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Hurricane Season 2010: Guatemala Low (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
07.30.10
 
July 30, 2010

GOES-11 shows the Guatemalan low as a comma-shaped area of clouds off of the west Central American coast. > View larger image
Visible imagery from GOES-11 captured on July 30 at 11:30 a.m. EDT showed the low as a comma-shaped area of clouds (lower right) off of the west Central American coast.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
Satellites See Eastern Pacific Low Slow to Grow

NASA Satellite imagery has indicated that the low pressure area in the eastern Pacific Ocean that forecasters are watching for possible development is slow to grow.

Visible imagery from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-11 captured on July 30 at 1530 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT) showed the low as a comma-shaped area of clouds off of the west Central American coast. GOES satellites are operated by NOAA. The NASA GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates imagery and animations using data from the GOES series of satellites.

The broad area of low pressure that forecasters are watching is centered about 500 miles south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The low continues to produce showers and thunderstorms as it moves westward and west-northwestward at around 10 mph.

The National Hurricane Center expects that any further development of this low pressure area will be slow, and gives the low a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



July 29, 2010

A small area of clouds (far right)  and showers in the Eastern Pacific, a couple hundred miles south of Guatemala. > View larger image
This visible image from the GOES-11 satellite taken on July 29 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) shows the small area of clouds (far right) and showers in the Eastern Pacific, a couple hundred miles south of Guatemala.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-11 Watching a Low Pressure Area Near Central America

There's a broad area of low pressure located a couple of hundred miles south of Guatemala with clouds and showers and forecasters are keeping any eye on it using imagery from the GOES-11 and other satellites.

The latest visible image from the GOES-11 satellite taken on July 29 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) showed a small area of clouds and showers in the Eastern Pacific, a couple hundred miles south of Guatemala. NOAA manages the operation of the GOES series of satellites, and the NASA GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. provides imagery and animations from GOES satellite data.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that the system has changed little in organization during the early morning hours today, July 29. Any development of this disturbance is expected to be slow to occur as it moves westward or west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph.

As of today, the NHC only gives this system a ten percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center