible image of the 3 tropical cyclones at 7:45 a.m. EDT on Sept. 16. Karl is a tightly wound tropical storm (far left) over the Bay of Campeche. In the open waters of the central Atlantic, the massive and powerful Hurricane Igor (center) spins toward Bermuda. Igor's 550 mile cloud cover dwarfs Karl and Hurricane Julia (far right). Julia's eye is no longer visible. To Julia's east is a plume of dust blowing off the African coast (far right).
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
GOES-13 satellite imagery this morning showed the "tropical trio": Tropical Storm Karl over the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Igor in the central Atlantic, and a waning Hurricane Julia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane Julia has now lost her Category 4 Hurricane status, and is currently a Category 2 hurricane in the eastern Atlantic and weakening. Wind shear, cooler sea surface temperatures and warmer cloud top temperatures all spell a weaker Julia.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite known as GOES-13 that monitors weather over the U.S. East Coast and the Atlantic Ocean basin captured an amazing visible image of the three tropical cyclones at 1145 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT).

GOES satellites are operated by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. uses the data from GOES satellites and creates images and animations.

In this morning's GOES-13 image, Karl is a tightly wound tropical storm that appears to be strengthening today over the Bay of Campeche. Farther to the east and in the open waters of the central Atlantic, the massive and powerful Hurricane Igor spins toward Bermuda. Igor is twice as large as Hurricane Julia today as is evident in the GOES-13 image.

Igor's 550 mile cloud cover dwarfs Karl (in the Gulf of Mexico) and Hurricane Julia (which is about 280 miles in diameter) located in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. In the GOES-13 visible image, Julia's eye is no longer visible indicating that the storm has weakened considerably over the last day.

At 5 a.m. EDT today, Sept. 16, Hurricane Julia's maximum sustained winds were near 105 mph. She is centered about 875 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near 21.2 North and 36.2 West. She's moving northwest near 18 mph and her minimum central pressure is 970 millibars.

What is Weakening Hurricane Julia?

Wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures are responsible for Julia's weakening overnight. Wind shear, created by the mid-to-upper level trough (elongated area of low pressure) between Julia and Igor has generated a 20 to 30 knot wind shear over Julia. Those winds, blowing from the southwest are acting to push the main convection (rapidly rising air that creates the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) to the north of Julia's center causing her to weaken.

Whenever the main convection is pushed away from the center of a tropical cyclone, it weakens. Imagine the center of a storm looking like a haystack, and wind shear or strong winds blow the top of the haystack away. That's what's happening with Julia.

Infrared imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Julia's cloud top temperatures are warming today. Yesterday, those cloud top temperatures were colder than -65 degrees Fahrenheit. Today, they are less cold indicating that they're not as high, i.e., the thunderstorms are not as strong. The rule for thunderstorms is that the higher they are, the more powerful they are. When the cloud top heights fall, so does the storm's punch.

In addition, the sea surface temperatures where Julia is now located are between 78 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26-27 Celsius). A tropical cyclone needs sea surface temperatures of at least 80F to maintain intensity. As Julia continues to track to the north, the sea surface temperatures will continue to cool, taking away her fuel. That's why the National Hurricane Center has forecast additional weakening of Julia over the next 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 15, 2010

GOES-13's Family of Tropical Cyclones: Tropical Storm Karl, Hurricanes Igor and Julia

GOES-13 captured an image of Tropical Storm Karl and Hurricanes Igor and Julia in one image on Sept. 15 › View larger image
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
On September 15, three tropical cyclones were active in the Atlantic Ocean basin, two of them powerful Category Four hurricanes on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Karl and Hurricanes Igor and Julia in one image on Sept. 15 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT).

At that time, Tropical Storm Karl (left) was making landfall in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Category 4 Hurricane Igor was spinning in the Atlantic Ocean (center) over 1000 miles southeast of Bermuda, and Category 4 Hurricane Julia trailing to Igor's east (far right) about 600 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

GOES satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates satellite images and animations using GOES satellite data.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



3 NASA Satellites Seek Clues to Hurricane Julia's Rapid Intensification

The heaviest rainfall was located in powerful thunderstorms northwest of Julia's center of circulation. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite noticed concentric rain bands circling Julia's center were dropping heavy rainfall at over 2 inches per hour (red). The heaviest rainfall was located in powerful thunderstorms northwest of Julia's center of circulation. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
This image of Julia shows very strong thunderstorms (purple) around Julia's center. › View larger image
This infrared image of Julia was captured by the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Sept. 15 at 0353 UTC (Sept. 14 at 11:53 p.m. EDT) and doesn't show an eye, which developed later. It does show very strong thunderstorms (purple) around Julia's center where cloud heights were as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit and heavy rain was falling.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
MODIS captured a visible image of Hurricane Julia before her rapid intensification. › View larger image
On Sept. 14 at 8:40 a.m. EDT the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Julia before her rapid intensification. In that image, her eye was cloud-filled.
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
Hurricane Julia intensified rapidly overnight and is now a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale and NASA's Aqua, Terra and TRMM satellites captured clues as they passed over her from space.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over intensifying hurricane Julia during the afternoon of Sept. 14 and captured very heavy rain falling at 1807 UTC (2:07 p.m. EDT). That heavy rainfall was a clue that she would intensify overnight, and today, Sept. 15, she has become a Category Four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale.

TRMM's Precipitation Radar data showed that concentric rain bands circling Julia's center were dropping heavy rainfall at over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches). TRMM showed that the heaviest rainfall was located in powerful thunderstorms northwest of Julia's center of circulation. Julia's wind speeds increased to 115 knots (~132 mph) by early on Wednesday, September 15 making it a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

On Sept. 14 at 12:40 UTC (8:40 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Julia before her rapid intensification. In that image, her eye was cloud-filled. Today Julia has "a clear eye structure with impressive cloud top enhancement," according to the National Hurricane Center which is a clear sign that she strengthened since Terra passed by on Sept. 14.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Julia today, Sept. 15. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard captured an infrared image of Julia at 0353 UTC (Sept. 14 at 11:53 p.m. EDT) and did not yet show an eye, which developed later. It did show very strong thunderstorms around Julia's center where cloud heights were as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit and heavy rain was falling.

At 11 a.m. EDT today, Sept. 15, Julia's maximum sustained winds were near 135 mph. Julia is a much small storm than the monster that Igor has become. Igor's tropical storm-force winds extend out farther than 275 miles from the center, while Julia's extend 115 miles making her less than half the size of Igor.

The outflow from Hurricane Igor and a nearby upper-level low pressure area are combining to produce southerly wind shear over Julia, which is what the National Hurricane Center noted as the reasons her intensity leveled off this morning.

Julia was located about 595 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near latitude 18.2 North and longitude 32.7 West. Her estimated minimum central pressure is 950 millibars. Julia is moving toward the northwest near 15 mph and this general motion is expected to continue over the next day or two.

Julia is expected to maintain its intensity today before slowly weakening later on Sept. 16 from increased southerly wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.















September 14, 2010

NASA Covering Julia As She Becomes Hurricane Number Five

Strong convection (purple) and high, powerful thunderstorm cloud tops still exist in Julia's center. › View larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Storm Julia (just west of the Cape Verde Islands) shows strong convection (purple) and high, powerful thunderstorm cloud tops still exist in her center. The image was captured from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite at Sept. 14 at 03:11 UTC (Sept. 13 at 11:11 p.m. EDT). Forecasters are watching the other rounded area (purple and blue) just off the African coast for future development.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Scattered to broken bands of moderate to heavy rainfall converging into Julia's center of circulation. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite passed over Julia on Sept. 14 at 0316 UTC and showed scattered to broken bands of moderate to heavy rainfall (red indicates rainfall as much as 2 inches per hour) converging into Julia's center of circulation. The Cape Verde Islands are located to the right (east).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites captured rainfall data and cloud temperature data from Julia as she was upgraded to a hurricane by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) on Tuesday, September 14 at 0900 UTC ( 5:00 a.m. EDT) making it the fifth hurricane of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season.

Intensifying tropical storm Julia was almost directly below the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite when it passed over her on September 14 at 0316 UTC (Sept. 13 at 11:16 p.m. EDT). TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data clearly showed scattered to broken bands of moderate to heavy rainfall converging into Julia's center of circulation. Six hours later Julia reached hurricane status.

Additional satellite imagery this morning also confirmed that Julia continues to strengthen. Satellite data showed a well-defined eyewall surrounded by two prominent bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center.

At 11 a.m. EDT today, Sept. 14, Julia's maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from her center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles from the center. Hurricane Julia was located near latitude 16.2 north and longitude 29.5 west about 355 miles west-northwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands. Julia is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph. Estimated minimum central pressure is 984 millibars.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Julia when she was located just west of the Cape Verde Islands on Sept. 14 at 03:11 UTC (Sept. 13 at 11:11 p.m. EDT). That infrared image showed strong convection and high, powerful thunderstorm cloud tops (as cold as or colder than -60 degrees Fahrenheit) in her center.

The AIRS image also captured another area of showers and thunderstorms behind (east of) Julia, located just off the African coast, which forecasters are also watching for possible future development.

Although Hurricane Igor is located far to Julia's west, Igor will have an effect on Julia in the next day or so. Water vapor imagery this morning showed that a mid- to upper-level trough (elongated area of low pressure) that is related to the outflow of hurricane Igor is a couple hundred miles northwest of Julia. Computer modeling suggests that the trough of low pressure will begin serving Julia with some westerly wind shear (winds that can weaken a tropical cyclone) after 24 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 13, 2010

NASA Sees Tropical Storm Julia Born with Strong Thunderstorms and Heavy Rainfall

TRMM captured heavy rainfall around Julia's center on Sept. 12  about 9 hours before she reached tropical storm status. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured heavy rainfall (red) around Julia's center on Sept. 12 at 1822 UTC (2:22 p.m. EDT) about 9 hours before she reached tropical storm status. Rain in the red areas was falling at more than 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Infrared image of Julia early on Sept. 12 when it was Tropical Depression 12 just east-southeast of the Cape Verde Islands. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 12 early on Sept. 12 when it was just east-southeast of the Cape Verde Islands. At that time it showed strong convection and powerful thunderstorms around its center (purple). By 11 p.m. EDT that day it became Tropical Storm Julia. Warm sea surface temperatures of 80F or higher (orange) surround Julia.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 12 was born in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean yesterday, Sept. 12 and two NASA satellites saw factors that indicated she would later strengthen into Tropical Storm Julia. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed strong convection in its center that powered the storm into tropical storm status by 11 p.m. EDT. NASA's TRMM satellite indicated very heavy rainfall from that strong area of convection.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite gives scientists and meteorologists clues about how a tropical cyclone is behaving by providing critical temperature data. When Aqua flew over Tropical Depression 12 early on Sept. 12 the concentration of strong convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) were large and surrounded the depression's center. Cloud top temperatures over a large area were as cold or colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit, and those thunderstorms were strong. The convection continued on Sept. 12 and the storm finally strengthened into Tropical Storm Julia.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, which is operated jointly by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA captured a very good daytime look at Julia when she was tropical depression 12 on September 12 at 1822 UTC (2:22p.m. EDT). TRMM showed that TD12 was starting to get organized and had moderate to very heavy rainfall converging into the center of the future storm's circulation. Julia is another in a series of 2010 tropical cyclones forming near the Cape Verde Islands off the African Coast.

Tropical Storm Julia is moving away from the southernmost Cape Verde Islands today, Sept. 13, but not before she lashes them with winds and rain. Tropical storm force winds in squalls are expected over parts of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands this morning and diminish later today. In addition, much of the Cape Verde islands can expect 2 to 4 inches of rainfall with higher totals in isolated areas.

She was "born" on Sept. 12 at around 11 a.m. EDT near 12.7 North and 21.4 West. Since then, she's moved west to 14.5 North and 25.6 West, which is about 85 miles west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands. Her maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph, and is expected to strengthen in the next couple of days, possibly reaching hurricane status. Julia is moving west-northwest near 14 mph and had a minimum central pressure of 1004 millibars.

Julia is expected to continue moving west-northwest, then turn northwest and slow down tomorrow.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Hal Pierce, SSAI