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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Depression Gaston (Atlantic Ocean)
09.08.10
 
September 8, 2010

Gaston's remnants over the eastern Caribbean at 10:31 a.m. EDT (1431 UTC) on September 8. > View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Gaston's remnants over the eastern Caribbean at 10:31 a.m. EDT (1431 UTC) on September 8, a couple hundred miles southeast of the Dominican Republic.
Credit:
NOAA/NASA GOES Project
Gaston Again Running Out of Gas

Gaston has been a fighter in the Atlantic, and it finally appears that Gaston has run out of "gas" for the last time over the eastern Caribbean Sea. Given Gaston's track record for comebacks, however, he can't be counted out for the last time.

The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of Gaston's remnants over the eastern Caribbean at 10:31 a.m. EDT (1431 UTC) on September 8, a couple hundred miles southeast of the Dominican Republic. The remnants of Gaston were producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms.

GOES satellites are operated by NOAA, and images and animations are created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. now says that development of this system is not expected as it moves westward at 10 to 15 mph. In fact, Gaston seems to be permanently out of gas as the NHC forecasters give him a "Near zero percent" chance of becoming a tropical cyclone again in the next 48 hours. After that, however, we'll have to see if this feisty little system moves into a better environment in the Caribbean and gets powered up again.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 7, 2010

Remnant clouds from what was Gaston over the Leeward Islands and northeastern Caribbean Sea. > View larger image
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite at 15:45 UTC (11:45 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 7, 2010, shows the remnant clouds from what was Gaston over the Leeward Islands and northeastern Caribbean Sea.
Credit:
NOAA/NASA GOES Project
Gaston's Remnants Gasping for Rebirth Over the Leewards

The remnants of Tropical Storm Gaston are still alive in the Atlantic Ocean basin, and are still gasping for another chance at life. GOES-13 satellite imagery from earlier today, September 7 showed Gaston's remnants over the Leeward Islands and the northeastern Caribbean Sea.

All that's left of Gaston are clouds and showers in the northeastern Caribbean, and a visible satellite image from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured them at 15:45 UTC (11:45 a.m. EDT) today. GOES-13 is one of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites operated by NOAA. NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations from GOES satellite data.

Gaston's remnants are moving westward at 15 to 20 mph farther into the Caribbean Sea, but are not expected to develop much in the next couple of days because of an unfriendly environment. The National Hurricane Center gives Gaston only a 10 percent chance of rebirth in the next 48 hours.

Meanwhile, two other areas in the Atlantic Ocean that forecasters are watching also have a meager 10 percent chance of development. One is about 350 miles west of the northernmost Cape Verde Islands. It has disorganized clouds and showers and they're expected to stay that way for the next couple of days.

The second area of showers and thunderstorms are even farther east, between the Cape Verde Islands and the west coast of Africa. That area of disturbed weather is associated with a tropical wave and it's moving west between 10 and 15 mph.

All three of these systems in the Atlantic basin will be slow to develop over the next couple of days, so it's a slow start to the week for the Atlantic tropics.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 3, 2010

Tropical Depression Gaston seemed to have a compact circulation with some high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops around its center of circulation. > View larger image
AIRS infrared image taken Sept. 2 at 0423 UTC (12:23 a.m. EDT) showed that Tropical Depression Gaston seemed to have a compact circulation with some high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) around its center of circulation. Those clouds reached so high into the troposphere that they were colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit. It later weakened as it encountered dry, stable air.
Credit:
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Gaston Ran Out of "Gas"

The "gas" has been taken out of Tropical Depression Gaston's hurricane heat engine, and it has now degenerated into a remnant low pressure system thanks to dry, stable air.

The National Hurricane Center has issued its last advisory on Tropical Depression Gaston which degenerated into a remnant low by 8 p.m. EDT on Thursday, September 2. Gaston's remnants were located about 1000 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands when his engine seized and he ran out of gas (moist, unstable air that helps power tropical cyclones.

Even though environmental conditions may improve a little as the remnant low moves westward at 5 to 10 mph during the next couple of days, the National Hurricane center gives it a low chance (20 percent) of becoming Gaston again over the Labor Day holiday weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.







September 2, 2010

Tropical Depression Gaston seemed to have a compact circulation with some high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops around its center of circulation. > View larger image
AIRS infrared image taken Sept. 2 at 0423 UTC (12:23 a.m. EDT) showed that Tropical Depression Gaston seemed to have a compact circulation with some high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) around its center of circulation. Those clouds reached so high into the troposphere that they were colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit. It later weakened as it encountered dry, stable air.
Credit:
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Depression Nine Become Gaston Then Back to a Depression

Tropical Depression Nine strengthened yesterday into Tropical Storm Gaston, but today it ran into dry and stable air and weakened back into a depression again.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Gaston early this morning, Sept. 2 at 0423 UTC (12:23 a.m. EDT), the infrared image taken from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument showed that Tropical Depression Gaston seemed to have a compact circulation with some high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops around its center of circulation. Those clouds reached so high into the troposphere that they were colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit. Later this morning, Gaston encountered some stable and drier air, weakening it back to a tropical depression.

Visible and infrared satellite imagery late this morning showed deep convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms that power the cyclone) had decreased considerably since the AIRS image was captured, and convection and is limited to a broken band over the western and northern part of the circulation.

At 11 a.m. EDT today, Gaston's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph, although some re- strengthening is possible as it moves into a better environment. The center of Tropical Depression Gaston was about 970 miles west of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands, or about 1500 miles east of the Lesser Antilles near latitude 14.0 north and longitude 38.9 west. The depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 7 mph and should continue in that direction for the next couple of days. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1008 millibars.

Even though Gaston is in an area of warm waters and upper level winds that will allow it to develop, the dry and stable air is keeping it weak, so re-strengthening is likely to be a slow process. For now, it is no threat to land.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.



September 1, 2010

Tropical Depression 9 in infrared › Larger image
This infrared image from NASA's AIRS instrument onboard the Aqua satellite shows Tropical Depression 9 on Sept. 1 at 03:41 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:41 p.m. EDT). It shows high thunderstorm cloud tops west and southwest of the center of circulation (purple) indicating strong convection.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Infrared NASA Image Shows Strong Convection in New Atlantic Depression 9

The Atlantic Ocean is in overdrive this week, and NASA satellite imagery captured the birth of the ninth tropical depression in the central Atlantic Ocean today, trailing to the east of Tropical Storm Fiona.

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, flying onboard the Aqua satellite, captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 9 on Sept. 1 at 03:41 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:41 p.m. EDT). It showed high thunderstorm cloud tops west and southwest of the center of circulation indicating strong convection.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 1, Tropical Depression 9 (TD9) was born in the Atlantic Ocean. It had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph, and was moving west at 15 mph. It was located about 830 miles west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near 12.4 North and 35.8 West. Although there are warm sea surface temperatures (as seen in NASA's infrared AIRS imagery) over the 80 degree Fahrenheit threshold that's needed to power up tropical cyclones, there is wind shear in the area, so intensification will be slow to occur.

When the storm becomes at tropical storm it would be named "Gaston."

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.